The Roof Over Our Heads

• 100,000 – the number of Tucson houses over 50 years old – Today
• 200,000 – the number of Tucson houses over 50 years old – in 10 years
• 80% – the percent of houses inside the incorporated City of Tucson that will soon reach the age (about 50) when repair costs often exceeds many owners’ ability to pay them.

Have you or anyone else replaced the furnace, the ducting, the electrical service and the water and gas pipes? And, if the house was built in the 40s or 50s, add in electrical wiring

If not, it is likely that within the next 15-20 years – you will have to replace them all. Your cost: $20,000 – $30,000. Maybe more.

Neither the City, County, State nor Federal Governments can afford to pay the Trillions of dollars needed to repair all our old houses. It’s going to be mostly us, or not at all (Nationally, there are 56 million homes that will be at least 50 years old within 10 years.) But it costs several times that much to tear down and replace them. Even adding in maximum energy efficiency upgrades, it is cheaper to repair than replace.

The July Sustainable Tucson meeting will explore the needs and opportunities to repair our old houses. How can we train thousands of people to do the work? What needs to be done? And most importantly – how do we pay for it?

On Tuesday, you will hear:
• Robert Bulechek (Energy Management Consultant) – Can we make our homes MUCH more energy efficient?
• Scott Coverdale (Community Home Repair of Arizona) – What conditions are our homes really in?
• Chuck Gallagher (SkillsUSA, former construction teacher at Santa Rita High School) How do we teach the workforce we need to make Tucson more efficient?
• Rick Gibson (Sustainability Partners) How do we pay for all this?
• Tres English (Sustainable Tucson) Overview of Tucson’s housing stock

Join us for this important discussion that will begin the conversation about the future of – Keeping the “Roof Over Our Heads”.

Ward 6, 3202 E 1st St
6:00pm (doors open at 5:30pm)

Sustainable Development Goals for Tucson

On 1 January 2016, the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development — adopted by world leaders in September 2015 at an historic UN Summit — officially came into force.

What are these goals, why do they matter, and how could they apply to Tucson?

– We’ll give an overview of each of the 17 SDGs
– We’ll relate each goal to Tucson
– You’ll explore and propose options to make the goals happen

Join us for this exciting and critical thought-provoking meeting. Get inspired to create a Sustainable Tucson for 2030!

Tuesday, June 11, 2019
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

Tucson City Council Ward 6 Office: 3202 East 1st Street · Tucson, AZ

Doors open at 5:30. The meeting starts promptly at 6.

Food Resilient Tucson – Our Future is Delicious

Why should we want a Delicious & Resilient local food system?
• We get to enjoy the wide range of delicious local foods that show off our 4000-year history of growing food in the desert.
• We get to celebrate the unique history and multiple cultures that make Tucson special.
• We get to create thousands of local jobs based on everything from growing and preparing local food to learning to design and build the specialty tools that will help make Tucson a world leader in desert-adapted urban agriculture.
• And of great importance, we get to share delicious food with our neighbors and create community in the process.

Why do we need a Resilient & Delicious local food system?
• Most national food chains have adopted a Just-In-Time inventory system, so we have only a few days of food in our stores.
• The national distribution system brings us everything, every day, from 1000 miles away and could become a bottle neck, if anything goes seriously wrong with the communication, banking, power and fuel systems that run it.
• It will help us do our part to mitigate climate change and protect us from climate impacts, like unstable food supplies.

The May General Meeting will focus on two questions:
• What do we need to do to make Tucson more Food Resilient? And why do we need to make Tucson a more food-resilient community?
• What factors that led to our designation as a World City of Gastronomy can we use to grow and eat more local food?

We have an excellent panel of local experts who will give their perspectives on these questions, discuss their implications for Tucson, and lead us in a lively discussion.

Panelist are:
• Carolyn Niethammer – Cookbook author, specializing in local food
• Mohyeddin Abdulaziz – President of Tucson Organic Gardeners
• Erik Stanford – Owner of Pivot Produce, a local logistics company that connects local farms and restaurants
• Parker Filer – Member of Pima County Food Alliance and educator
• Michael Ray – Neighborhood activist and member of Building Resilient Neighborhoods
• Moderator: Tres English – Sustainable Tucson and local sustainability expert

Join us on Tuesday, May 14 at 6:00 (doors open at 5:30) at the Ward 6 office, 3202 E 1st St.

The Green New Deal – What Is It?


U.S. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Democrat of New York, and U.S. Senator Ed Markey (R), Democrat of Massachusetts, speak during a press conference to announce Green New Deal legislation to promote clean energy programs outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC.
 Saul Loeb/AFP—Getty Images

You’ve been hearing a lot in the news about the Green New Deal. Politicians have been praising and criticizing it, pundits have been pontificating about it, and social media has been buzzing about it. But what is really in the Green New Deal? What does it promise and what isn’t covered?

In this month’s Sustainable Tucson meeting, with the help of the Sunrise Movement, we are going to dissect the Green New Deal to see exactly what it is all about. Please join us for this inspiring and informational discussion.

Tuesday, April 9, 2019 at the Tucson City Council Ward 6 Office. Doors open at 5:30 pm, program starts at 6.

Tucson’s Complete Streets Policy

On February 5th, the Tucson City Council passed Ordinance 11621 – The City of Tucson Complete Streets Policy. What’s in the Complete Streets Policy? How was it created? What does it mean? How will it affect the future of Tucson? At our next meeting, we are going to answer these questions and more. We’ll look at the details of the new policy and how it was created. We’ll also have some expert opinion about how the policy will be implemented. Be sure to join us and get a glimpse of the future of Tucson!

Tuesday, March 12, 2019 from 6-8 pm at the Ward 6 community room. Doors open at 5:30.

Advocacy 101 – Working with our government

RSVP

The 2019 Arizona State Legislature session is well underway, with legislators introducing bills that will, if passed, have significant impact on our lives and our rights. At the federal level, the new Congress is hard at work, and locally both City Council and County Board of Supervisors deal with matters of direct interest to our community. At all levels, it’s vitally important to make our voices heard on important issues that we care about and that affect us all.

Join Sustainable Tucson at our February Monthly Meeting for Advocacy 101, an evening of training and tips on effective ways to reach out to elected officials, focusing primarily on the State Legislature, with lessons learned that can apply equally well at the local or national level. Presenters from League of Women Voters Greater Tucson will give an overview of the state legislative process and provide details about the Request to Speak (RTS) process, an easy but effective way to communicate your position on proposed bills as they are reviewed in committee. Then Jana Segal, Sustainable Tucson’s Advocacy Chair, will present a description of ST advocacy and policy efforts and how you can (and should) get involved.

Along with an overview of RTS, the LWVGT presenters will teach us how to sign up for an online account to use the system. If you bring your laptop, phone, or whatever you use to connect to the Internet, you’ll be able to sign up right then and there. Alternatively, you’ll learn how to sign up online at home or where to go in Tucson to sign up.

This evening’s program is the first in a series that Sustainable Tucson will be presenting on effective communication with our elected officials — and with those who aspire to be elected. We’ll be looking ahead and getting prepared for communicating to candidates for the City Council elections this fall, and then for elections at multiple levels in 2020.

Tuesday, February 12
Doors open 5:30 pm; program starts at 6:00 pm.
Ward 6 Council Office, 3202 E. 1st Street

Dealing with Drought


Starting at 5 pm, Sustainable Tucson will host a tour of the rainwater harvesting, greywater harvesting, and water conservation features at WMG’s Living Lab. We’ll also be showing the Arizona Public Media film “Beyond the Mirage” for those who don’t want to participate in the tour. At 6 pm Sustainable Tucson regular meeting will begin. Local experts discussing the Drought Contingency Plan, what it will mean for Tucson, and what we all can do to prepare for the upcoming shortages.

Arizona could experience the impact of a Tier 1 water shortage by 2020 if the water level in Lake Mead continues to drop. What can we do to avoid this situation…or at least mitigate the impact if it does happen?

Join Sustainable Tucson for our monthly meeting to talk about water issues, water conservation, and the Drought Contingency Plan at a special location: the Watershed Management Group Living Lab and Learning Center.

Light snacks and rainwater will be available.

Limited handicapped parking is available next to the Welcome Center, just off of Dodge Blvd. DO NOT PARK IN THE IZUMI PARKING LOT WEST OF THE LLLC – YOU WILL BE TICKETED. There is ample parking on the south side of Speedway Blvd, just behind the Bashful Bandit, and a pedestrian signal to cross at Dodge.