Communicating Climate Change

Our January General Meeting focuses on issues of how we communicate on Climate Change. To stimulate our discussion, we will view selections from a lecture titled “Climate Change in the American Mind,” by Anthony Leiserowitz, the Director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication.

The program includes a reading by Susan Feathers (one of the founders of Sustainable Tucson), from her newly released novel Threshold, which looks at Tucson and the Southwest in the not-so-distant future under the impacts of climate change.

Please join us to be part of the discussion and explore ways in which we can communicate more effectively on this vital issue.

Note new day of the week and new location for 2017 General Meetings.

Tuesday, January 10, 2017
Ward 6 Office, 3202 E 1st St. (one block south of Speedway, one block east of Country Club)
Doors open 5:30 for networking. Program starts 6 pm.

Further References:

Yale Program on Climate Change Communication:

http://climatecommunication.yale.edu

Dr. Anthony Leiserowitz – full March 2015 lecture:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpmcJDr3KX8

Key Climate Scientists

Dr. James Hansen, 2016 lecture

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42wtAennn8w

Dr. Kevin Anderson 2016 Interview

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ck_Ev8oqBh0

December Meeting – Celebrating Community and Sustainability

At our December meeting, we will show how you can celebrate the holidays sustainably. Our first guest, Local First Arizona, will talk about the benefits of shopping “locally” and provide a local guide. Next, we’ve invited Upcycle Tucson to demonstrate how to use recycled materials to make art, gifts, and gift-wraps. We’ll close the evening celebrating community by dancing and singing with the Tucson Circle / Dances of Universal Peace.

Local First Arizona
Think Local. Buy Local. Be Local. Local First Arizona is a nonprofit organization that celebrates independent, locally owned businesses. The organization’s vision is an Arizona economy that is sustainable, resilient, and celebratory of diverse cultures. Local First Arizona educates citizens about local business ownership, social equity, cultural diversity, environmental kinship, and collaboration. It raises public awareness of the economic and cultural benefits provided by strong local economies. Local businesses contribute to a sustainable economy for Arizona and build vibrant communities we’re all proud to call home.

Upcycle Tucson
Shop, create, participate, and advocate! Upcycle Tucson is a creative reuse arts center. Their mission is to promote the creation of functional and aesthetic art from scrap (reusable materials). Upcycle provides inexpensive and gently used materials and offers fun classes on upcycled art. They support local artisans with a gallery featuring the community’s upcycled art. Tonight they will demonstrate how to make a small gift box from an old gift card!

Dances of Universal Peace
Building and Celebrating Community. From the beginning of time, sacred movement, song and story have brought people together. The Dances of Universal Peace are part of this timeless tradition. In the spirit of building community, Sustainable Tucson brings the Dances of Universal Peace to our December meeting. The Dances are simple, meditative, joyous, multi-cultural circle dances that use sacred phrases and movements from all of the world’s wisdom traditions. They touch the spiritual essence within ourselves, and allow us to recognize it in others. There are no performers and no audience.
Please bring cookies or other goodies to share!

December 12, 2016 6 pm – 8 pm (doors open at 5:30 pm)
St. Mark’s Presbyterian Church, Geneva Hall
3809 E. 3rd Street (free parking in church lot on 2nd St.)

COP22: A Multimedia Presentation and Discussion about the UN Climate Talks in Marrakech

Speaker(s):
Remy Franklin, Masters Candidate, School of Geography and Development
Location:
ENR2, Rm S230

School of Geography and Development MA Candidate Remy Franklin tells the story of COP22 from his perspective as an activist and observer with the youth advocacy organization, SustainUS.

Sponsored by the Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice.

Light refreshments will be served at 5:45pm.

Localizing Our Economy

Please join Sustainable Tucson for the November General Meeting, “Localizing Our Economy.” We’re excited to present speakers on two innovative tools for financing local entrepreneurs and stimulating the local economy.

• Jim and Pamela Powers Hannley, from Arizonans for a New Economy, will speak on the benefits and possibility of creating an Arizona State Bank, a system designed to support local needs and local control of financial activity.
• Chris Squires, of Ten 55 Brewing, will speak on crowd-funding, equity investment, and the JOBS (Jumpstart Our Business Startups) Act, a law that adjusted various securities regulations in order to encourage broader opportunities for funding of small businesses.

Discussion and Q&A will follow the presentation

6pm-8pm (doors open at 5:30)
St. Mark’s Presbyterian Church, Geneva Hall
3809 E. 3rd Street (free parking in church lot on 2nd St.)

Localizing Our Economy

Please join Sustainable Tucson for the November General Meeting, “Localizing Our Economy.” We’re excited to present speakers on two innovative tools for financing local entrepreneurs and stimulating the local economy.

Jim and Pamela Powers Hannley, from Arizonans for a New Economy, will speak on the benefits and possibility of creating an Arizona State Bank, a system designed to support local needs and local control of financial activity.
Chris Squires, of Ten 55 Brewing, will speak on crowd-funding, equity investment, and the JOBS (Jumpstart Our Business Startups) Act, a law that adjusted various securities regulations in order to encourage broader opportunities for funding of small businesses.
Discussion and Q&A will follow the presentations.

St. Mark’s Presbyterian Church, Geneva Hall
6pm-8pm (doors open at 5:30)
3809 E. 3rd Street (free parking in church lot on 2nd St.)

Religious response to environmental issues

Saint Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church, 602 N. Wilmot Road, will discuss global climate change and the impact to the environment with five speakers, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29. An optional Mass begins at 8:30 a.m.

According to press materials, speakers include:

Katie Hirschboeck, associate professor of climatology for the University of Arizona’s tree-ring lab and a Catholic Climate Ambassador.
Clark Hansen, a regional organizer for Bread for the World.
Marco Liu, director of advocacy and outreach for the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona.
Angel Wang from the Episcopal Diocese of Arizona’s committee on creation care.
The Rev. John Leech, associate priest of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church.

To RSVP, email hsieh@dakotacom.net by Tuesday, Oct. 25.

For more information, visit smallangelstucson.org or call 886-7292.

UN Conference in Tucson on Food & Water in Arid Lands

A Food and Water Conference, and a Celebration of Place

WHAT: The 2016 ITKI ● UNESCO ● City of Gastronomy Conference in Tucson, Arizona, USA: Food and Water in Arid Lands: Dialogues across Contemporary and Traditional Knowledge

WHEN: Opens on Friday, November 4, 2016 and concludes on Saturday, November 5 at 5pm, followed by a closing celebration to which all are invited. Additional programming before and after the Conference also available for those interested.

WHERE: The Conference will be held on the University of Arizona Campus, largely in the Student Union Memorial Center.

COST: Absolutely free, but registration required. Space is limited. Please join us!

Please join us for this opportunity to learn about efforts across the globe to create sustainable and thoughtful futures informed by place, history, Traditional Knowledge, and other ways of knowing.

As the world undergoes climate change, urban and rural communities in arid lands need effective adaptive strategies for ensuring resilience in the face of increasing environmental variability, changing weather patterns, dwindling water resources, and intensifying strains on food systems and food security. Join us November 4 and 5, 2016 for discussions with expert panelists about their experiences with water management and water scarcity, their work toward just food systems and sovereignty, and their insights on the roles of local knowledge in adaptation and climate change.

In addition to the Conference, panelists, distinguished guests, and attendees are encouraged to join a number of excursions that highlight both the uniqueness of our region’s cultural and food heritage, as well as our unique scientific inquiries into Earth’s living systems. Click here for more on our Friday night dinner and reception with James Beard Award winning Chef Janos Wilder at the Carriage House, and our Sunday morning brunch and programming at the Desert Museum.
For more on Tucson as a ‘culinary capital’:

Tucson becomes an unlikely food star (New York Times, 23 August 2016)
Tucson, Arizona, cultivates its foodie reputation – with a nod from Unesco (The Guardian, 17 July 2016)

6th Annual Envision Tucson Sustainable Festival


We’re very excited about this year’s Envision Tucson Sustainable Festival, this Sunday, October 16, 11am-4pm, at the YWCA, 525 N. Bonita Ave., with an amazing variety of exhibitors and vendors, speakers, food, music, and lots of fun for all. Check out the Festival website for details.

The Festival is taking place close to Tucson’s origins, reminding us of a history reaching back over 4,000 years of continuous agriculture. Talk about sustainable roots! And Mission Gardens will be at the Festival to share some of that history with us. At the same time, we’re at the heart of Tucson’s Emerging 2030 District, looking to create a sustainable future by working with building owners to reduce energy and water use by 50% by the year 2030.

There’ll be plenty of free parking, but if you choose to come (sustainably) by bike, there’ll be a Bike Valet provided by Living Streets Alliance and sponsored by Ajo Bikes.

So join us on Sunday: Learn about recycling granite for your home, recycling for art projects, and recycling for creating new tools and vehicles. Bring your questions about sustainability issues from desert gardening to neighborhood resilience, from solar for the home to solar cooking, from slow food to native fruits, from energy efficiency to electric vehicles. Find out about improving air quality, harvesting our precious rainwater, building green homes, and much, much more.

AND — There’s still opportunity to volunteer and help on the day of the Festival, from set-up in the morning to break-down at the end of the day. Use the Volunteer page on the Festival website if you can help.

Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) Candidate Forum

You’re invited to our next Tucson Energy Group (TEG) Talk which will be an Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) Candidate Forum on Thur (9/29), 5:00 – 7:00 PM in the meeting room at Ermanos (http://www.ermanosbrew.com/). (Interested people under 21 years old can attend!)

Candidates Attending:
Robert “Bob” Burns (www.BobBurns.gop),
Tom Chabin (www.TomChapin.com),
Boyd Dunn (www.BoydDunn.com),
Bill Mundell (www.BillMundell.org ), &
Not yet confirmed:
Andy Tobin (www.AndyTobin.com).

We all know that this 2016 ACC election is critical to Arizona’s future, so I hope that you can join us and distribute this invitation freely to others who might be interested.

The University of Arizona’s Students for Sustainability will be in attendance to register voters during the forum.

Institute of the Environment – Fall Fest 2016

The Institute of the Environment’s annual Fall Fest is back and better than ever, with a graduate student poster competition, amazing door prizes, good food and drink, and remarks from this year’s featured speaker, Rebecca Tsosie, on “Climate Justice, Indigenous Sustainability, and an Ethic of Place.” Come catch up with colleagues and enjoy the festivities in ENR2, the UA’s newest LEED platinum building!

Location: ENR2, Room S107, 1064 E. Lowell Street

Solidarity Rally – resisting the Dakota Access Pipeline

Join Rising Tide Tucson and others for a Solidarity Rally with the water protectors of Standing Rock resisting the Dakota Access Pipeline. We will be gathering on Wednesday September 14th at 4:30 at Bank of America downtown (33 N. Stone, between Congress and Pennington). Bank of America is one of many financial institutions investing in the pipeline. Bring signs showing your solidarity with the indigenous-led resistance and calling out Bank of America for its support of environmental destruction.

Last week, the Red Warrior and Sacred Stone camps issued a call for two weeks of solidarity actions targeting companies responsible for the Dakota Access Pipeline from Sept. 3-17. Let’s make a statement that Tucson stands strong in solidarity with this historic movement.

The proposed pipeline will bring oil from North Dakota to Illinois, crossing the Missouri River near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation, critically endangering water resources for the tribe and desecrating sacred lands containing burial sites and cultural artifacts. The resistance at Standing Rock has brought over a hundred tribes together in a historic display of strength and unity. Bulldozers have already torn up sacred lands, and the people fighting to protect them have been met with pepper spray and attack dogs. Though the Obama administration issued a statement earlier today halting construction in the area until further review, continual pressure is needed to stop this pipeline from becoming a reality.

INTEGRATING SUSTAINABLE BUILDING AND LIVING WITH NATURE

In the first part of his talk, Dr. Fitch will define sustainable and regenerative building and why the concept is so important to society, natural environments, and the Earth’s Biosphere. He will then outline the steps and technologies of sustainable, regenerative building, using the solar-powered home he built in Redstone Canyon, Colorado, as an example. Lastly, he will discuss the environmental, economic, and societal advantages of this type of building including the spiritual benefits.

Dr. John H. Fitch has a long-term interest and career in ecology, wildlife biology, ecosystems conservation, animal behavior, environmental policy, and sustainability. He has worked on these topics in government, academic, and nonprofit organizations. He received a BA in anthropology and zoology from the University of Kansas and a MS and PhD in ecology and zoology from Michigan State University.

Sponsored by Institute for Noetic Sciences
Join us in exploring human consciousness: The most compelling frontier of our time.

Friday, November 4, 2016 at 6:30 PM
Open to the Public — Admission cost: $5
Unity of Tucson, 3617 N. Camino Blanco
off River between Swan & Craycroft

Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) Candidate Forum

You’re invited to our next Tucson Energy Group (TEG) Talk which will be an Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) Candidate Forum on Thur (9/29), 5:00 – 7:00 PM in the meeting room at Ermanos (http://www.ermanosbrew.com/). We all know that this 2016 ACC election is critical to Arizona’s future, so I hope that you can join us and distribute this invitation freely to others who might be interested. Please RSVP by 9/22, if possible, so we can accommodate everyone who wants to attend. Doug (520-250-2553)

Confirmed Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) Candidates:

  • Robert “Bob” Burns (www.BobBurns.gop),
  • Tom Chabin (www.TomChapin.com),
  • Boyd Dunn (www.BoydDunn.com),
  • Bill Mundell (www.BillMundell.org )

Location: meeting room at Ermanos (http://www.ermanosbrew.com/)

Tucson Energy Group (TEG) – Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) Candidate Forum

You’re invited to our next Tucson Energy Group (TEG) Talk which will be an Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) Candidate Forum on Thur (9/29), 5:00 – 7:00 PM in the meeting room at Ermanos (http://www.ermanosbrew.com/).

Three of the five candidates (Tom Chabin, Boyd Dunn & Bill Mundell) have already committed to attend, thanks to Robert Bulechek’s help. I have not heard back yet from the other two candidates (Bob Burns & Andy Tobin), but your involvement might still encourage their participation.

Candidates will provide brief individual presentations (under 5 mins.), followed by their answers to written questions and then a moderated discussion with our well-informed audience of area energy professionals.

We all know that this 2016 ACC election is critical to Arizona’s future, so I hope that you can join us and distribute this invitation freely to others who might be interested.

Please RSVP by 9/22, if possible, so we can accommodate everyone who wants to attend. Doug (520-250-2553)

The ABCs of the ACC: A Full Run-down of the Arizona Corporation Commission

We’re all familiar with the role of the ACC in setting our electricity rates. Many of you were probably at the ACC public hearing in Tucson on August 31 and may even have given testimony about TEP’s rate case now before the Commission. But do you know the full range of what the ACC does?

The Arizona Corporation Commission, known as the “4th branch of government in Arizona,” impacts our lives and the economy of the state in many ways — not just our utility rates. This meeting will provide an overview of all aspects of the ACC’s work. In November, we’ll be voting for candidates to fill three seats on the Commission, and this program will help ensure that we’re all informed voters as we make that decision.

Join Sustainable Tucson for our September Monthly Meeting, presented in collaboration with Sierra Club Grand Canyon Chapter. Speakers (confirmed to date) will be Sandy Bahr and Dan Millis.

Meeting Date: September 12, 2016
St. Mark’s Presbyterian Church, in Geneva Hall, at 3809 E. 3rd St. (west of Alvernon, south of Speedway).
Doors open at 5:30 pm; program begins at 6:00 pm
Free parking in the church lots off 2nd St. (preferred) and 3rd St.

Speak Up for Solar! With a Change of Date, Change of Location

Join Sustainable Tucson for our monthly August meeting, focusing on rooftop solar and getting the community ready for the upcoming Aug 31 ACC hearing in Tucson on TEP’s rate request. The meeting will start with the movie “Catching the Sun”, followed by current information on TEP’s request, with background on rate requests by other utilities, the expected effect of the rate request — if approved — on all customers and the projected impact on the spread of rooftop solar in the region. Along with what to expect at the ACC hearing, the meeting will include the opportunity for letter-writing, to share our position on the rate request.

NOTE CHANGE of DATE, CHANGE of LOCATION, EARLY START TIME for this meeting!
August 22, 2016 Doors open 5:15 pm, Program starts 5:45 pm (to allow enough time for the movie)
St. Mark’s Presbyterian Church, 3809 E 3rd St, Tucson, AZ (just west of Alvernon)
Free parking in church lots on 3rd St. and 2nd St.

………………………..

Save the Date! September 12
The September Monthly Meeting will again be held at St. Mark’s Presbyterian Church.
Presented jointly with Sierra Club Grand Canyon Chapter:
The ABCs of the ACC: Understanding the Arizona Corporation Commission

Minimalism

Some of the themes from A Simpler Way will be explored in Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things in Life, for which Sustainable Tucson will be a Community Partner with The Loft Cinema, on July 19th at 7:30pm. This film looks at living minimally in all aspects of life, from our interaction with the environment to business, from music to design and architecture. As the film’s website explains, “minimalism is a lifestyle that helps people question what things add value to their lives—clearing the clutter from life’s path so we can make room for the most important things.” The film “explores various recipes for how to live a more meaningful, deliberate life. Not a perfect life, not an easy life—a simple one.”

A panel discussion after the film will include Tucson architect Frank Mascia, who is featured in the film.

For more information:

The Loft Cinema is located at 3233 E. Speedway Blvd., Tucson. Stop by the Sustainable Tucson table before the film.

A Simpler Way: Crisis as Opportunity

July Monthly Meeting – Movie night
This month’s Sustainable Tucson meeting be a showing of A Simpler Way: Crisis as Opportunity, a recently released feature-length documentary that follows an intentional community in Australia who came together to explore and demonstrate a simpler way to live in response to global crises. Throughout the year presented in the film, the group builds tiny houses, plants veggie gardens, explores their understanding of simple living, and discovers the challenges of living in community. Interspersed with segments showing how the community developed are shorts interviews with permaculture specialists, economists, authors, and other scholars, who explore those global crises and with the changes we all need to make in addressing them.

Written and produced by Jordan Osmond, founder of Happen Films, and Dr. Samuel Alexander, co-director of the Simplicity Institute, A Simpler Way was made on a limited budget, all of it crowdfunded by its many supporters. Here, Osmond writes of the motivation behind the film:

“The dominant mode of global development today seeks to universalize high-consumption consumer lifestyles, but this has produced perverse inequalities of wealth and – to an extent that is no longer possible to ignore – is environmentally catastrophic. We are called on to take shorter showers, recycle, buy ‘green’ products, and turn the lights off when we leave the room, but these measures are grossly inadequate. We need more fundamental change – personally, culturally, and structurally.

“The purpose of the documentary is to envision a way of life that positively responds to the overlapping global crises of climate change, peak oil, economic collapse, and consumerism. Genuine progress today means building a new, more resilient world based on permaculture, simple living, renewable energy, and localized economies. Most of all, we need to reimagine the good life beyond consumer culture and begin building a world that supports a simpler way of life. This does not mean hardship or deprivation. It means focusing on having enough, for everyone, forever.”

Please join us for this exciting film and for discussion afterwards addressing implications for our own lives and for our community here in Tucson and Southern Arizona.

As always, the meeting is at the downstairs meeting room of the
Downtown Main Library, 101 N Stone.
Doors open at 5:30. Movie starts at 6:00

A Time to Choose

Along with The Loft Cinema and the UA Institute of the Environment, Sustainable Tucson will be co-presenting the film “A Time to Choose,” which will be shown June 15, at 7:30 pm, at The Loft Cinema, 3233 E. Speedway Blvd. Come early and visit with us at the Sustainable Tucson table on the patio. The film addresses worldwide climate change, looking at both the challenges and possible solutions.

For more information: https://loftcinema.com/film/time-to-choose/

Additional reviews (just to entice you to attend):
https://www.washingtonpost.com/goingoutguide/movies/a-time-to-choose-makes-an-eloquent-case-for-acting-to-save-the-planet-now/2016/06/02/433b17b8-2441-11e6-9e7f-57890b612299_story.html

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/la-et-mn-time-to-choose-review-20160531-snap-story.html

Food Resilience — Learning to Adapt, Survive & Thrive in the 21st Century

Of all the things that we could do to make Tucson more resilient — better able to survive and thrive, no matter what the world throws at us — the “lowest hanging fruit” is probably — FOOD. Who woulda thunk it?

Come to the joint meeting of Sustainable Tucson and Ward 3 Neighbors Alliance this coming Monday (June 13 at 6:00) at the Downtown Main Library.

This meeting will focus on what Tucson is already doing to create a beautiful and healthy community that can provide a more secure food supply based on our renewable rainfall, ample land, year-round growing climate, and long tradition of unique local food.

A panel of local experts will discuss what Tucson is already doing that contribute to our food resilience, as well as what we might do to magnify our efforts. The panelists are:
• Nick Henry – Director of the Community Food Bank’s Food Resource Center
• Sarah Brown – Co-coordinator of Watershed Management Group
• Oscar Medina – Changemaker High School teacher in History, Civics, and Urban Agriculture Restorative Ecology
• Carolyn Niethammer – Author on the plants, food, environmet, and people of the Southwest
• Tres English – Director of Sustainable Tucson Food Resilience Project
The panel discussion will be followed by Q&A from the audience.

In addition to the panel, there will be an opportunity to talk with local vendors who are directly involved in local sustainability. Currently confirmed are:
• Tanks Green Stuff
• Iskashitaa Refugee Harvesting Network
• Tucson Organic Gardeners.
• Carolyn Niethammer – Local author on SW food, environment and people

Join us for lively discussion on an important issue facing Tucson.

As always, the doors of the downstairs meeting room open at 5:30 and the program starts promptly at 6:00. Parking is free in the parking garage below the Main Library.

Sustainability and Architecture: USGBC ADVANCE and Tucson’s Prospective 2030 District®

For our May General Meeting, Sustainable Tucson is very pleased to present “Sustainability and Architecture: USGBC ADVANCE and Tucson’s Prospective 2030 District®.” This program will present the innovative partnership between the 2030 Districts and the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)-Arizona Sonoran Branch, with the goal of developing a 2030 District® here in Tucson.

First established in Seattle, 2030 Districts® are unique private/ public partnerships that bring property owners, managers, and developers together with local governments, businesses, and community stakeholders to provide a business model for urban sustainability through collaboration, leveraged financing, and shared resources. Now in 11 other cities across North America, 2030 Districts® are forming to meet the energy, water, and vehicle emissions reduction targets for existing buildings and new construction called for by Architecture 2030 in the 2030 Challenge for Planning.

Here in Tucson, since late January of this year, a growing group of representatives from community environmental organizations, City and County departments, and building professionals have been meeting regularly to explore the development of a 2030 District in Tucson. Initial focus has been on forming a District in the Bonita neighborhood in Menlo Park, but there is also interest in expanding to include downtown Tucson and the U of A. The 2030 Challenge for Planning goals, which need to be adopted to form a District, if successfully met, would result in reducing energy use, water use, and CO2 transportation emissions by 50% District-wide by 2030.

USGBC-Arizona Sonoran Branch members, working together with Architecture 2030 and 2030 Districts® representatives, have formed the Tucson ADVANCE/2030 District Partnership (TADP), in a joint effort to provide free resources and tools such as ENERGY STAR to benchmark, develop, and implement creative strategies, best practices, and verification methods for measuring progress towards the goals of the 2030 Challenge for Planning and the Tucson 2030 District. (See article below for related training event.)

Speakers include:
Peter Dobrovolny: Retired Architect/Planner and 2030 District Advocate. Peter was instrumental in forming the first 2030 District in Seattle and is currently facilitating the exploration of a 2030 District in Tucson
Michael Peel: Community and Government Relations Liaison, Pima Community College. Michael is facilitating the USGBC ADVANCE training that is focused on development of the Tucson ADVANCE Prospective 2030 District.
Ray Clamons: Owner of Xylon Designs Sustainable Architecture & Water Harvesting Landscapes. Ray has produced the concept of the Bonita District – Tucson 2030 District and is currently active in planning for that District.
Joel Loveland: Professor Emeritus University of Washington (UW) School of Architecture and Director, UW Center for Integrated Design; 2030 District Advocate. Joel is currently supporting Peter and Michael in the area of building performance analysis and benchmarking for the emerging 2030 District in Tucson.

Monday, May 9, 2016
Joel D. Valdez Main Library, Lower level Conference room
101 N Stone (lower level parking off Alameda St.)
Program begins at 6:00pm. Doors open at 5:30 for networking.

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS AND YWCA OFFER FREE WORKSHOPS

Is your organization planning to hold a candidate or issue forum this year? If so, you’ll want to attend the free workshops being offered on Saturday, April 30th.

The morning will be devoted to a presentation on how to plan forums, and the afternoon will be on how to moderate forums, with hands-on practice.

Both will be at the YWCA, 525 N. Bonita Avenue. The morning workshop begins at 9 AM, and the afternoon one at 12:30. Light refreshments provided; if you’re staying for the full day, bring a bag lunch or purchase food on site. You can register for one or both workshops at the League’s website at www.lwvgt.org or call 520/327-7652.

Just Transitions: Energy, Water and Local Economic Development on the Navajo Nation

Jihan Gearon is Executive Director of Black Mesa Water Coalition (BMWC), whose environmental justice/economic development work focuses on a region of the Navajo nation called Black Mesa. BMWC’s mission is to build a Just Transition away from the fossil fuel based economy of the Navajo Nation towards a green economy that uplifts the traditional economy, and honors the culture and health of the Navajo people.

BMWC success include: shutting down the Black Mesa Mine and Mojave Generating Station; establishing the first of its kind Navajo Green Economy Fund and Commission; founding the Southwest Indigenous Leadership Institute for youth; securing a revolving fund for renewable energy projects from the California Public Utilities Commission; halting the Navajo-Hopi Little Colorado Water Settlement Agreement and Act, and developing key local economic projects such as Black Mesa Solar Project, Food Sovereignty Project, and Navajo Wool Market Improvement Project.
Join us for a

Presentation * Panel Discussion * Q & A
at Changemaker High School – 1300 S Belevedere Ave
Light refreshments at 5:30 PM.

Co-sponsored by: Black Mesa Water Coalition, Sierra Club, Green for All, Center for Biological Diversity, Changemaker High School, Rising Tide – North America, Tierra Y Libertad

For more information/RSVP: Michelle Crow * 975-8443 or michelle@crowcomm.com

“Catching the Sun” New Film Screening

You are invited to a screening of the new film “Catching the Sun” on Friday, April 22nd at 7pm at Casa Video Film Bar at 2905 E Speedway Blvd.

Catching The Sun is a feature length documentary that explores the global race to a clean energy future. The event will be done by donation, as Tucson Solar Punk is fronting the cost for distribution rights. Check out the Trailer at catchingthesun.tv.

The film follows the hope and heartbreak of unemployed American workers seeking jobs in the solar industry, and sheds light on the path to an economically just and environmentally sustainable future. Set against the struggle to build a ‘green economy’, Catching the Sun will engage new audiences in solutions to climate change and income inequality. Please spread the word to others among your networks.

I hope to see you at the theater!

We Need to Electrify As Much Transportation As We Can – Heinberg

We Need to Electrify As Much Transportation As We Can

by Richard Heinberg

Transcript:

JESSICA DESVARIEUX, PRODUCER, TRNN: Welcome to the Real News Network. I’m Jessica Desvarieux in Baltimore.

Folks are lining up to reserve electric car automaker Tesla’s Model 3. It’s considered to be one of the first electric cars for the mass market at an expected price tag of 35 thousand dollars. Tesla’s CEO, Elon Musk, will be unveiling the vehicle on Thursday evening, so we can’t show you what it will actually look like. But in this segment we wanted to get beyond the consumerism and ask, will this be a game changer for the automobile industry in America and the environment?

Now joining us to help us answer that question is Richard Heinberg. He’s a senior fellow at the Post Carbon Institute. Thanks so much for joining us, Richard.

RICHARD HEINBERG: It’s a pleasure, Jessica.

DESVARIEUX: So, Richard, why has it taken so long for an affordable electric car to sort of come to the market? I’m reminded of the 2006 documentary “Who Killed the Electric Car?” which really highlights how we essentially went from having electric cars on California roads in the ’90s to then, eventually, shredding and destroying those very same vehicles years later. So my question to you, Richard, is, who killed the electric car?

HEINBERG: Well, the bosses at the Detroit automakers decided back in the 1990s that there wouldn’t be a mass market for the electric car because of the short range of the vehicles. They thought consumers wouldn’t buy a car if it didn’t have a two to three hundred mile range, and the batteries at that time were not capable of delivering that kind of range. So even though they built some prototypes and sent them out to drivers, they never produced a mass market car.

Today, battery technology has improved enough so that it is possible to produce an electric car for the masses with at least a 200-mile range, and that’s what’s anticipated for the Tesla Model 3.

DESVARIEUX: Okay. there are some folks that are saying that this isn’t as big of a game changer as people are making it out to be, because essentially you’re getting power to charge your electric vehicle from fossil fuel sources like coal. Do you agree with that?

HEINBERG: Not entirely. First of all, the energy mix is different in different parts of the country. Some parts of the country, electricity is mostly coming from coal. In other parts of the country the mix is more oriented toward natural gas, hydro and renewables. So, first of all, it depends on where you’re getting your electricity from.

And second, you know, if you look out at the energy transition that we’re just beginning right now, away from fossil fuels toward renewables, it’s clear that one of the main strategies that we’ll have to pursue during this energy transition is electrification. Right now only about 20 percent of the final energy that we use in the United States is in the form of electricity. The rest is in the form of liquid fuels for transportation, energy for high heat industrial processes and so on.

We have to electrify as much of that energy usage as we can, because most of our renewable sources of energy produce electricity. That’s true of solar and wind, geothermal and hydro power. So we need to electrify as much transportation as we can.

DESVARIEUX: Okay. You have some automakers, you know, really touting this as a bright future, that we’re going to see more and more electric cars hit the market. I want to ask you about the role of cheap oil. Do you think that threatens he growth of the electric car industry?

HEINBERG: Well, probably not over the long run. We’re headed toward electric cars one way or the other, I think. However, over the short run it definitely takes some wind out of the sails, because from the consumer’s standpoint the biggest draw for an electric car is that over the lifetime of ownership the operating costs are much lower, so if you have cheap gas that changes that differential a bit, so that there’s not as much of an advantage.

DESVARIEUX: Okay, let’s talk about the future. What would a truly green transportation system look like, and are there some states or countries that are really laying out a road map to get us there?

HEINBERG: Well, a truly green transportation system probably wouldn’t rely on electric cars that much because it wouldn’t be relying on cars that much. Cars are an inherently inefficient mode of transportation. I mean, think about it. Most cars just have a driver and maybe one passenger, and meanwhile you’re dragging around two tons of metal, glass and plastic in order to get those one or two people where they want to go.

Much more efficient modes of transportation are light rail, any kind of public transportation, actually. So what we really need is to build up more rail transport and get people walking and bicycling as much as possible.

DESVARIEUX: Okay. Richard Heinberg, thank you so much for joining us.

HEINBERG: It’s been a pleasure. Thanks, Jessica.

DESVARIEUX: And thank you for joining us on the Real News Network.

DISCLAIMER: Please note that transcripts for The Real News Network are typed from a recording of the program. TRNN cannot guarantee their complete accuracy.

Electric car teaser image via shutterstock. Reproduced at Resilience.org with permission.


Content on this site is subject to our fair use notice.

Resilience is a program of Post Carbon Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping the world transition away from fossil fuels and build sustainable, resilient communities.


Source URL: http://www.resilience.org/stories/2016-04-04/we-need-to-electrify-as-much-transportation-as-we-can

ST April General Mtg – Tucson’s Energy-Economy-Climate Revolution

Sustainable Tucson’s April General Meeting will provide an up-to-the-minute update on efforts to pave the way for creating a positive energy-economy-climate future for our region.

Tucson-based international economist Skip Laitner will report for the RENEW team on this important three-part community initiative. These include 1) intervening in the Arizona Corporation Commission’s current energy rate cases for southern Arizona; 2) high-level discussions with senior Tucson Electric Power staff; and 3) building community support for a sane and prosperous energy future.

RENEW (Ratepayers Expect New Economic Wisdom) is a collaboration of Tucson-based individuals, groups, and businesses who have begun the hard discussion of positive strategies that might strengthen the region’s economy at the same time we transition to clean, renewable energy sources.

Monday, April 11, 2016
Downtown Library, 101 N Stone
Lower level Conference room.
Program begins at 6:00pm. Doors open at 5:30

 

Historic Broadway widening links and articles

“Intro to Broadway Widening Project – Who What, When, Why: Why Are We Spending $74 Million and Destroying 30 Buildings in a Central Historic Area while Producing No Traffic Improvement?”

Overview and background, an intro for people who are learning about the situation. By Dave Bilgray.

http://www.sustainabletucson.org/2016/03/intro-to-broadway-project-who-what-when-why-why-why/

 

An excellent OpEd by Tucson architect Bob Vint on how Historic Broadway should be designed:
http://tucson.com/news/opinion/column/guest/robert-vint-broadway-renovation-plan-needs-a-redo/article_7100d70a-8844-5150-873c-cb6d6d230f98.html

 

“Broadway widening WILL NOT speed cars…or buses…or pedestrians…or even bicycles!”

Details about minimal benefits, and RTA text showing that job doesn’t need to be done. By Les Pierce.

http://www.sustainabletucson.org/2016/03/data-crunched-broadway-widening-will-not-speed-cars-or-buses-or-pedestrians-or-even-bicycles/

 

“City’s April 2016 Plan differs from Previous Recommendations and Adoptions”

Differences between base alignment, as agreed to by Citizen Task Force and Mayor and Council, and specifications produced by City staff and consultants.

By Broadway Coalition

http://www.sustainabletucson.org/?p=8029

 

“Impacts of the Broadway Widening”

Various impacts on neighborhoods and Tucson overall. By Diana Lett.

http://www.sustainabletucson.org/2016/03/10-impacts-of-the-proposed-broadway-widening/

 

“Has HDR Engineers done what they were hired to do?”

Scope of work by consulting firm, as specified by Mayor and Council, and as actually done. By Margot Garcia.

http://www.sustainabletucson.org/2016/03/has-hdr-engineers-done-what-they-were-hired-to-do/

 

“Broadway project draft Design Concept Report”

City document with basic project design

bar graph showing 6-second traffic improvement is on page 5.9, which is page 77 in the pdf.

http://broadwayboulevard.info/pdf/Broadway-DCR-Public-Review-FullDoc-120815.pdf

 

Parsons-Brinckerhoff 1987 “Broadway Corridor Transportation Study”

referenced in Les Pierce’s writeup.

see Table 3, page 10, which is page 16 of pdf, for compared expectations of various roadway configuration options

says that intersections should be 14-16 lanes wide, on page 10, which is page 16 in the pdf.

https://www.tucsonaz.gov/files/transportation/broadwaycorridortransstudy.pdf

 

Link to the Broadway Coalition Petition drive to oppose the City’s unnecessary alignment plan:

http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/develop-historic-broadway-not-wastefully-widen-the

 

Copy of the Petition as a PDF to distribute:

Copy Broadway Petition

 

400 Comments regarding the Broadway widening from the community recorded during the current Petition Drive :

Broadway Petition Comments

Intro to Broadway Project – Who, What, When, Why?

Why Are We Spending $74 Million

and

Destroying 30 Buildings in a Central Historic Area

while

Producing No Traffic Improvement?

 

The Broadway Improvement Project is not needed, and will provide no benefit to the residents of Tucson.  The City’s own data shows that widening Broadway will provide only a 6-second improvement in travel time.

 

The City of Tucson wants to bulldoze dozens of buildings, many of them historically significant, to handle nonexistent traffic increases which were projected 30 years ago, but did not materialize.

 

The effort started in the 80s, when City analysts predicted a substantial increase in Broadway traffic by 2005. This began a decades-long push to widen Broadway, despite a consulting firm’s analysis that widening would not improve traffic flow.  The reason is the delays at intersections.  The City got funding for the project in 2006, as part of the Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) proposition.

 

But the traffic increase didn’t happen, for two reasons:

 

1. Population growth, which had been primarily to the East, went to the Northwest instead.

2. Aviation Parkway was completed in the 90s, providing an alternative for residents in Southeast Tucson.

 

In 2009, a consultant’s study showed that Broadway traffic was essentially unchanged since the 80s. That should have squelched the project. But the City said it was obligated to do the job, because voters approved it as part of the RTA. (Not true. The RTA proposition said a change in the plan was permitted if there was “no degradation in performance”. That 6-second difference is 1 percent, which would certainly be within the limit.)

 

So the City’s plans continued. The original design was for widening Broadway to 8 lanes, 150 feet wide. That’s half the length of a football field. More than 100 structures would be demolished, mostly locally-owned businesses, including nearly everything on the North side of Broadway, from Euclid to Country Club.

 

There was strong opposition by thousands of citizens and several neighborhood associations.  This resulted in creation of a citizen’s task force, with representatives from business, neighborhood, and disabled communities. Between June 2012 and May 2015, the task force held 37 design meetings, coordinated by City staff and consultants. There were 5 Open Houses, each attended by several hundred people, and five Business and Property Owner Meetings.

 

In late 2014, a compromise was reached between the City, RTA, and task force, calling for 6 lanes, with an estimated 10-12 buildings to be torn down. City agencies and consultants were to work out technical details.

 

We have now received the revised plan. It calls for at least 30 buildings to be demolished — triple the City’s compromise estimate — including 2 blocks of houses in Rincon Heights.  Many other buildings will become inaccessible, and will likely be destroyed, because their driveways and/or parking lots will be wiped out.  There also are changes at intersections which impact nearby neighborhoods, by diverting or blocking traffic flow.

 

Will the Broadway Corridor be a gateway to our revitalized downtown, with locally-owned businesses, and human scale?  Or will it be a wide swath of asphalt, straddled by empty lots and the dream of big box stores?

 

Tucson got a black eye with Rio Nuevo.  Let’s not do it again.  The money can be spent on sidewalks, landscaping, and ADA compliance, which would enhance the area. Please tell your City Council member to reject this wasteful and harmful idea, once and for all.

 

For more info:   www.sustainabletucson.org     www.facebook.com/broadwaycoalition

 

Thanks to Margot Garcia, for providing background and chronological information; Les Pierce, for identifying important items in City and RTA documents; and Bob Cook, for wording suggestions.

Has HDR Engineers done what they were hired to do?

Has HDR Engineers done what they were hired to do?

Here is the scope of work

The phrases below are excerpted from the 2011 Scope of Work issued by COT Dept. of Procurement for the Broadway Project used to issue the contract to HDR Engineering.

 

The consultant is to establish

  • “an innovative and context sensitive, solutions-oriented approach toward the redesign of this major roadway…
  • the selected team will redesign Broadway into a multi-modal boulevard using a variety of land use strategies to preserve historic structures…..
  • Project development should include utilization of innovative urban design, streetscape, xeriscape and environmental sustainability concepts to promote a vibrant, green, and liveable urban character….
  • consideration should be given to…long term transit development; the value of mid-century and other historic properties along the corridor; …and residential district location, form, and design.
  • Part of this project will consider how to enhance transit capability and how planning and design of facilities can increase ridership as well as foster future development of a streetcar, or light-rail system.”

 

They haven’t done any of this.

City Council, Send the design back and tell them to do what they were hired to do!!!

City’s April 2016 Plan differs from Previous Recommendations and Adoptions

There are large differences from the base alignment that the Citizen Task Force (CTF) recommended and the Mayor and Council adopted in May 2015. They are:

 

1.     Many more buildings, historic and businesses, will be acquired and demolished. It appears to be at a minimum around 30, not the 10 to 12 promised earlier.

2.     It takes out the front line of the Rincon Heights Neighborhood Historic District: two blocks of houses.

3.     Other businesses will be acquired: south side block from old Table Talk to end of that row because of no access; same for Solot Plaza.

4.     There are double left turn lanes both directions at Euclid – encouraging traffic past Tucson High School and along the periphery of the University.

5.     There are 11 bus pullouts – these slow down transit, therefore this design does not enhance transit, but makes it worse than now.

6.     There are double left turn lanes onto Campbell/Kino, making that intersection 9 lanes wide – a nightmare for pedestrians trying to get to Starbucks, Carls Junior, or the Safeway or to transfer bus lines.

7.     Extends medians past neighborhood streets, preventing left  turns. Examples: Mountain Ave, Fremont, Olson, Smith, Camino Espanol.

 

Therefore we find the 30% drawings are unacceptable because they:

 

••Do not adhere, even conceptually, to the alignment passed by Mayor & Council on June 9, 2015 and by Citizens Task Force on May 7, 2015.

••Destroy historic streetscape

••Destroy too many businesses, and thus, the essence of Broadway as a destination

••Are hostile to pedestrian and bicyclist road users

••Have too many bus pullouts, slowing down the busses

••Deny parking and access to existing businesses, thus threaten total acquisition of more properties than currently planned

••Do not support local existing businesses

••Impede access to neighborhoods

••Are automobile-centered, at the expense of a more livable Tucson

••Create remnant parcels that are too small to be used by themselves

••Do not contribute to a sense of place

••Do not adhere to current best practices in road design

••Removes right hand turn lanes from WB and EB Broadway at Country Club creating terrible opportunity for bicycle-car accidents. Using 10-foot lanes would allow a right-hand turn lane without changing overall roadway width.

 

Broadway Coalition – March 2016

10 Impacts of the Proposed Broadway Widening

1) The current alignment (the 30% design) ignores public input, which overwhelmingly advocated for preservation of the historic streetscape and local businesses.

 

2) The 30% design defies the direction of Mayor and Council, who approved an alignment that would have caused the loss of at most 11 historic buildings. The proposed 30% design will take out 30 historic buildings.

 

3) The entire project is based on traffic projections that are 20 years out of date. Current data show steady decreases in vehicular traffic on Broadway, on Tucson’s other arterials, and on arterials throughout the nation.

 

4) The project is estimated to cost $74 million, before cost overruns. At this time, cost overruns are expected to be at least $5 million. Our city government is in a budget crisis. Where, exactly, is this money supposed to come from? Coincidentally, the city plans to put tax increases on November’s ballot.

 

5) The city’s own data show that, after the project is completed, traffic will move 6 seconds faster. Yes, you read that correctly: SIX SECONDS. We are supposed to sacrifice two blocks of historic homes, numerous local businesses, go into debt, and tolerate a corrupt public process for SIX SECONDS.

 

6) By destroying local businesses along the Broadway Corridor, the city is sacrificing future tax revenues for the city itself and for the Rio Nuevo District. This will only deepen our budget crisis.

 

7) The city and county keep saying they are respecting the will of the voters by going forward with this project. Well, I voted for the RTA. I held my nose over the road widening projects, because I wanted to see light rail come to Tucson. I never imagined the devastation road widening would bring to historic neighborhoods along Broadway and Grant Road. THIS IS NOT WHAT I VOTED FOR.

 

8) If your neighborhood borders an arterial, this project is a horrible template that could be applied to you. For example, the city has long planned additional widening of Speedway in Feldman’s Neighborhood. The Major Streets and Routes Plan specifies a right-of-way of 125 feet along Speedway in Feldman’s. The city can (and usually does) require any property owner wanting a zoning variance along Speedway to deed the 125 feet over to the city — for free. That is a policy that drives urban blight, just as it did on Broadway.

 

9) This project is the exact opposite of everything that makes a city such as Austin or Portland attractive, livable, economically and culturally viable. There will be no dedicated transit lanes. Little or no landscaping. No replacement parking for the parking that local businesses will lose, meaning those businesses will likely go under. And of course, none of the beautiful amenities that were envisioned early on in the process, such as pocket parks and vegetation buffers between vehicles and cyclists.

 

10) This project is also the exact opposite of government accountability and transparency. In addition to the end-run around public input and direction from Mayor and Council, there have been allegations of early buyouts offered to national chain businesses (looking at you, Starbucks and Brake Masters) that were not necessary, given the alignment, and were far more generous than anything offered to local businesses.

 

 

Sustainability on the Chopping Block – Tucson City Council Decision April 19th

XXX

This is an urgent appeal to the Sustainability Community to show up and speak out for sustainability and reject an unnecessary road widening plan which will cost millions and do nothing for sustainable mobility and economic vitality.

XXXXX

We have limited opportunities to help shape decisions about urban form and public infrastructure which effect the way we live and generate climate-changing GHG emissions. This is one of them.

XXX

 

The Tucson Mayor and Council will decide at their April 19th Regular Meeting on how to proceed with the 30% design proposal on the table. We urge you to sign the popular “Vote No” petition below sponsored by the Broadway Coalition and ALSO submit your “negative” comments on the 30% Design here at the City’s website.

XXX

When: Tuesday, April 19th,  5:30 pm

Where:  Tucson City Hall Council Chambers

We Should Develop Historic Broadway NOT wastefully widen the roadway!

 

Say YES to smart development and NO to another bad alignment plan for Broadway. Why would we spend $75 million for no appreciable improvement in traffic?

 

On April 19th, the City of Tucson will vote whether to:

XXX

1) Widen Historic Broadway even though traffic hasn’t increased for 20 years,

2) Demolish 30+ buildings and businesses, and

3) Ignore the community’s overwhelming plea to design a vibrant, history and place-preserving, climate-friendly future where local businesses thrive and more people prefer to safely walk, bike, and use public transit.

XXX

The City’s alignment plan would set a horrible precedent for our economic future!

XXX

We need to stop wasteful public spending on unnecessary widening of roads when we need to:

XXX

1) Revitalize our historic places leading into Downtown Tucson.

2) Repave our unsafe, crumbling Tucson streets and roads.

3) Invest in alternatives to more cars – walking, biking, public transit.

4) Encourage and enable use of renewable energy – electric vehicles, Street Car extensions.

Our Petition Campaign has exceeded the first goal of 1,000 signatures with over 400 comments. Please add your name, comment if you like, and see what other Tucsonan’s are saying:

 

Time for Action is Now!

 

For background on Broadway Widening , references, articles, and research go here:

 

 

Why Are We Spending $74 Million

and

Destroying 30 Buildings in a Central Historic Area

while

Producing No Traffic Improvement?

By Dave Bilgray

 

 

The Broadway Improvement Project is not needed, and will provide no benefit to the residents of Tucson.  The City’s own data shows that widening Broadway will provide only a 6-second improvement in travel time.

 

The City of Tucson wants to bulldoze dozens of buildings, many of them historically significant, to handle nonexistent traffic increases which were projected 30 years ago, but did not materialize.

 

The effort started in the 80s, when City analysts predicted a substantial increase in Broadway traffic by 2005. This began a decades-long push to widen Broadway, despite a consulting firm’s analysis that widening would not improve traffic flow.  The reason is the delays at intersections.  The City got funding for the project in 2006, as part of the Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) proposition.

 

But the traffic increase didn’t happen, for two reasons:

 

1. Population growth, which had been primarily to the East, went to the Northwest instead.

2. Aviation Parkway was completed in the 90s, providing an alternative for residents in Southeast Tucson.

 

In 2009, a consultant’s study showed that Broadway traffic was essentially unchanged since the 80s. That should have squelched the project. But the City said it was obligated to do the job, because voters approved it as part of the RTA. (Not true. The RTA proposition said a change in the plan was permitted if there was “no degradation in performance”. That 6-second difference is 1 percent, which would certainly be within the limit.)

 

So the City’s plans continued. The original design was for widening Broadway to 8 lanes, 150 feet wide. That’s half the length of a football field. More than 100 structures would be demolished, mostly locally-owned businesses, including nearly everything on the North side of Broadway, from Euclid to Country Club.

 

There was strong opposition by thousands of citizens and several neighborhood associations.  This resulted in creation of a citizen’s task force, with representatives from business, neighborhood, and disabled communities. Between June 2012 and May 2015, the task force held 37 design meetings, coordinated by City staff and consultants. There were 5 Open Houses, each attended by several hundred people, and five Business and Property Owner Meetings.

 

In late 2014, a compromise was reached between the City, RTA, and task force, calling for 6 lanes, with an estimated 10-12 buildings to be torn down. City agencies and consultants were to work out technical details.

 

We have now received the revised plan. It calls for at least 30 buildings to be demolished — triple the City’s compromise estimate — including 2 blocks of houses in Rincon Heights.  Many other buildings will become inaccessible, and will likely be destroyed, because their driveways and/or parking lots will be wiped out.  There also are changes at intersections which impact nearby neighborhoods, by diverting or blocking traffic flow.

 

Will the Broadway Corridor be a gateway to our revitalized downtown, with locally-owned businesses, and human scale?  Or will it be a wide swath of asphalt, straddled by empty lots and the dream of big box stores?

 

Tucson got a black eye with Rio Nuevo.  Let’s not do it again.  The money can be spent on sidewalks, landscaping, and ADA compliance, which would enhance the area. Please tell your City Council member to reject this wasteful and harmful idea, once and for all.

 

For more info:   www.facebook.com/broadwaycoalition

 

Thanks to Margot Garcia, for providing background and chronological information; Les Pierce, for identifying important items in City and RTA documents; and Bob Cook, for wording suggestions.

Sign online petition for a sustainable Broadway

Data crunched: Broadway widening WILL NOT speed cars…or buses…or pedestrians…or even bicycles!

Analysis of RTA and COT’s own numbers shows widening Broadway will not cut travel times for cars or anyone else.

So why are we spending tens of millions of taxpayer dollars amidst a budget crisis?

(A)  The proposed work will have almost zero (~1.4%) benefit, as the Design Concept Report (DCR) data itself declares.

(B)  Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) requires that “Where a departure from the ballot description is being considered, a performance comparison between the proposed alternative and the original scope of work must show no degradation in performance”.

(C)  Therefore, since functionality for cars will not be improved under ANY widening scenario (4-lane, 6-lane, or 8-lane), less invasive options that improve road functionality for everyone else (pedestrians, bicyclists, transit) will still comport with RTA’s directive while saving scarce tax dollars and must be given urgent and careful consideration.

These points are explored in more depth below.

(1)  The proposed work will have almost zero (~1.1 – 1.4%) benefit.

Broadway draft DCR, page “5.9” (9th page of Chapter 5), figure 5.10 “Travel Time Euclid to Country Club” states that travel time by car* from Euclid to Country Club on the current 2+2+center-turning lane configuration is 7.1 minutes.  Of all the four (4) considered alternatives — 4-lane, 4+2T, 6-lane, and 8-lane — only ONE enables faster travel time over this distance, the 6-lane option.  How much faster?  Six seconds.  A 1.4% improvement, which could be margin of error and not even real.  It should be noted that the 8-lane “ballot language” option actually makes things WORSE, increasing travel time by a full minute.

(* These comments focus on car-centric performance because car/vehicle performance appears to be the only transportation metric being given more than token consideration.  We thus attempt to meet the world halfway.)

Figure 5.11 “Average Speed” on the same page shows the current average car travel speed over the two-mile segment of Broadway between Euclid and Country Club to be 17.4 MPH.  Again, of all the considered alternatives, only the 6-lane option shows any improvement AT ALL, and that is an extremely modest 1.1% increase to 17.6 MPH which, again, could simply be margin of error.  And again, the 8-lane “ballot language” option would have dropped average speed by over two minutes, to 15.2 MPH.

Also, the level-of-service (LOS) predicted from the four (4) presented options shows no real difference between them in terms of overall average performance.  When averaged (where 0 = ‘F’, 1 = ‘E’, 2 = ‘D’, 3 = ‘C’, 4 = ‘B’, and 5 = ‘A’), the LOS data presented on Broadway DCR page 4.18 (54th page of PDF document) yields:

 

(A)  Broadway LOS at PAG 2040 traffic projections, by intersection:

config:  Euclid – Highland – Campbell – Tucson – Country Club – overall

4-lane:  2.17 – 3.33 – 1.75 – 2.00 – 2.08 – 2.26

6-lane:  2.08 – 3.75 – 2.58 – 2.92 – 2.08 – 2.68

4+2T:  1.50 – 2.83 – 2.33 – 2.17 – 2.08 – 2.18

8-lane:  2.50 – 3.58 – 2.75 – 2.83 – 2.00 – 2.73

 

(B)  Broadway LOS at PAG “low growth” traffic projections, by intersection:

config:  Euclid – Highland – Campbell – Tucson – Country Club – overall

4-lane:  2.33 – 3.67 – 1.83 – 2.17 – 2.08 – 2.25

6-lane:  2.17 – 3.75 – 2.50 – 2.92 – 2.00 – 2.22

4T+2:  1.92 – 3.25 – 2.33 – 2.42 – 2.17 – 2.25

8-lane:  2.58 – 3.83 – 2.75 – 3.00 – 2.25 – 3.13

 

It would appear that there is no appreciable overall difference in LOS between the presented options, with all performances but one landing in ‘D’ territory (the 8-lane option under “low growth” projections rates a low ‘C’).  Without current LOS data in the DCR, it is not clear which, if any, of these options would actually improve conditions or by how much.

This should come as no surprise, since the 1987 Parsons-Brinckerhoff Broadway Corridor Study stated (table 3, page 10) that widening Broadway (either to six or to eight lanes) would not improve performance at the Euclid, Campbell, or Country Club intersections AT ALL, and that even the “nuclear option” of installing grade-separated interchanges (GSI’s) at these intersections would only raise performance at Euclid and Campbell from a then level-of-service (LOS) of ‘F’ to ‘D’ (Country Club would not improve, and would stay at the then-current ‘D’).  In the thirty years since, nothing has changed:  none of the nine (9) alternatives contemplated by Parsons in 1987 would effect any appreciable improvement then, and none of the four (4) alternatives presented to the Broadway CTF over the past (almost-) four years will effect any appreciable improvement now.

The 1987 study was purportedly commissioned to address what was projected to be the demands of traffic in 2005.  None of the suggestions made by Parsons has been enacted — aside from intersection changes at Kino Parkway in 1989 and as part of the more recent Park-Euclid realignment, but not on the scale recommended by Parsons — yet the proverbial sky has not fallen, and Broadway remains one of our more easily traversed roads.  The perceived “problem” does not exist to an extent that justifies spending $74 million on a notional “solution” that will make no noticeable difference in average travel time or speed, or to overall throughput.

It is also not clear how a 6-lane Broadway would solve the bottleneck at Fourth/ Congress/ Toole:  northbound Downtown Links, being a 30-MPH four-lane road, will siphon away only a small fraction of the traffic load.  Hurling cars westbound down Broadway will not improve overall road performance, as they will only accumulate and back up faster than Downtown Links and Fourth/ Congress/ Toole can disperse them.  This is likely a moot point given the modest performance gains the Broadway proposal would realize, but if these changes were to move more cars per lane per hour the 6-lane “solution” on Broadway will only create another problem downstream.

This makes all the more puzzling the assertion made in Pima County’s ordinance 2015-10 (which amended its ordinance 1997-80, the Transportation Bond Improvement Plan that includes project DOT-56, “Broadway Boulevard, Euclid Avenue to Campbell”) where the Broadway project benefits were described as:  “The estimated economic value of the improvements to traffic flow and reductions in accidents are $172.85 million.  The benefit/cost ratio is 4.9:1.”  It is not clear how a 1% performance increase (time saved, speed gained) creates $173 million in benefits; in fact, one would expect accidents to rise (in number and/or severity) as speed does.

One must also wonder about end-user sentiment:  for $74 million, drivers would not unreasonably expect to feel a difference in the Broadway commute experience proportionate to such an expenditure.  Six seconds, the best projected outcome possible from among the considered options, is a woefully inadequate consolation prize.

 

(2)  RTA requires that “Where a departure from the ballot description is being considered, a performance comparison between the proposed alternative and the original scope of work must show no degradation in performance”.

As discussed above, an 8-lane configuration of Broadway would either have no effect on traffic conditions (Parsons-Brinckerhoff, 1987) or would make them worse (time and speed comparison charts, DCR page 5.9).  Leaving things at status quo would yield better traffic performance results than inflicting the “ballot language” option.

 

(3)  Therefore, since functionality for cars will not be improved under ANY widenening scenario, less invasive options that improve road functionality for everyone else (pedestrians, bicyclists, transit) must be given urgent and careful consideration.

DCR states (page 5.18) that “It is not an option to leave the roadway as it is — the City will have to improve the roadway per Federal [Americans with Disabilities Act] requirements, and there is no money to do so”.  The inadequate pedestrian and bicyclist facilities on Broadway need to be improved in any event; the low incidence of bicycle traffic on Broadway is likely for the same reason there are few bicyclists on I-10, i.e., bicyclists were simply not considered when the road was last expanded.  As our mindsets evolve from “one mode” transportation to handling all modes, so too will our roads.

If getting an ADA-compliant street* is in fact the only reason this project is moving forward — and it is difficult to draw any other conclusion, given the negligible benefits on offer — there are, and have been suggested by the CTF and the public, other alignment options that will improve functionality for pedestrian and bicyclist road users, lay the foundation for future transit improvements, and also preserve much more of the surrounding built environment for historic, commercial, and/or residential purposes.

 

(* One wonders, though, how a medianized roadway that forces wheelchair users to go blocks out of their way to cross Broadway at one of a handful of wheel-able crossings comports with ADA’s goals of equality of access.  Pedestrian travel and community connections are not just along Broadway, but across it.)

Given the current budget constraints under which City, County, and RTA are operating, it is only prudent to review what a project area truly needs, what any proposed “solution” will actually effect, and reduce the project scope accordingly.  With $74 million earmarked for Broadway, negligible projected benefit from the proposed Broadway changes, and more pressing transportation needs elsewhere, we urge a rigorous and unflinching value analysis of the current proposal and implementation of less-invasive less costly measures to create a Broadway that works for midtown and all of Tucson.

Thank you for your time and attention.

 

SOURCES AND DOCUMENTS:

Broadway project draft Design Concept Report — http://broadwayboulevard.info/pdf/Broadway-DCR-Public-Review-FullDoc-120815.pdf — (~48MB, 118 pages, PDF format)

Parsons-Brinckerhoff, 1987 Broadway Corridor Transportation Study —https://www.tucsonaz.gov/files/transportation/broadwaycorridortransstudy.pdf — (~1.67 MB, 39 pages, PDF format) — see specifically Table 3, page 10 (16th page of PDF document) for compared expectations of various roadway configuration options

1989 Kino/Broadway intersection widening — https://www.tucsonaz.gov/apps/maps-and-records/webroot/images/Plan_Lib/1988/I/I-88-035A/i-88-035a_013.tif — (~227KB, TIFF format)

County ordinance 1997-80, Transportation Bond Improvement Plan, plus subsequent amendments — http://webcms.pima.gov/cms/one.aspx?portalId=169&pageId=7610

09-APR-2015 County ordinance 2015-10, amending the 1997 Transportation Bond Improvement Plan —http://webcms.pima.gov/common/pages/UserFile.aspx?fileId=194763 — (~529KB, 48 pages, PDF format) — and describing the possible benefits of widening Broadway (page “40”, 45th page of PDF document)

19-OCT-2010 County ordinance 2010-62, amending the 1997 Transportation Bond Improvement Plan —http://pima.ecustomdev.intrafinity.com/common/pages/UserFile.aspx?fileId=9400 — (~195KB, five pages, PDF format) — including redline of River Road Ventana Wash project wording

Past roadway projects that seemed like a good idea at the time and, as history has proven, were best left on the drawing board —https://www.arizonaroads.com/urban/index.html — (Tucson’s marvels are ~2/3ds from the top), since we would be so much poorer as a City without Armory Park or the Campbell Avenue mercantile district

 

Thanks to Les Pierce for diligently compiling the documentation and lucidly stating the case.

Attached please find additional files that may be helpful.  The first two are 1987 Parsons-Brinckerhoff documents (the Broadway study and the “concept plan”); the three one-pagers are summaries/ graphic illos of my previous warblings about how the performance data clearly states (and has stated) that this project ain’t gonna solve whatever “problems” Broadway is alleged to have.  Caveat that the LOS page is a bit cluttered, but it should still work.

Cheers,

Les.

bway_conceptplan_parsons_198702

bway_study_parsons_198702

bway_dcr_los_table_201512.eps

bway_dcr_perf_graphs_201512.eps

bway_study_parsons_198702_los_table3

 

CALL TO ACTION!

XXX

Why would we spend $75 million for no appreciable improvement in traffic?

XXX

The City of Tucson is proposing to:

XXX

1)   Widen Historic Broadway even though traffic hasn’t increased for 20 years,

2)  Demolish 30+ buildings and businesses, and

3)  Ignore the community’s plea to design for a vibrant, history and place-preserving, climate-friendly future where local businesses thrive and more people prefer to safely walk, bike, and use public transit.

XXX

This plan is a horrible precedent for our future!

We have to stop spending on what we don’t need so we can invest in what we do need!

XXX

Dear City of Tucson:

XXX

Don’t Waste Taxpayer Money We Don’t Have.

Do Broadway Right Or Not At All!

XXX

People of Tucson:

 Show up at the Public Open House

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Time: 5:30-8:00

Sabbar Shrine Temple

450 S. Tucson Boulevard

This is the time and place to comment on the 30% alignment drawings. This plan sets in motion Real Estate beginning to buy properties. There may be small changes, but by in large this is it!

 

There are large differences from the base alignment that the Citizen Task Force (CTF recommended) and the Mayor and Council adopted in May 2015. They are:

1.     Many more buildings  – historic and businesses will be acquired and demolished. It appears to be at a minimum – 30, not the 10-12 promised earlier.

2.     It takes out the front line of the Rincon Heights Neighborhood Historic District – 2 blocks of houses.

3.     Other businesses will be acquired – south side block from old Table Talk to end of that row because of no access, same for Solot Plaza.

4.     There are double left turn lanes both directions at Euclid – encouraging traffic past Tucson High School and along the periphery of the University

5.     There are 11 bus pullouts – these slow down transit, therefore this design does not enhance transit, but makes it worse than now.

6.     There are double left turn lanes onto Campbell/Kino making that intersection 9 lanes wide – a nightmare for pedestrians trying to get to Starbucks, Carls Junior, or the Safeway or transfer buses.

7.     Extends medians past neighborhood streets preventing left hand turns – examples: Mountain Ave, Fremont, Olson, Smith, Camino Espanol

Therefore we find the 30% drawings are unacceptable because they:

 

  •     *do not adhere, even conceptually, to the alignment passed by Mayor & Council on June 9, 2015 and by Citizens Task Force May 7, 2015.
  •     *destroy historic streetscape
  •     *destroy too many businesses, and thus, the essence of Broadway as a destination
  •     *are pedestrian and bicyclist hostile
  •     *have too many bus pullouts, slowing down the busses
  •     *deny parking and access to existing businesses, thus threaten total acquisition
  •     *impede access to neighborhoods
  •     *are automobile-centered, at the expense of a more livable Tucson
  •     *do not adhere to current best practices in road design

Comments can be given at the Open House

Comments can be sent via email at www.broadwayboulevard.info/comments.php

Maps can be found at www.broadwayboulevard.info/planning

TAKE ACTION NOW!

Public Hearing at City Council Meeting on 30% alignment set for Tuesday, April 5, 2016.

 

For an excellent summary of studies which show that widening historic Broadway is unneessary, click here.

 

Feeding Tucson Food Resilience meeting

Following the successful Urban Farm Tour on March 5, we will be meeting on Wednesday, March 23 to continue the discussion. The objective of the meeting is to identify next steps to help make Tucson more Food Resilient. We will consider two possible projects:

• Develop a grant application to the new Haury foundation for startup funds to help start to develop a Food Resilience Project. Ultimately, this could result in a coalition of local organizations that will combine their interests and capabilities to help small, self-organizing groups to make them selves more food resilient. If the interest and time is there, we may apply for startup (‘seed’) funds this May. (Or possibly in September.)

* Begin to organize a Food Resilience component for the 6th annual Envision Tucson Sustainable Festival, this October. This would likely include a variation of the Urban Farm Tour from earlier this month.

The meeting will be at the YWCA, 525 N Bonita If you want to buy lunch from the Café @ the YW, you should try to get there a little early. We will start promptly at 11:30.

Climate Change and Pima County Operations

Climate Change and Pima County Operations:

Mitigation and Adaptation through Energy Efficiency, Water Efficiency, and Renewable Energy

The Sustainable Tucson general meeting for March continues this year’s focus on climate change and local impacts and actions.

In Pima County, residents, businesses, and public services primarily rely on energy generated by natural gas and coal-fired thermoelectric plants and on water supplied by the Colorado River and transported by the Central Arizona Project (CAP).

The production and transmission of energy and water supplies are linked, and the costs of these resources are rising as a result of scarcity issues, growing demands. and regulatory uncertainty around renewables. Furthermore, energy and water supplies are vulnerable to the effects of climate variability, such as prolonged drought, which further influence costs. Electricity and water costs for Pima County are projected to rise 10-30% in the coming years. While existing County policies and tools have thus far kept rising costs at bay, new strategies and infrastructure need to be considered in the context of these increasing and compounded risks.

Speakers will include:

Dr. Julie Robinson, Pima County Sustainability Program Manager

Others to be announced.

Presentations will be followed by audience Q&A.

The event will take place in the downstairs conference room of the Joel Valdez Main Library in downtown Tucson. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. for meet & greet begins at 5:30; the program will begin at 6:00.
Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Lower Level Meeting Room
(Free lower level parking off Alameda St.)

Urban Farm Tour

Tucson currently grows millions of pounds of food right in the urban area, but we don’t see it because it comes from many, many places in small quantities.

Now you can join the Feeding Tucson Urban Farm Tour on March 5 to see examples of the future of Tucson’s secure food system.

During this 5-hour tour, participants will visit different sets of aquaponics and hydroponics systems, a long-time urban orchard, market gardens and community gardens. The tour will end at the Mission Garden for a locally-sourced lunch, catered by Caridad Community Kitchen, and a discussion of “What do we need to do to produce and eat lots more local food?”

The March 5 tour is organized by Feeding Tucson, a project of Sustainable Tucson. It is part of our ongoing efforts to create a more sustainable and resilient community.


Tickets are available at the Feeding Tucson website. The $25 charge covers the catered meal and a contribution to Mission Garden.

34th Annual Solar Potluck and Exhibition

Join Citizens for Solar at our Annual Solar Potluck and experience the flavors of solar-cooked food and learn about solar by viewing solar appliances and exhibitions (ovens, fountains, coolers, lights, electrical systems) and solar arts. The event is co-sponsored by Catalina State Park, Arizona State Parks.

The Solar Potluck is an educational, family-friendly event. Learn about solar cooking, solar PV, solar hot water, energy conservation and other “green” topics.

We’ll have speakers and musicians throughout the day on a stage with a PA system powered by solar energy. talk to our vendors and exhibitors, and enter our raffle, where you can win valuable prizes, including a home energy audit and solar ovens. Raffle tickets are available at our concession stand, where we’ll also have Solar Potluck T-shirts and bottled water for sale.

If you are a solar cook, please bring your own solar oven(s) and join us for cooking. The Solar Potluck and Exhibition opens to the public at 10:00 am, but we ask that our solar cooks have their ovens set up by 9:30 am.

The Potluck dinner is at around 5:00 pm. All of our guests are invited to join us at our potluck dinner. It’s not necessary to contribute anything, but we encourage bringing a dish to share. Salads, fruit, desserts and other dishes are always appreciated.

Bring your own eating utensils (plate/bowl and fork/spoon) and help make Tucson’s Solar Potluck a waste-free event. Make sure you wear comfy shoes, a brimmed hat and sunscreen. The festival will be held come sun, rain or wind!

The cost of the Solar Potluck is free; $7/car to get into the Park.

If you have questions or would like more information about the event, please contact Bruce Joseph via email at bjoseph1@comcast.net.

Connect with other Solar Potluck fans on our FaceBook page.

Saturday, April 30, 2016
10:00 am – Sunset
Catalina State Park
(11570 N. Oracle Road, near Mile Post 81)

Local Climate Change Actions: Policy and Progress

Continuing Sustainable Tucson’s theme of “Climate Change and Actions for Our Sustainable Future”, please join us at the February General Meeting to hear about the progress being made locally on the policy and actions front.

Find out what is happening within Tucson City government, Tucson’s Climate Change committee’s upcoming recommendation to establish a new carbon emission goal of “Net-zero carbon emissions by 2040”, and how it can be reinforced by putting a price on carbon emissions through national legislation promoted by the Citizen’s Climate Lobby.

Speakers will include:

  • Ryan Anderson, Planning, Transportation, and Sustainability Policy Advisor, City of Tucson, Office of the Mayor
  • Ben Champion, D.Phil., Director, Office of Sustainability, University of Arizona, Co-chair City of Tucson Climate Change committee
  • Suzanne Tveit, Arizona coordinator, Citizen’s Climate Lobby

Presentations will be followed by audience Q&A.

The event will take place in the downstairs conference room of the Joel Valdez Main Library in downtown Tucson. Meet & greet begins at 5:30; the program will begin at 6:00. Doors open at 5:30 pm.

Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Lower Level Meeting Room,
(Free lower level parking off Alameda St.)

UA Earth Transformed Lecture Series

UA Earth Transformed Lecture Series

A Series of Six Lectures
Exploring Our World and Ourselves

Mondays, January 25 – March 7
7:00-8:00 PM
UA Centennial Hall

Climate change and its impacts are no longer merely abstract projections for the future. Instead, they are on-going and growing challenges for both humans and many of the natural systems upon which we depend. Globally, changes in the oceans, ice sheets and atmosphere provide clear fingerprints of the human causes, but also important lessons for society to learn as we seek solutions. Even more than when the UA Science Lecture Series originally turned to climate change a decade ago, the Southwest is dealing with a looming water crisis, unprecedented severe wildfire risk, emerging human health concerns and much more. Scholars and the public alike need to brainstorm and work to ensure a resilient and vibrant future for the Southwest and the planet.

Lectures are held at Centennial Hall on the campus of the University of Arizona. Parking is available on a pay-per-use basis in the Tyndall Avenue Garage.
All lectures begin at 7:00 PM and are free to the public. Doors open at 6:00 PM. We encourage you to arrive at Centennial Hall before 6:30 PM as seating is limited.
For More Information
Visit the Earth Transformed website or call 520-621-4090.

Upcoming Lectures

Monday, January 25, 2016
The Ocean’s Role in Climate: Heat and Carbon Uptake in the Anthropocene
Joellen Russell, 1885 Society Distinguished Scholar and Associate Professor of Geosciences, College of Science, University of Arizona
The oceans play a key role in shaping the Earth’s climate and its variability on both short and long time scales. Central to this role is the ability of the ocean to store both carbon dioxide and heat, not only at the surface but also in its deepest layers. New technologies are revolutionizing how we study and predict changes in our dynamic oceans.
Monday, February 1, 2016
Climate Change and Global Food Security
David Battisti, Tamaki Endowed Chair and Professor of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington
Increasing stresses on major crops due to climate change, coupled with the increasing demand for food due to increasing population and development, present significant challenges to achieving global food security. This lecture explores the likely impact of climate change and volatility on food production and availability in the foreseeable future.

Monday, February 8, 2016
Ecosystem Resilience: Navigating Our Tenuous Connection to Nature
Russell Monson, Louise Foucar Marshall Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, College of Science, University of Arizona
Sustainability of the services provided by Earth’s ecosystems is dependent on mechanisms of resilience that include maintenance of biotic diversity and avoidance of climatically-controlled ‘tipping points’. This lecture will explore how recent trends in land use and anthropogenic climate warming have exposed vulnerabilities in the mechanisms of ecosystem resilience, and revealed the potential for surprising shifts in the productivity and persistence of ecosystems.

Monday, February 15, 2016
No lecture this week.

Monday, February 22, 2016
Climate Change and Human Health: Impacts and Pathways to Resilience
Kacey Ernst, Associate Professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Arizona
Climate change will inevitably lead to negative impacts on human health. Certainty in predicting negative health outcomes is higher when changes are more directly related to the natural environment. Research is advancing our understanding of these complex systems and how they might be altered under different climatic conditions. Mitigation strategies can be applied now to improve both the current and future health of populations.

Monday, February 29, 2016
Carbon Sequestration: Can We Afford It?
Kimberly Ogden, Professor, Chemical and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Arizona
Carbon sequestration is defined as removing carbon from the atmosphere to mitigate climate change. Although there are commercially available technologies, the main barrier to implementation is economic. This lecture will explore proposed methods for carbon capture from the simple to the complex. The potential of alternative energy to reduce emissions and sequestration using biological processes will be emphasized.

Monday, March 7, 2016
The Changing Earth: It’s Not Just a New Normal
Jonathan Overpeck, Co-Director, Institute of the Environment; Thomas R. Brown Distinguished Professor of Science and Regents’ Professor of Geosciences and Atmospheric Sciences, College of Science, University of Arizona
Climate change is ever-intensifying at scale of the globe, and the Southwest is already dealing with climate change challenges in the form of unusually hot drought, looming water shortage, widespread death of trees, unprecedented severe fire risk, dust storms, hotter heat waves and more. With the economic vitality of the Southwest at stake, climate adaptation and mitigation are key.

Free screening – This Changes Everything

Join Rising Tide Tucson, the Bus Riders Union, and other local groups for a community conversation on climate justice globally and here in Southern AZ. We will be showing Naomi Klein’s new documentary about climate change and grassroots resistance, This Changes Everything.

The film presents seven powerful stores of communities fighting for justice on the front lines of climate change. The film will be followed by a panel discussion on local social and climate justice struggles and how we can get involved!

Join us at the Screening Room
127 E Congress St (right next to Ronstadt Bus Terminal)

Food! Childcare provided on request! Bilingual event.
Win a prize if you walk, bus, or bike to the event.
Contact us at risingtidetucson@gmail.com

What does the Paris Climate Agreement mean for solar in Arizona?

Southern Arizona Regional Solar Partnership Meeting: January 21

The public is invited to this important, free event.

Agenda:
Vince Pawlowski, a recent delegate to COP21, the United Nations Climate Conference in Paris in 2015, will be a guest speaker. Vince, a recent graduate in climate policy from the University of Arizona and part of the UA delegation to the conference, will present a summary of actions taken, the agreement and what it means for solar projects in Tucson and Arizona. The conference looked at setting a framework for action to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Solar is set to play an important role in the plan.
Mark Holohan, president of AriSEIA, Arizona’s Solar Energy Industry Association, will join the meeting by phone and provide an update on the 2016 Arizona Legislature’s activities on solar and discuss TEP’s rate case and other items pending before the Arizona Corporation Commission which will affect solar.
Parking:
Available on nearby streets and in several parking lots, or take the streetcar and get off at the Broadway stop near Stone.
*Construction Alert*
Please be advised that there might be traffic restrictions on Stone Ave. and Broadway Blvd. due to several building construction projects in the area.
Please plan your trip for any PAG meetings to allow for extra travel time.
At times delays can be more than 15 minutes depending on your route and potentially longer during morning and evening peak hours.

The Southern Arizona Regional Solar Partnership, a program managed by Pima Association of Governments, seeks to increase awareness of solar energy opportunities through education and outreach. A cooperative effort among government agencies, local businesses, local electric utilities, solar manufacturers, solar installers and individuals, the Solar Partnership encourages the use of solar energy by identifying the benefits of using solar and educates others about solar opportunities to support our solar economy.

2:30 p.m. on Thursday, January 21, 2016
Pima Association of Governments
Santa Rita Conference Room
1 E. Broadway Blvd., Ste. 401
Tucson, AZ 85701

Pima Association of Governments | info@pagregion.com
(520) 792-1093 | PAGregion.com

From the Pope to Paris: Climate Change Action Updates

Greetings and wishes to you all for a very Happy & Sustainable New Year!

2016 marks Sustainable Tucson’s 10th Anniversary. To mark that milestone, we will be planning this year’s meetings around the theme of “Climate Change and Actions for Our Sustainable Future.”

Join us at the next Sustainable Tucson General Meeting for a review of two major climate-change events from the past year: Pope Francis’s Encyclical and the COP21 meeting in Paris.

Hank Krzysik. local sustainable architect and policy advisor with Pima County Interfaith Council, will provide an analysis of the Pope’s Encyclical, focusing on its implications for action not just by world powers but also by each of us as individuals.

Vince Pawlowski, UA graduate student and board president of Association for the Tree of Life, recently returned from COP21, the UN Climate Conference in Paris. He will tell us what really happened behind the scenes in Paris — and particularly the US commitment will mean for Tucson (and for Arizona). “National promises will become the basis for city agendas. More than ever, cities will the first impacted, and in many cases the first actors.

Discussion following these presentations will focus on climate activism here in Tucson, in light of both the Pope’s Encyclical and the Paris agreement, and what we can (& must) do to reach our goals.

Climate change is a moral issue and a survival issue. The time for action is NOW.

The event will take place in the downstairs conference room of the Joel Valdez Main Library in downtown Tucson. Meet & greet begins at 5:30; the program will begin at 6:00. Doors open at 5:30 pm.

Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Lower Level Meeting Room,
(Free lower level parking off Alameda St.)