Localizing Our Economy

Please join Sustainable Tucson for the November General Meeting, “Localizing Our Economy.” We’re excited to present speakers on two innovative tools for financing local entrepreneurs and stimulating the local economy.

Jim and Pamela Powers Hannley, from Arizonans for a New Economy, will speak on the benefits and possibility of creating an Arizona State Bank, a system designed to support local needs and local control of financial activity.
Chris Squires, of Ten 55 Brewing, will speak on crowd-funding, equity investment, and the JOBS (Jumpstart Our Business Startups) Act, a law that adjusted various securities regulations in order to encourage broader opportunities for funding of small businesses.
Discussion and Q&A will follow the presentations.

St. Mark’s Presbyterian Church, Geneva Hall
6pm-8pm (doors open at 5:30)
3809 E. 3rd Street (free parking in church lot on 2nd St.)

Religious response to environmental issues

Saint Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church, 602 N. Wilmot Road, will discuss global climate change and the impact to the environment with five speakers, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29. An optional Mass begins at 8:30 a.m.

According to press materials, speakers include:

Katie Hirschboeck, associate professor of climatology for the University of Arizona’s tree-ring lab and a Catholic Climate Ambassador.
Clark Hansen, a regional organizer for Bread for the World.
Marco Liu, director of advocacy and outreach for the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona.
Angel Wang from the Episcopal Diocese of Arizona’s committee on creation care.
The Rev. John Leech, associate priest of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church.

To RSVP, email hsieh@dakotacom.net by Tuesday, Oct. 25.

For more information, visit smallangelstucson.org or call 886-7292.

UN Conference in Tucson on Food & Water in Arid Lands

A Food and Water Conference, and a Celebration of Place

WHAT: The 2016 ITKI ● UNESCO ● City of Gastronomy Conference in Tucson, Arizona, USA: Food and Water in Arid Lands: Dialogues across Contemporary and Traditional Knowledge

WHEN: Opens on Friday, November 4, 2016 and concludes on Saturday, November 5 at 5pm, followed by a closing celebration to which all are invited. Additional programming before and after the Conference also available for those interested.

WHERE: The Conference will be held on the University of Arizona Campus, largely in the Student Union Memorial Center.

COST: Absolutely free, but registration required. Space is limited. Please join us!

Please join us for this opportunity to learn about efforts across the globe to create sustainable and thoughtful futures informed by place, history, Traditional Knowledge, and other ways of knowing.

As the world undergoes climate change, urban and rural communities in arid lands need effective adaptive strategies for ensuring resilience in the face of increasing environmental variability, changing weather patterns, dwindling water resources, and intensifying strains on food systems and food security. Join us November 4 and 5, 2016 for discussions with expert panelists about their experiences with water management and water scarcity, their work toward just food systems and sovereignty, and their insights on the roles of local knowledge in adaptation and climate change.

In addition to the Conference, panelists, distinguished guests, and attendees are encouraged to join a number of excursions that highlight both the uniqueness of our region’s cultural and food heritage, as well as our unique scientific inquiries into Earth’s living systems. Click here for more on our Friday night dinner and reception with James Beard Award winning Chef Janos Wilder at the Carriage House, and our Sunday morning brunch and programming at the Desert Museum.
For more on Tucson as a ‘culinary capital’:

Tucson becomes an unlikely food star (New York Times, 23 August 2016)
Tucson, Arizona, cultivates its foodie reputation – with a nod from Unesco (The Guardian, 17 July 2016)

6th Annual Envision Tucson Sustainable Festival


We’re very excited about this year’s Envision Tucson Sustainable Festival, this Sunday, October 16, 11am-4pm, at the YWCA, 525 N. Bonita Ave., with an amazing variety of exhibitors and vendors, speakers, food, music, and lots of fun for all. Check out the Festival website for details.

The Festival is taking place close to Tucson’s origins, reminding us of a history reaching back over 4,000 years of continuous agriculture. Talk about sustainable roots! And Mission Gardens will be at the Festival to share some of that history with us. At the same time, we’re at the heart of Tucson’s Emerging 2030 District, looking to create a sustainable future by working with building owners to reduce energy and water use by 50% by the year 2030.

There’ll be plenty of free parking, but if you choose to come (sustainably) by bike, there’ll be a Bike Valet provided by Living Streets Alliance and sponsored by Ajo Bikes.

So join us on Sunday: Learn about recycling granite for your home, recycling for art projects, and recycling for creating new tools and vehicles. Bring your questions about sustainability issues from desert gardening to neighborhood resilience, from solar for the home to solar cooking, from slow food to native fruits, from energy efficiency to electric vehicles. Find out about improving air quality, harvesting our precious rainwater, building green homes, and much, much more.

AND — There’s still opportunity to volunteer and help on the day of the Festival, from set-up in the morning to break-down at the end of the day. Use the Volunteer page on the Festival website if you can help.