Solar Cooking and Sustainability Event in Taylor AZ – Feb 18

at Northland Pioneer College, Snowflake, Arizona
Saturday, February 18, 2012 – 1 to 4 pm – Free admission

We are having a tribute to Barbara Kerr and Sherry Cole who invigorated a solar cooking movement when they lived in Tempe in the 1970’s. We’ve got some great speakers and everyone will have a chance to say something.

Please see http://kerr-cole.org/index.php/tribute

Admission is free, but we are requesting on-line registration so that we can better plan. There will be networking opportunities throughout the weekend.

Thanks!

Lynn Snyder
Kerr-Cole Sustainable Living Center

PV101 Solar Electric Design and Installation (Grid-Direct) – two 6-day workshops starting Feb 20 and March 12

PV101 Solar Electric Design and Installation (Grid-Direct) Workshop

This course will provide an overview of the three basic PV system applications, primarily focusing on grid-direct systems. The goal of the course is to create a fundamental understanding of the core concepts necessary to work with all PV systems, including: system components, site analysis, PV module criteria, mounting solutions, safety, and commissioning.

Solar Energy International is going to be hosting two PV101 Solar Electric Design and Installation workshops in Tucson, in February and March of 2012. This is a great way to get into the field of Renewable Energy. We are a non profit educational organization that has been teaching for over 20 years!

Please visit our website www.solarenergy.org or call 970-963-8855 for more information.

Hot Chile Recipes – Native Seeds / SEARCH – Free Monthly Salon – Feb 20

at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N. Campbell Road
February 20, Monday 5:30 – 7:30 pm, Free

Native Seeds / SEARCH Monthly Salons – A little something for anyone who has ever wielded a fork or pitchfork. Bring your juiciest ideas and appetite for mind-watering conversations.

Celia Riddle, owner & creator of Hot Flash Chile Products

Celia will demonstrate how you can incorporate her delicious Roasted Green Chile & Red Chile pastes into your recipes, and will have food to sample.

Mole Recipes – Native Seeds / SEARCH – Free Monthly Salon – March 19

at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N. Campbell Road
March 19, Monday 5:30 – 7:30 pm, Free

Amy Schwemm, owner of the Mano y Metate line of tasty and versatile moles

Amy will talk about how she created her moles and ways to use them in your cooking, and of course will provide samples. The varieties include Mole Dulce, Mole Adobo, Mole Verde and Mole Pipian Rojo.

Native Seeds / SEARCH Monthly Salons – A little something for anyone who has ever wielded a fork or pitchfork. Bring your juiciest ideas and appetite for mind-watering conversations.

Annual Flavors of the Desert – April 28

at the University of Arizona and Tohono Chul Park

ANNUAL FLAVORS OF THE DESERT

This year we are celebrating the 1981 landmark gathering of the folks who would become the luminaries of the seed world, with a day of workshops at the University of Arizona, and then in the evening at Tohono Chul Park, we will enjoy a feast of place-based, mouth-watering food as we celebrate a legacy of diversity.

ATTEND ▪ SPONSOR ▪ DONATE TO SILENT AUCTION

Watch our website www.nativeseeds.org for more information…

Seed School – Native Seeds / SEARCH – 6-day classes in 2012

March 4 – 9 in Tucson
April 12 – 14 Seed Library School
Summer Saturdays: June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 14
Oct 28 – Nov 2 in Phoenix

Seed School – Native Seeds / SEARCH

Six-day trainings in Tucson, Arizona, facilitated by NS/S Executive Director Bill McDorman, author of Basic Seed Saving.

Bill is a 30-year veteran of the bioregional seed movement and founder of several successful seed companies and nonprofits.  Learn the history, philosophy and genetics as well as the practical applications of growing, harvesting, packaging and exchanging or selling seeds.

Special guests include Dr. Gary Nabhan, Cofounder of Native Seeds/SEARCH; Steve Peters, Family Farmer Seed Cooperative and NS/S Farm Supervisor; Rich Pratt, Chair of Plant & Environmental Sciences, New Mexico State University.

Contact: Belle(at)nativeseeds.org 520.622.0830 x104 or x100

ST committee on Food/Water

The ad hoc committee on Food & Water, we begin to develop a Sustainable Tucson General Meeting for later in the year.  The goal of that meeting will be to initiate some sort of action in the area of food and water.  It is up to the ad hoc committee, working with the Core Team, to determine what that action will be.

This meeting will end at 6:00 and the goal is to identify a preferred topic(s) for the General Meeting, and then identify the agenda for the next ad hoc committee meeting and assign tasks for it.  PLEASE BE PREARED to make a brief statement of any topic that you would like to offer as a possible action to be initiated at the General Meeting.

If you plan to attend, please let Tres English (795-3413) (tres1@mindspring.com> — ASAP.  We will be meeting near Alvernon & Broadway.  

WMG Composting Toilet Program – Seeking Participants – Feb 9

Soil Steward Composting Toilet Program – Seeking Participants

 

Are you…

  • An early adopter who likes to be part of a cutting-edge pilot program to influence city and state policy?
  • Tired of flushing potable water down the toilet and interested in building a legal composting toilet for your home?
  • Interested in using alternative composting systems to improve your soil and fertilize trees and other plants?
  • Want to get geeky about soil – how to build healthy soils and conserve water while producing food and lush native landscapes?

Watershed Management Group invites you to attend an informational session: Thursday, February 9th, 6-8pm. Register (free) to attend this informational session on participating in WMG’s Soil Steward Compost Toilet program (attendance required to apply to be a pilot participant) – Register here.

This informational session will include:

  • The activities and information taught in the Soil Stewards program
  • Composting toilet designs offered through the program (site-built), proper use, permitting, and legal issues
  • How to apply to receive a subsidy and be an exclusive pilot participant to receive a legal site built composting toilet

If you’re interested in participating or learning more about our Soil Stewards program, please contact Catlow Shipek at catlow(at)watershedmg.org.

The project is possible through grant funding from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Region 9 for their environmental education projects.

Pima County Food Systems Alliance – Meeting & Potluck – January 31

On January 31st, there will be a meeting of the Pima County Food Systems Alliance, at Tucson Village Farm, 4210 N Campbell Ave

The Pima County Food Systems Alliance (PCFSA) is an open membership network comprised of a variety of groups and individuals—including but not limited to farmers, chefs, restaurants, schools, educators, youth, gardeners, researchers, food banks, health professionals, attorneys, nonprofits, activists, and consumers.  The Alliance works in a collaborative manner to serve as a space to invite discussion and foster learning and education for those who are directly affected by food insecurity, as well as legislative decision makers about food policy.

Also see the new PCFSA website at http://pimafoodalliance.org/ and PCFSA on Facebook

Seed Library of Pima County Public Library – Grand Opening January 28

10am-5pm at Joel D Valdez Main Library, 101 N Stone Ave, Downtown Tucson

Pima County Public Library invites you to the grand opening of its Seed Library and introducing the new Pima County Public Library Bookbike!

The Seed Library is a collection of edible, decorative, and herb seed varieties that community members will borrow, use to grow plants at home, and then return a portion of the seeds they harvest at the end of the season. Over time, the seed library’s collection will become self-sustaining and most importantly, the seeds will become super seeds–strong, resilient, and well adapted to Arizona’s harsh climate.

Special guests will offer presentations and demonstrations about planting, cultivating, and harvesting your own food. Find out about resources for experienced gardeners, as well as ideas about getting started with your own patch. Get a look at the Bookbike and hobnob with bicycling enthusiasts.

Talk with folks from local seed and garden organizations – Native Seeds/SEARCH, Sustainable Tucson, Marana Heritage Farm, Community Gardens of Tucson, Tucson Organic Gardeners, Arizona Native Plant Society, and others.

For more info and a schedule of the day’s presentations and events, go to www.library.pima.gov/about/news/?id=3823

Learn to Save Money in the Kitchen and Home! – January 26

On January 26th, Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market will host 2 DIY workshops to help Tucsonans stretch their dollars with homemade soaps and food preservation techniques.

From 3 to 4pm, Joyce Speirs from Dragnass Soaps will lead a workshop on homemade laundry detergent.

From 4 to 5pm, Tiffany Rose Wood, a local integrative nutritionist, will demonstrate how the use of dehydration and freezing techniques can allow us to preserve our seasonal foods longer while maintaining the food’s vital nutrients. Woods will also explain how these preservation techniques can help with meal planning to ensure you save time and money without letting any of those fresh fruits and vegetables go to waste.

The Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market is located at Mercado San Agustin, 100 S. Avenida del Convento, west of 1-10 near Congress/Grande. For more information please call 882-3304.

Southern Arizona Green for All Coalition – January 24

Green for All and The Southern Arizona Green for All Coalition (SAGAC) invite you to our first Tucson Meet and Greet information session.

Join us on January 24th from 9:00 A.M. to 10:30 A.M. to learn more about how Tucson is engaging in a new initiative to build a broad-based coalition to address our local issues of environment, equity, and employment, all while holding the most vulnerable people at the center of the agenda. Please come and be part of this inspiring opportunity.

Who: Southern Arizona Green for All Coalition, Green for All, and Tucson Allies

When: Tuesday, January 24th from 9:00 A.M. to 10:30 A.M.

Where: Pima County Juvenile Detention Center, 2225 E. Ajo Way (Training Center East Side of Court House)

RSVP: Madeline Kiser, mkiser(at)dakotacom.net

Green for All is a national organization working to build an inclusive green economy strong enough to lift people out of poverty. Their mission is to improve the lives of all Americans through a clean energy economy.

The Southern Arizona Green for All Coalition organizing committee: Rosa Gonzalez, Green for All, Luis Perales, Tierra y Libertad Organization; Green for All Fellow, Eva Dong, Pima Accommodation District; Pima County Juvenile and Adult Detention Centers, Richard Fimbres, Tucson City Council Member; Pima County Adult Detention Center, Leona Davis, Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona, Camila Thorndike, Community Activist, Kim Chumley, Pima County Juvenile Detention Center, Martina Dickson, Pima County Adult Detention Center, Lewis Humprheys, The Wonder of We; TEDxTucson, Josh Schachter, photographer; Finding Voice, & Madeline Kiser, Inside/Out Poetry and Sustainability Program

stand up tucson, a call to action

all groups and individuals invited,

armory park, this saturday,all free, music ,dinner,speakers, interactive events……

all day…10am to 9pm….an opportunity to connect and collaborate toward our common goals..

represent your group or ck out groups that you might like to be a part of……

info on facebook at stand up tucson…or call 400-4489

 

Citizens’ Climate Lobby Tucson Meeting – January 7th

The Citizens’ Climate Lobby, Tucson Chapter is meeting at 11 am on Saturday at 255 W. University Blvd to join the national chapters’ conference call and discuss local climate lobby plans. If you have any comments before the meeting, please forward them to Vince Pawlowski:  pawlowski (at) ultrasw.com
Reminders for our call on Saturday:

  • Please call  review the individual planning form ( CCLindividplan2012, ) and bring any questions.  This will help the meeting move quickly.
  • If anyone wants to ask a question on the call, please email Vince and he will let Mark know.
  • Link to Mark’s interview: http://citizensclimatelobby.org/video/mark-reynolds  (on our site under press room)

Ten Good Things About a (Not So) Bad Year

Ten Good Things About a (Not So) Bad Year
Medea Benjamin, CommonDreams

I had the privilege of starting out the year witnessing, firsthand, the unfolding of the Egyptian revolution in Tahrir Square. I saw people who had been muzzled their entire lives, especially women, suddenly discovering their collective voice. Singing, chanting, demanding, creating. And that became the hallmark of the entire year–people the world over becoming empowered and emboldened simply by watching each other. Courage, we learned in 2011, is contagious!

1. The Arab Spring protests were so astounding that even Time magazine recognized “The Protester” as Person of the Year

Sparked by Tunisian vendor Mohamed Bouazizi’sself-immolation to cry out against police corruption in December 2010, the protests swept across the Middle East and North Africa—including Egypt,Libya, Bahrain, Syria, Yemen, Algeria, Iraq, and Jordan. So far, uprisings have toppled Tunesian President Ben Ali, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, and Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi–with more shake-ups sure to come. And women have been on the front lines of these protests, highlighted recently by the incredibly brave, unprecedented demo of 10,000 Egyptian women protesting military abuse.

2. Wisconsin caught the Spring Fever, with Madison becoming home to some 100,000 protesters opposing Governor Walker’s threat to destroy collective bargaining and blame the state’s economic woes on public workers. …

3. On September 17 Occupy Wall Street was born in the heart of Manhattan’s Financial District. Protesters railed against the banksters and corporate thieves responsible for the economic collapse.

The movement against the greed of the richest 1% spread to over 1,400 cities in the United States and globally, with newly minted activists embracing–with gusto–people’s assemblies, consensus decision-making, the people’s mic, and upsparkles. Speaking in the name of the 99%, the occupiers changed the national debate from deficits to inequality and corporate abuse. Even after facing heightened police brutality, tent city evictions, and extreme winter weather, protesters are undeterred and continue to create bold actions–from port shut-downs to moving money out of big banks. As Occupy Wall Street said, “You can’t evict an idea whose time has come.” Stay tuned for lots more occupation news in 2012.

4. After 8 long years, U.S. troops were finally withdrawn from Iraq. …

5. The 2011 Nobel Peace Prize was presented to three terrific women: Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the president of Liberia; Leymah Gbowee, the Liberian peace activist; and Yemeni pro-democracy campaigner Tawakkol Karman.

6. The bloated Pentagon budget is no longer immune from budget cuts. The failure of the super-committee means the Pentagon budget could be cut by a total of $1 trillion over the next decade — which would amount to a 23 percent reduction in the defense budget. The hawks are trying to stop the cuts, but most people are more interested in rebuilding America than fattening the Pentagon. That’s why the U.S. Conference of Mayors, for the first time since the Vietnam war, passed a resolution calling for the end to the hostilities and instead investing at home to create jobs, rebuild infrastructure and develop sustainable energy. 2011 pried open the Pentagon’s lock box. Let’s make the cuts in 2012!

7. Elizabeth Warren is running for Senate and Rep. Barbara Lee continues to inspire. …

8. Burmese opposition leader and Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi is running for Parliament!

9. Opposition to Keystone pipeline inspired thousands of new activists, together with a rockin’ coalition of environment groups across the U.S. and Canada.

They brought the issue of the climate-killing pipeline right to President Obama’s door, with over 1,200 arrested in front of the White House. The administration heard them and ordered a new review of the project, but the Republican global warming deniers are trying to force Obama’s hand. Whatever way this struggle ends, it has educated millions about the tar sands threat and trained a new generation of environmentalists in more effective, direct action tactics that will surely result in future “wins” for the planet.

10. Following the tragic meltdown at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan, the growing appetite for nuclear energy has been reversed.

(27 December 2011)

Related: 2011’s Big Wins – Brought to You by Women.

Energy Bulletin is a program of Post Carbon Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping the world transition away from fossil fuels and build sustainable, resilient communities. Content on this site is subject to our fair use notice.

The 12 most hopeful trends to build on in 2012

The 12 most hopeful trends to build on in 2012
Published by YES! Magazine on Sat, 12/31/2011
Original article: http://www.yesmagazine.org/blogs/sarah-van-gelder/12-most-hopeful-trends-to-build-on-in-2012

by Sarah van Gelder

Who would have thought that some young people camped out in lower Manhattan with cardboard signs, a few sharpies, some donated pizza, and a bunch of smart phones could change so much?

The viral spread of the Occupy Movement took everyone by surprise. Last summer, politicians and the media were fixated on the debt ceiling, and everyone seemed to forget that we were in the midst of an economic meltdown—everyone except the 99 percent who were experiencing it.

Today, people ranging from Ben Bernake, chair of the Federal Reserve, to filmmaker Michael Moore are expressing sympathy for the Occupy Movement and concern for those losing homes, retirement savings, access to health care, and hope of ever finding a job.

This uprising is the biggest reason for hope in 2012. The following are 12 ways the Occupy Movement and other major trends of 2011 offer a foundation for a transformative 2012.
 

1. Americans rediscover their political self-respect. In 2011, members of the 99 percent began camping out in New York’s Zuccotti Park, launching a movement that quickly spread across the country. Students at U.C. Davis sat nonviolently through a pepper spray assault, Oaklanders shut down the city with a general strike, and Clevelanders saved a family from eviction. Occupiers opened their encampments to all and fed all who showed up, including many homeless people. Thousands moved their accounts from corporate banks to community banks and credit unions, and people everywhere created their own media with smart phones and laptops. The Occupy Movement built on the Arab Spring, occupations in Europe, and on the uprising, early in 2011, in Wisconsin, where people occupied the state capitol in an attempt to block major cuts in public workers’ rights and compensation. Police crackdowns couldn’t crush the surge of political self-respect experienced by millions of Americans.

After the winter weather subsides, look for the blossoming of an American Spring.


2. Economic myths get debunked. Americans now understand that hard work and playing by the rules don’t mean you’ll get ahead. They know that Wall Street financiers are not working for their interests. Global capitalism is not lifting all boats. As this mythology crumbled, the reality became inescapable: The United States is not broke. The 1 percent have rigged the system to capture a larger and larger share of the world’s wealth and power, while the middle class and poor face unemployment, soaring student debt burdens, homelessness, exclusion from the medical system, and the disappearance of retirement savings. Austerity budgets just sharpen the pain, as the safety net frays and public benefits, from schools to safe bridges, fail. The European debt crisis is front and center today, but other crises will likely follow. Just as the legitimacy of apartheid began to fall apart long before the system actually fell, today, the legitimacy of corporate power and Wall Street dominance is disintegrating.

The new-found clarity about the damage that results from a system dominated by Wall Street will further energize calls for regulation and the rule of law, and fuel the search for economic alternatives


3. Divisions among people are coming down. Middle-class college students camped out alongside homeless occupiers. People of color and white people created new ways to work together. Unions joined with occupiers. In some places, Tea Partiers and occupiers discovered common purposes. Nationwide, anti-immigrant rhetoric backfired.

Tremendous energy is released when isolated people discover one another; look for more unexpected alliances.


4. Alternatives are blossoming. As it becomes clear that neither corporate CEOs nor national political leaders have solutions to today’s deep crises, thousands of grassroots-led innovations are taking hold. Community land trusts, farmers markets, local currencies and time banking, micro-energy installations, shared cars and bicycles, cooperatively owned businesses are among the innovations that give people the means to live well on less and build community. And the Occupy Movement, which is often called “leaderless,” is actually full of emerging leaders who are building the skills and connections to shake things up for decades to come.

This widespread leadership, coupled with the growing repertoire of grassroots innovations, sets the stage for a renaissance of creative rebuilding.


5. Popular pressure halted the Keystone KL Pipeline — for the moment. Thousands of people stood up to efforts by some of the world’s most powerful energy companies and convinced the Obama administration to postpone approval of the Keystone XL Pipeline, which would have sped the extraction and export of dirty tar sands oil. James Hansen says, “If the tar sands are thrown into the mix, it is essentially game over” for the planet. Just a year ago, few had heard of this project, much less considered risking arrest to stop it, as thousands did outside the White House in 2011.

With Congress forcing him to act within 60 days, President Obama will be under enormous pressure from both Big Oil and pipeline opponents. It will be among the key tests of his presidency.


6. Climate responses move forward despite federal inaction. Throughout the United States, state and local governments are taking action where the federal government has failed. California’s new climate cap-and-trade law will take effect in 2012. College students are pressing campus administrators to quit using coal-fired sources of electricity. Elsewhere, Europe is limiting climate pollution from air travel, Australia has enacted a national carbon tax, and there is a global initiative underway to recognize the rights of Mother Nature. Climate talks in Durban, South African, arrived at a conclusion that, while far short of what is needed, at least keeps the process alive.

Despite corporate-funded climate change deniers, most people know climate change is real and dangerous; expect to see many more protests, legislation, and new businesses focused on reducing carbon emissions in 2012.


7. There’s a new focus on cleaning up elections. The Supreme Court’s “Citizens United decision,” which lifted limits on corporate campaign contributions, is opposed by a large majority of Americans. This year saw a growing national movement to get money out of politics; cities from Pittsburgh to Los Angeles are passing resolutions calling for an end to corporate personhood. Constitutional amendments have been introduced. And efforts are in the works to push back against voter suppression policies that especially discourage voting among people of color, low-income people, and students, all of whom tend to vote Democratic.

Watch for increased questioning of the legal basis of corporations, which “we the people” created, but which now facilitate lawlessness and increasing concentrations of wealth and power.


8. Local government is taking action. City and state governments are moving forward, even as Washington, D.C., remains gridlocked, even as budgets are stretched thin. Towns in Pennsylvania, New York, and elsewhere are seeking to prohibit “fracking” to extract natural gas, and while they’re at it, declaring that corporations do not have the constitutional rights of people. Cities are banning plastic bags, linking up local food systems, encouraging bicycling and walking, cleaning up brown fields, and turning garbage and wasted energy into opportunity. In part because of the housing market disaster, people are less able to pick up and move.

Look for increased rootedness, whether voluntary or not, along with increased focus on local efforts to build community solutions.


9. Dams are coming down. Two dams that block passage of salmon up the Elwha River into the pristine Olympic National Park in Washington state are coming down. After decades of campaigning by Native tribes and environmentalists, the removal of the dams began in 2011.

The assumption that progress is built on “taming” and controlling nature is giving way to an understanding that human and ecological well-being are linked.


10. The United States ended the combat mission in Iraq. U.S. troops are home from Iraq at last. What remains is a U.S. embassy compound the size of the Vatican City, along with thousands of private contractors. Iraq and the region remain unstable.

Given the terrible cost in lives and treasure for what most Americans see as an unjustified war, look to greater skepticism of future U.S. invasions.


11. Breakthrough for single-payer health care. The state of Vermont took action to respond to the continuing health care crises, adopting, but not yet funding, a single-payer health care system similar to Canada’s.

As soaring costs of health insurance drain the coffers of businesses and governments, other states may join Vermont at the forefront of efforts to establish a public health insurance system like Canada’s.


12. Gay couples can get married. In 2011, New York state and the Suquamish Tribe in Washington state (home of the author of this piece) adopted gay marriage laws. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Marissa Gaeta won a raffle allowing her to be the first to kiss her partner upon return from 80 days at sea, the first such public display of gay affection since Don’t Ask Don’t Tell was expunged. The video and photos went viral.

2011 may be the year when opposition to gay marriage lost its power as a rallying cry for social conservatives. The tide has turned, and gay people will likely continue to win the same rights as straight people to marry.


With so much in play, 2012 will be an interesting year, even setting aside questions about “end times” and Mayan calendars. As the worldviews and institutions based on the dominance of the 1 percent are challenged, as the global economy frays, and as we run headlong into climate change and other ecological limits, one era is giving way to another. There are too many variable to predict what direction things will take. But our best hopes can be found in the rise of broad grassroots leadership, through the Occupy Movement, the Wisconsin uprising, the climate justice movement, and others, along with local, but interlinked, efforts to build local solution everywhere. These efforts make it possible that 2012 will be a year of transformation and rebuilding — this time, with the well-being of all life front and center.


Sarah van Gelder wrote this article for YES! Magazine, a national, nonprofit media organization that fuses powerful idea with practical actions. Sarah is YES! Magazine’s co-founder and executive editor, and editor of the new book: “This Changes Everything: Occupy Wall Street and the 99% Movement.”

YES! Magazine encourages you to make free use of this article by taking these easy steps. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License

Energy Bulletin is a program of Post Carbon Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping the world transition away from fossil fuels and build sustainable, resilient communities. Content on this site is subject to our fair use notice.


Source URL: http://www.energybulletin.net/stories/2011-12-31/12-most-hopeful-trends-build-2012

Links:
[1] http://www.yesmagazine.org/blogs/sarah-van-gelder/12-most-hopeful-trends-to-build-on-in-2012
[2] http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-power/occupywallstreet
[3] http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-power/this-changes-everything-how-the-99-woke-up
[4] http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/stand-up-to-corporate-power/table-of-contents
[5] http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-power/rejecting-arizona-the-failure-of-the-anti-immigrant-movement
[6] http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/what-makes-a-great-place/community-land-trusts
[7] http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/the-new-economy/dollars-with-good-sense-diy-cash
[8] http://www.yesmagazine.org/new-economy/time-banking-an-idea-whose-time-has-come
[9] http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/the-yes-breakthrough-15/henry-red-cloud-solar-warrior-for-native-america
[10] http://www.yesmagazine.org/planet/lessons-from-a-surprise-bike-town
[11] http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/the-new-economy/clevelands-worker-owned-boom
[12] http://www.yesmagazine.org/planet/nebraskans-speak-out-against-the-pipeline
[13] http://www.yesmagazine.org/blogs/brooke-jarvis/protesters-win-pipeline-delay
[14] http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/new-livelihoods/students-push-coal-off-campus
[15] http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2011/04/13-2
[16] http://www.yesmagazine.org/blogs/madeline-ostrander/after-durban-climate-activists-target-corporate-power
[17] http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/water-solutions/real-people-v.-corporate-people-the-fight-is-on
[18] http://www.energybulletin.net/people-power/keeping-it-clean-maines-fight-for-fair-elections
[19] http://www.energybulletin.net/people-power/turning-occupation-into-lasting-change
[20] http://www.energybulletin.net/planet/how-to-fight-fracking-and-win
[21] http://www.energybulletin.net/issues/the-yes-breakthrough-15/cities-take-up-the-ban-the-bag-fight
[22] http://www.energybulletin.net/blogs/richard-conlin/reflections-on-a-growing-local-food-movement
[23] http://www.energybulletin.net/issues/the-yes-breakthrough-15/hope-for-salmon-as-dams-come-down
[24] http://www.energybulletin.net/issues/columns/building-peace-in-iraq
[25] http://www.energybulletin.net/people-power/wendell-potter-on-vermonts-health-care-plan
[26] http://www.energybulletin.net/issues/health-care-for-all/has-canada-got-the-cure
[27] http://www.yesmagazine.org
[28] http://www.energybulletin.net/products/this-changes-everything/this-changes-everything
[29] http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/
[30] http://www.yesmagazine.org/about/reprints

ST February Meeting – Climate Change in Tucson and the Southwest – Dr Jonathan Overpeck

at DuVal Auditorium, University Medical Center, 1501 N Campbell Avenue

Sustainable Tucson’s February Meeting will be a special public lecture event in collaboration with the Tucson Audubon Society and the Community Water Coalition.

University of Arizona climate scientist Dr. Jonathan Overpeck will speak on Climate Change: What does it mean for Tucson and the Southwest?

drought mapLast year’s increase in carbon emissions to our atmosphere, an estimated extra half-billion tons, was almost certainly the largest absolute jump in any year since the Industrial Revolution, and the largest percentage increase since 2003.

This trend of ever-rising emissions will make climate change an increasing challenge in coming decades. What are the particular possible outcomes for Tucson and the southwest? Water supply, food security, fire risk, habitability for people and wildlife will all be affected.

Dr. Overpeck is a founding co-director of the Institute of the Environment, as well as a Professor of Geosciences and a Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Arizona, and an author of the Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Fifth Assessment.

Monday, February 13, 7:00pm
Free and open to the public

DuVal Auditorium
University Medical Center
1501 N Campbell Avenue
(NE section of the main University Medical Center building)

Directions: Go in the main entrance of the Medical Center building, which faces east toward Campbell Avenue. Immediately turn right down the hall where you will find the doors to the DuVal Auditorium on your left.

Parking Note: There is parking in the multi-tiered Patient/Visitor parking garage closest to the auditorium; however, a fee is charged. Free parking is available south of Mabel Street, across from the College of Nursing.

See map at http://www.azumc.com/body.cfm?id=13

[The audio recording of this lecture is now available here online – go to the first comment below…]

ST statement of support for Occupy Wall Street and Occupy Tucson

Sustainable Tucson’s statement of support for the Occupy Wall Street movement and Occupy Tucson

The mission of Sustainable Tucson is to create a community-wide network of people and organizations facilitating and accelerating Tucson’s transition to sustainability through education and collaborative action.

A sustainable community embodies social justice and economic justice as well as environmental justice. Our vision of a healthy, vibrant and ongoing community that offers future generations resources that are on par with what have been available to previous generations is consistent with the social and economic goals embodied by the Occupy Wall Street movement.

As such, Sustainable Tucson endorses the Occupy movement generally, and Occupy Tucson specifically, as these organizations seek solutions to the growing inequities in our society.

Sustainable Tucson Core Team
January 1, 2012

Also see:  occupywallst.orgoccupytucson.orgwikipedia articles