The Yes Men Are Revolting – Sunday Jan 4 at the Loft

at The Loft Cinema, 3233 East Speedway Boulevard, Tucson AZ 85716

Start the New Year Right: Gear Up to Fight Climate Change!

The Yes Men Are Revolting

On Sunday, January 4 at 1:00 p.m., Sustainable Tucson will partner with the Loft for a special preview screening of The Yes Men Are Revolting, with the duo of pranksters tackling the urgent issue of climate change. Join us for a comic and thought-provoking film, followed by Q&A with Yes Man and co-director Andy Bichlbaum. Stop by the Sustainable Tucson table before the film and learn more about what’s happening in Tucson to fight climate change and promote a sustainable future, including details about our next General Meeting. Physicians for Social Responsibility will also partner for this event.

Click here for information about the film: http://loftcinema.com/film/the-yes-men-are-revolting/

Continue reading below for more perspectives on climate change and climate action.

Support the Broadway Coalition Petition Drive

NOTE: This petition is an initiative of the Broadway Coalition which is solely responsible for processing and managing the results. Sustainable Tucson hosts this online petition drive as a community service.

[gravityform id=8 name=Please sign petition here title=true description=true]

We want a thriving, vibrant Broadway Boulevard that is a destination for all of Tucson.

Local, regional and out-of-town residents flock to this unique cultural asset for delicious Best-of-Tucson cuisine and quirky boutiques found only there, as well as for services that locals rely on every day. Currently, this street boasts 287 businesses generating over $4 million in sales and real estate tax revenues, nearly all of them in historic or architecturally significant buildings.  And in addition to the sense of place, the mid-century modern architecture and design generates $1.5 million tourist dollars annually.  Excessive widening of the road puts all of these assets in danger. International transportation expert Jarrett Walker recently said in Tucson that widening Broadway would be “economically ruinous.”

Therefore, we call on you, our elected officials, to select an alternative for Broadway that:

– protects the economic vitality of the hundreds of existing small businesses along Broadway and provides safe, convenient access to them;

– promotes accessible, efficient use of public transit and other alternative modes of transportation, giving particular attention to pedestrian and bicycle activity and safety;

– promotes a safe and pleasant envirionment for all users–pedestrians, cyclists, transit and wheelchair users, as well as cars;

– continues to offer residents in the area a range of services and amenities while preserving and enhancing the connectedness and quality of life of surrounding neighborhoods and residents;

– is environmentally sustainable;

– incorporates innovative approaches to transportation that recognize changing public attitudes and behaviors; and

– is a fiscally sound, affordable approach that recognizes that people are driving less (travel on this stretch of Broadway is down over 15% from 2010) and doesn’t waste $74 million on excess roadway capacity.

Cities of the US and abroad are realizing the benefits of renovating their urban cores on a more human scale and are moving away from car-centric designs. Cities that are human scaled promote community. The Sunshine Mile could become this human-scaled neighborly place. The foundation is already there.

I therefore petition the Tucson Mayor and Council members to select a design alternative that locates all improvements substantially within a 96-foot crosswidth (which City staff has stated can be done), or less where possible, so that Central Broadway can regain its role as a great, attractive, historic Tucson destination with an enhanced sense of place while safely supporting all modes of mobility so that Central Broadway can regain its role as a great, attractive, historic Tucson destination with an enhanced sense of place safely supporting all modes of mobility.

ST March Meeting: Preparedness for a World of Change

 

Sustainable Tucson’s March Meeting:
Preparedness for a World of Change

Monday, March 10, 2014,    5:30 – 8:00 pm

Joel D. Valdez Main Library, Lower Level Meeting Room,
101 N. Stone, (free lower level parking off Alameda St.)

Join the Sustainable Tucson community and extended network to hear Nicole Foss, world-renown lecturer and co-creator of TheAutomaticEarth.Com speak from their DVD on Preparedness. Time will be taken to discuss this important subject which all of us are interested in.

Topics include Navigating an Epic Predicament, Psychology of Contraction, De-Globalization, Community and Society, Energy and Resources, Goods and Services, Nutrition and Health, Entertainment and Education, Be Prepared with Hard Goods, To Rent or Own, Community Building, Depression-proof Employment, and Building Robust Systems.

This General Meeting should begin the conversation of what we actually should start doing and acting on.

We hope to see you all there.

Doors open at 5:30. Program begins at 6:00 until 8;00pm

In addition to the General Meeting on Monday, March 10th, there will be an online Whole Earth Summit March 11 -13th, featuring 42 global sustainability leaders including Tucson’s own Brad Lancaster. To see the schedule of speakers and get more info on how you can connect, go to:

    www.WholeEarthSummit.org

This should be an unforgettable convergence of like hearts and minds considering: What’s your vision for a resilient world? How are you creating it now? Food + water + community + regenerative design + social transformation!

Who knew that Seoul was a leader in the sharing economy?

Who knew that Seoul was a leader in the sharing economy?
by Richard Heinberg
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Published by Post Carbon Institute on 2013-11-12
Original article: http://www.postcarbon.org/blog-post/1949822-who-knew-that-seoul-was-a
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Did you know that Seoul, South Korea is one of the world’s key sites for post-growth economic re-development? No? Neither did I, until I saw for myself.
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I was pleased to be invited to give the keynote address at a conference titled “Reshaping the Way We Live,” put on by the Seoul Youth Hub, held November 7-8. I had no idea what to expect, and was rather surprised when the event turned out to be one of the most enjoyable and eye-opening in recent memory.
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First, some background on South Korea. The nation has an export-based industrial economy that has expanded rapidly in recent decades; however, its rate of growth has begun to slow and the youth unemployment rate is now north of 22 percent. Korean politics has also taken a worrisome turn: many citizens dispute the legitimacy of the most recent presidential election, which brought to power Park Geun-hye, the daughter of former dictator Park Chung-hee.
Meanwhile Korea’s energy situation could hardly be bleaker: the nation imports essentially all its oil, natural gas, and coal (Korea was once self-sufficient in coal, but production has declined dramatically). It gets some electricity from hydropower, but there is little room for expansion. The country’s 23 nuclear power plants are subject to increasing controversy since the 2011 Fukushima catastrophe in nearby Japan, as many Koreans fear they are now eating radioactive fish.
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The Seoul Youth Hub evidently sees crisis as opportunity. Why else would they ask the author of The End of Growth to address a conference of 18-to-40 year-olds? I came to their attention through a protracted Internet search, but it helped that three of my books have been translated into Korean. Evidently the organizers weren’t shy about conveying a sobering message.
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Lunch with the Youth Hub conference organizers.
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Though I hadn’t visited their country previously, I knew that Koreans have a reputation for being friendly and generous. If my experience is any gauge, the reputation is well deserved. The organizers put me up at a traditional Hanok Korean guesthouse (no chairs or television, just mats on the floor of a beautifully constructed, floor-heated, meticulously scrubbed little pavilion). Nearly all food provided during my stay was also traditional, and included a Buddhist temple meal with multiple courses of artistically crafted vegetarian morsels. Suffice it to say that I felt well taken care of and had a splendid time.
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Now to the conference itself. Except for the opening keynote and a final wrap-up, the sessions were workshops led by eight collaborative groups (including ones from Hong Kong and Japan), each of which is a youth-led organization engaged in social innovation. You can find a list of participating groups at the conference website. The subjects explored ranged from cheese-making to innovations in democratic decision-making; in effect, it amounted to a multi-track laboratory for young people to explore adaptive responses to economic contraction.
Surprisingly, the event was free to the participants. The City of Seoul footed the bill, thanks to Mayor Park Won-soon (more about him in a moment).
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The Seoul Youth Hub is a project of the Seoul Metropolitan Government, and its mandate is to help young people “design a future society” by providing a place where they can share and resolve their problems, experiment with a sharing economy, and “discuss specific policies regarding various agendas such as work-labor, housing, life safety net, business creation, youth politics,” and more. The Hub is also intended as a model and a networking center for similar projects throughout Asia. I highly recommend watching this short video.
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The venue for the conference was the Youth Hub’s headquarters, which features movable walls, furniture made of recycled building materials, open and shared office spaces, informal dormitory nooks, a café, and learning co-laboratories. Altogether, there was far more going on here than I could take in during the two days of the conference, much less describe in a couple of paragraphs.
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On the evening of the first day of the conference I met Mayor Park at his offices in City Hall, a twisty new steel-and-glass structure whose ground floor is devoted to citizen-led social innovation projects.
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Copies of The End of Growth were on the Mayor’s meeting room table. Using an interpreter, we got right to it: he had clearly read the book and asked intelligent questions about it. What would I recommend that he and the City of Seoul do to prepare for the end of economic growth? It was a stunning question, given the circumstances, and he appeared eager to consider whatever suggestions I might offer. I started rattling off a laundry list of ideas—supporting farmers’ markets, community gardens, and other staples of a local food system; discouraging cars while encouraging bicycling and public transport; raising energy building standards to the Passive House level; staging more cultural events to increase the happiness quotient among citizens. When I finished, he recited examples of how he and the City have already begun doing nearly every one of these things. He was saying, in effect, “Check, check, check. Come on, what else have you got? Please tell me, and I’ll see if we can do it!” I suggested he find a way for the City to help bring Transition to Seoul (there are currently two official Transition Initiatives in Japan, none in Korea). He promised to do just that.
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Mayor Park Won-soon
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Whoa, I thought. Who is this guy? I looked up his Wikipedia listing later that night. Before becoming Mayor in 2011, Park Won-soon had a 30-year career as a human rights and social justice activist and spent four months in prison for some of these activities. In recent years he developed a chain of nonprofit “Beautiful Stores,” which collect donations of used items, repair them if needed, and sell them to raise money for the social enterprise movement. There are now over a hundred of these stores throughout Korea.
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Inside a Beautiful Store
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Hard to believe this man is the elected leader of the largest city proper in the world, with a population of over 10 million.
The organizers of the Youth Hub conference think the world of Mayor Park, and I can understand why. I’ve seen a lot of hopeful post-growth initiatives in a lot of places—usually citizen-led and modest in scale; never have I seen such visionary, intelligent leadership at the municipal government level within so large a city.
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This is a country with a hard future ahead. Challenges with energy, the economy, and the environment are lining up (not to mention ever-present tensions with North Korea). Yet if efforts led by Mayor Park and the Seoul Youth Hub manage to flourish, things may go much better than they otherwise would. Perhaps other cities can begin to find inspiration here.
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For a helpful overview of the food sovereignty movement in South Korea, see this article from Foreign Policy in Focus.
Richard Heinberg in front of a Youth Hub garden of Korean cabbage (key ingredient of Kim-Chee)

Content on the Post Carbon Institute site is subject to this fair use notice.

Resilience is a program of Post Carbon Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping the world transition away from fossil fuels and build sustainable, resilient communities.


Source URL: http://www.resilience.org/stories/2013-11-12/who-knew-that-seoul-was-a-leader-in-the-sharing-economy

Desert Climate Composting Workshop – Aug 16/17

Community garden at 901 East 12th Street, Tucson AZ

Saturday – rain date or overflow second workshop

 

Composting workshop specifically designed for dry deserts

Specifically designed for dry deserts, this workshop focuses on
• Low water use, conserving water for hot composting rather than dry slow
• Cold method
• Easy on your back
• Low maintenance saves you water and time.
• Bin rehab and modification for desert conditions.

Plus
• Garden tips for kinked hoses, plant and tool hangers.
• Raised movable beds designed for gardeners who need work from a siting position.
• Lots of ideas using materials you probably have sitting around.

$5.-$10 sliding scale.
Workshop limited to 25 participants.
E-mail Mudnjoy(at)aol.com to register.

Composting Coach to Your Rescue

DESPITE YOUR BEST INTENTIONS is your garden compost a big solid dry hard lump, a soggy dense smelly mess, or just stalled? Are your dreams of producing your own rich earth not realized? You deserve rich fertile earth. I’ve rehabbed several old unusable compost piles into rich fertile earth!

INVEST IN YOUR OWN ON-SITE COMPOST instead of commercial fertilizers, soil conditioners, sterile (worthless) potting soil. Have better soil, be more GREEN! We can cheaply modify that old bin that dries out too often into a
workable unit that doesn’t require frequent watering. SAVE WATER and time. You can use a large open compost bins as a winter compost-heated green house. I can help you design your garden to harvest rainwater or use gray water.

Joy Holdread is the self proclaimed composting queen of the universe. No degree in earth science, just a green thumb, personal success, references, a commitment to garden using practical simple, resourceful, creative and sustainable options. I’ll work hard right beside you and we’ll have fun making your garden grow. Flexible schedule. Glowing testimonials. Email Mudnjoy(at)aol.com

Bisbee Solar Cook-Off and Festival – June 1

Free, at the Bisbee Farmers Market in Vista Park, Warren District, Bisbee Arizona

 

Bisbee Solar Cook-Off and Festival

Join Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture and the Bisbee Farmers Market for the 11th Annual Solar Cook-Off & Festival on Saturday, June 1 from 9am to 1pm.

Activities will include solar cooking demonstrations as well as solar ovens and accessories for sale.  At 10:30am, join local experts for a Solar Cooking Basics class.  At 11:30, learn how to build your own solar oven with a cardboard box and aluminum foil.  Feel free to bring a solar oven and join in the fun (a potluck will follow the event for those who prepare solar food).

Location: Bisbee Farmers Market (in Vista Park, Warren District).
For more info, visit www.bajaaz.org/calendar.  Free.

Questions?  Contact Meghan at meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org or 520-331-9821.

Bisbee Organic Garden Tour – May 26

Free, starting at Ecoasis, 54 Brewery Avenue, Bisbee Arizona

 
Join Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture (BASA) and Ecoasis on the first annual Bisbee Organic Garden Tour on Sunday, May 26 from 10am to 2pm.

This year’s tour will showcase four successful vegetable gardens along Brewery Gulch in the heart of Old Bisbee.  Come out to view artistic, inventive ways to grow produce in unconventional spaces.  Also learn how to start (or improve) your own garden, get growing tips, observe spring crops, and learn about mulching, composting, and watering systems.  Or just meet some fellow gardeners.

The tour is self-guided; stop by Ecoasis (54 Brewery Avenue) before you begin to pick up a tour map and get information on backyard growing, sustainable agriculture, and gardening for market.

This is a free event.  Contact BASA for details at www.bajaaz.org, 520-331-9821 or meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org

Building Sustainable Cities – New York Times Conference April 25

See the online video archive of the entire conference at nytenergyfortomorrow.com

ENERGY FOR TOMORROW – BUILDING SUSTAINABLE CITIES

A NEW YORK TIMES CONFERENCE
IN COLLABORATION WITH RICHARD ATTIAS AND ASSOCIATES

APRIL 25, 2013
THE TIMESCENTER, NEW YORK CITY

 
THE CONCEPT

According to U.N. data, the worldwide urban population over the next 40 years will increase by 3.1 billion people. Where will the water come from for these people to drink and use? The fuel to heat and cool their homes? The fresh fruit and vegetables for them to eat? The modes of transportation to move them from home to workplace and back? And how can we build buildings, develop infrastructure and diversify transport in ways that limit the waste and pollutants that could make these urban areas unpleasant and unhealthy places to live? These are the issues The New York Times will tackle in its second annual Energy for Tomorrow Conference: Building Sustainable Cities.

In America and in other countries around the world, there is an enormous amount of innovation going on to make our cities more eco-friendly and sustainable. There are fleets of natural gas-fueled trucks and hybrid taxis. LEED-certified buildings are being constructed. Cutting-edge technology is helping cities cut down on energy and resource use. Summers bring urban and rooftop farming. And this innovation is occurring at both a micro and macro level.

THE FORMAT AND AUDIENCE

The New York Times will bring together some 400 thought leaders, public policy makers, government urbanists and C-suite level executives from energy, technology, automotive and construction industries among others, to debate and discuss the wide range of issues that must be addressed if we can create an urban environment that can meet the needs of its citizens and, thanks to innovation, run cleanly and efficiently. The conference will be invitation-only.

There will be a fee of $795 to attend the one-day conference, but The Times will make some grants available for N.G.O.s, entrepreneurs and start-ups to attend at a discount. The format will mix head-to-head debates, panel discussions, keynote addresses, case studies and audience brainstorming sessions.

 
APRIL 24 EVENING
(THE EVE OF THE CONFERENCE)

7 – 9p.m.
SCREENING OF THE DOCUMENTARY “TRASHED”

The documentary feature film “Trashed” highlights solutions to the pressing environmental problems facing us all. Academy Award-winning actor Jeremy Irons has teamed up with British filmmaker Candida Brady to record the devastating effect that pollution has had on some of the world’s most beautiful destinations. The screening will be followed by a conversation with Irons.

Confirmed speakers:
Jeremy Irons, actor and executive producer, “Trashed”
in conversation with David Carr, media and culture columnist, The New York Times

 
APRIL 25 AGENDA

Throughout the day, we will be conducting networking and discussion sessions (via smartphones and BlackBerries) to gather, as well as to submit questions to the panel

7 a.m.
REGISTRATION AND BREAKFAST

7:45 – 8:45 a.m.
BREAKFAST DISCUSSION
SMART VEHICLES ARE HERE: CAN GOVERNMENT KEEP PACE?

The pressures are building for safer and smarter vehicles on our roads, raising questions about the national, state and local policies that will emerge. Several states are already early adopters of legislation to enable the use of autonomous vehicles. But every law is different, no national policies exist and innovations are unfolding rapidly. With the evolution of connected vehicles, intelligent roadways, and cloud-based technologies (first maps, soon much more), there will be a host of choices for consumers and governments.

Moderated by Gordon Feller, director of urban innovations, Cisco Systems; founder, Meeting of the Minds

Confirmed Panelists:
Anthony Levandowski, manager, Google autonomous vehicle project
Alex Padilla, state senator, California
Jim Pisz, corporate manager, North American business strategy, Toyota Motor Sales Inc.
Dan Smith, senior associate administrator for vehicle safety, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
Bryant Walker Smith, fellow, Center for Automotive Research, Stanford University

9 – 9:30 a.m.
OPENING ADDRESS

Michael Bloomberg, mayor of the City of New York and chair of the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group

Introduced by Arthur Sulzberger Jr., publisher, The New York Times

9:30 – 10:15 a.m.
THE MAYORS’ PANEL
HOW DO WE REINVENT OUR CITIES FOR THE THIRD INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION?

The city of 2025 could be crisis-ridden if the world doesn’t create more sustainable models of urban development. Research says that our cities will continue to expand and increase in population, while their populations will bring rising consumption and emissions. Alongside these huge challenges, there are also opportunities for businesses: electric vehicles, new low-carbon means of cooling, and energy efficient buildings. We ask a group of mayors to outline an urban planning strategy for 2025.

Moderated by Bill Keller, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
Jaime Lerner, former mayor of Curitiba, Brazil
Stephanie Miner, mayor of Syracuse
Enrique Peñalosa, former mayor of Bogotá, Colombia
Greg Stanton, mayor of Phoenix

10:15 – 10:40 a.m.
COFFEE BREAK

10:40 – 11 a.m.
COLUMNIST CONVERSATION

Jeremy Irons, actor and executive producer, “Trashed”
in conversation with Andrew Revkin, Op-Ed columnist and author, Dot Earth blog, The New York Times

*Please note, there is a screening of “Trashed” on the eve of the conference. Seats are limited and the
screening will be open to the public. Confirmed conference participants will get priority.

11 – 11:30 a.m.
PLENARY: THINK NATIONAL, BUT POWER LOCAL

A sustainable city will use a high proportion of renewable energy, but there is a catch-22: sites that generate renewable electricity – wind farms, solar farms and tidal generators – tend to be far away from urban centers. How can we create grids that get renewable energy from the places it is made to the hundreds of millions who will use it? Meanwhile, how can we increase and incentivize localized power generation and supply? Options include district heating and cooling, and buildings producing their own power through solar powered roofs or single wind turbines, and then sharing that power through a smart grid.

Moderated by Thomas L. Friedman, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
Sabine Froning, C.E.O., Euroheat and Power
Patricia Hoffman, assistant secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S.
Kevin Burke, chairman, president and C.E.O., Consolidated Edison Inc.

11:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
COLUMNIST CONVERSATION

Shaun Donovan, United States secretary of housing and urban development
in conversation with Thomas L. Friedman, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

12 – 12:40 p.m.
GAMECHANGERS: THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION

Cutting-edge technology is helping cities cut down on energy and resource use and this innovation is occurring at both a micro and macro level. Can we innovate quickly enough?

Moderated by Joe Nocera, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
Stephen Kennedy Smith, president, Em-Link LLC
Judi Greenwald, vice president for technology and innovation, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions
Adam Grosser, group head and partner, Silver Lake Kraftwerk
Neil Suslak, founder and managing partner, Braemar Energy
Steven E. Koonin, director of the Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP)

12:40 – 2:05 p.m.
LUNCH AND BRAINSTORMING, URBAN FOOD SUPPLY

Lunch will take place in the Hall downstairs; during lunch we will host a brainstorming discussion featuring expert panelists on the Urban Food Supply.

Moderated by Mark Bittman, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

Discussion leaders:
Will Allen, founder and C.E.O., Growing Power
Dave Wann, president, Sustainable Futures Society
Dan Barber, chef and co-owner, Blue Hill at Stone Barns and director of program, President’s Council on
Fitness, Sports and Nutrition

2:05 – 2:40 p.m.
DISCUSSION: GREEN BUILDINGS AND URBAN DESIGN

Sustainable cities need energy-efficient buildings and the current symbol of urban architecture – the glass and metal skyscraper – scores badly in this regard. What kinds of building should be the centerpieces of new sustainable cities? Are current green building codes leading us in the right direction? Nearly half of the world’s new megacities will be in China and India: how can their leaders ensure that the millions of new structures in these cities use energy sparingly and follow sustainable urban planning?

Moderated by Michael Kimmelman, architecture critic, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
David Fisk, co-director of the BP Urban Energy Systems Project and Laing O’Rourke Professor in Systems Engineering and Innovation, Imperial College London
Hal Harvey, C.E.O., Energy Innovation: Policy and Technology LLC
Katrin Klingenberg, Passivehouse Institute, USA
Jonathan Rose, founder and president, Jonathan Rose Companies
Martha Schwartz, professor in practice of landscape architecture, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, and co-founder, Working Group for Sustainable Cities, Harvard University

2:40 – 3:15 p.m.
DISCUSSION: TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC

An effective and energy-efficient transport network is the skeleton of a sustainable city, allowing residents to move from home to work with a minimum of congestion, pollution or emissions. The solutions are different for old cities and new cities, and for rich cities and poor cities. But the traditional model of urban expansion followed by new roads has created a vicious spiral where new roads beget more cars, which beget the need for more roads. New, more sustainable ideas for city transportation not only reduce emissions, but also improve quality of life.

Moderated by Joe Nocera, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
Walter Hook, C.E.O., Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
Peder Jensen, head of programme, governance and networks, European Environment Agency
Anna Nagurney, director, Virtual Center for Supernetworks, Isenberg School of Management, University of Massachusetts
Naveen Lamba, intelligent transportation lead, IBM
Janette Sadik-Khan, NYC transportation commissioner

3:15 – 3:30 p.m.
COLUMNIST CONVERSATION
PLANET-WARMING EMISSIONS: IS DISASTER INEVITABLE?

Klaus Jacob, adjunct professor, School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University
in conversation with Joe Nocera, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

3:30 – 4:15 p.m.
NETWORKING DISCUSSION:
Participants will be split into two concurrent sessions to brainstorm two issues on the sustainable agenda. Led by a member of The Times team, and with an expert panel to comment and shape the discussions, participants will brainstorm ideas together. The results of the brainstorming – including suggested actions – will be released after the event.

DISCUSSION 1: TRANSPORT

Ingvar Sejr Hansen, head of city planning, City of Copenhagen
Ari Kahn, policy adviser for electric vehicles, New York City Mayor’s Office of Long-term Planning and Sustainability
Bruce Schaller, deputy commissioner for traffic and planning, New York City Department of Transportation
Greg Stanton, mayor of Phoenix

DISCUSSION 2: GREEN SPACES

Kai-Uwe Bergmann, partner, Bjarke Ingels Group
Steven Caputo Jr., deputy director, New York City Mayor’s Office of Long-term Planning and Sustainability
Susan Donoghue, senior adviser and assistant commissioner for strategic initiatives, New York City Parks
Deborah Marton, senior vice president of programs, New York Restoration Project

4:15 – 4:35 p.m.
COFFEE BREAK

4:35 – 4:55 p.m.
COLUMNIST CONVERSATION

Carol Browner, senior counselor, Albright Stonebridge Group, and former energy czar
in conversation with Bill Keller, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

4:55 – 5:45 p.m.
CLOSING PLENARY
DEALBOOK: INVESTING IN THE CITY OF TOMORROW

The challenge is to reinvent and retool the cities and urban life in a guise that is more sustainable – and to do it fast. Some of the best minds in the developed and developing worlds are trying to address this global issue. Architects, urban planners and engineers are drawing up plans. Business consultants are looking for new business opportunities as these sustainable cities evolve. The World Bank is trying to figure out how to finance their growth. How can we finance the creation of the city of tomorrow?

Moderated by Andrew Ross Sorkin, columnist/editor, DealBook, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
Alicia Glen, managing director, Urban Investment Group, Goldman Sachs
Richard Kauffman, chairman of energy and finance, Office of the Governor, State of New York
William McDonough, chairman, McDonough Advisors

5:45 p.m. CLOSING AND RECEPTION

 
See the online video archive of the entire conference at nytenergyfortomorrow.com

Awakening the Dreamer workshops – Circle Tree Ranch – June 10, Sep 9, Dec 9

 
Free (RSVP) at Circle Tree Ranch, 10500 E Tanque Verde Road, Tucson AZ 85749

 

 

Awakening the Dreamer – Changing the Dream

“Cultural Wisdom: The Indigenous Worldview as a Model for Social and Environmental Justice”

The Awakening the Dreamer – Changing the Dream Symposium is a profound inquiry into a bold vision: to bring forth an environmentally sustainable spiritually fulfilling and socially just human presence on Earth.

The symposium involves dynamic group interactions, cutting-edge information, and inspiring multimedia. Participants of this half-day event are inspired to reconnect with their deep concern for our world, and to recognize our responsibilities to each other, future generations, our fellow creatures, and the planet we jointly inhabit.

Designed with the collaboration of some of the finest scientific, indigenous and socially conscious minds in the world, the symposium explores the current state of our planet and connects participants to a powerful global movement to reclaim our future.

This dynamic and innovative presentation will explore the ancient wisdom of cultures around the globe and their spiritual, social, and environmental worldview. Recognizing the critical role of community, participants engage with one another in analyzing methods that create earth-honoring systems and ways of being. Experiencing the world as profoundly interconnected, participants will understand how in their living practices they can bring forth an environmentally sustainable, socially just, and spiritual fulfilling human presence on our planet. The goal of the presentation is to provide an experience that inspires each person to stand for an entirely new possibility for our future by embracing the indigenous worldview as a model for social and environmental justice.

Amity Foundation – Circle Tree Ranch
Bear Hall
10500 E Tanque Verde Road
Tucson, AZ 85749

RSVP to Pamela Jay at 520-749-5980 ext.252 or email pjay(at)amityfdn.org

3 Continuing Education Hours, NAADAC Provider #538

Donations welcomed for Dragonfly Village – dedicated to the inclusion and habilitation of children and families marginalized by homelessness, poverty, addiction, crime, racism, sexism, trauma, and violence.

www.circletreeranch.org

Pima County Food Alliance – April Meeting – April 29

at the Sam Lena Library, 1607 S 6th Ave, Tucson AZ

 
Join the Pima County Food Alliance for our monthly meeting on Monday, April 29 from 6:00 to 8:00pm at the Sam Lena Library (1607 S 6th Ave, Tucson).

April is Native Foods Month at the Pima County Food Alliance!

This month we’ll be hearing from two experts on native foods. The first is Chef Barry Infuso, who works with Pima Community College and is known for his work with the Pascua Yaqui Tribe. In particular, Infuso’s work has explored the use of native, culturally appropriate foods as an avenue to (re-)establishing health with a population that has suffered tremendously from the pervasiveness of the Western diet.

Amy Schwemm, known around town for her delicious mesquite cookies and prickly pear lemonade, comes to us from a local organization called Desert Harvesters. If you’re not familiar with the organization, well…you should be. Come learn about all the great native food- and plant-related work they’re doing, and find ways to plug in.

The Pima County Food Alliance works to engage community partners to understand and develop our food system through the following strategies:

Education: Creating opportunities for coalition members, their families, friends, neighbors, schools, and elected officials to learn about the importance of sustainably growing and eating healthful food as well as relevant food policy issues.

Networking: Having a space to meet and learn from other food councils and individuals in the community who are involved in community-based food projects and programs.

Outreach: Meeting with and inviting other individuals, organizations, agencies and policy makers to collaborate around the goals of the group.

Policy change: Determining what governmental, institutional, and corporate policies are barriers to or opportunities to improve the conditions involved in growing and eating sustainable, local, and healthful food. Work to promote healthy and sustainable policies based on community-wide collaboration.

Contact Meghan at 520-331-9821 with any questions!

A Fierce Green Fire – A Film and Panel on Green Activism – April 19

at The Loft Cinema, 3233 East Speedway Blvd, Tucson AZ

Join us for a special post-film panel discussion on opening night, featuring local experts in the field of environmental studies!

Maria Baier – Executive Director of the Sonoran Institute

Roger Clark – Grand Canyon Program Director for The Grand Canyon Trust

Paul Green – Executive Director of the Tucson Audubon Society

Diana Liverman – IE coDirector and Regents Professor of Geography and Development

Kenny Walker – Rachel Carson Fellow and PhD candidate in the University of Arizona’s English Department’s Rhetoric, Composition, and the Teaching of English (RCTE) program, studying the rhetoric of science and technology.

Fierce Green Fire movie poster

 
Time: Friday, April 19th at 7:00pm
Location: The Loft Cinema, 3233 East Speedway Blvd. Tucson [MAP]

Spanning 50 years of grassroots and global activism, A Fierce Green Fire, from Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Mark Kitchell (Berkeley in the Sixties), brings to light the vital stories of the environmental movement where people fought – and succeeded – against enormous odds. From halting dams in the Grand Canyon to fighting toxic waste at Love Canal; from Greenpeace to Chico Mendes; from climate change to the promise of transforming our civilization, A Fierce Green Fire is “nothing less than the history of environmentalism itself.” (Los Angeles Times).

Inspired by the book of the same name by Philip Shabecoff and informed by advisors like Edward O. Wilson, this fascinating documentary chronicles the largest movement of the 20th century and one of the major keys to the 21st. Through awe-inspiring stories of triumph and struggle, the film focuses on real world activism, people fighting to save their homes, their lives, their futures – and succeeding against all odds.

Narrated by Robert Redford, Meryl Streep, Ashley Judd, Van Jones and Isabel Allende. Directed by Mark Kitchell, 2012, 101 mins., Not Rated, First Run Features, Digital.  Watch the Trailer

“Winningly spans the broad scope of environmental history.” Justin Lowe, Hollywood Reporter

“Rousing … the most ambitious environmental documentary since An Inconvenient Truth tries to make the case that we just might win. Noggin-shaking historical truths … jabs you in the heart.” Michael Roberts, Outside Magazine

“Rarely do environmental-themed films come with the ambitious scope of A Fierce Green Fire… which aims at nothing less than the history of environmentalism itself.” Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times

Sustainable Tucson Community Fundraising Appeal

Sustainable Tucson needs your support to continue to present timely, interesting and informative monthly programs. With minimal financial support from the larger community we have provided continuous monthly programs for nearly seven years, drawing particularly on local talent and sustainability leaders. As we increasingly bring in cutting-edge speakers from other cities and regions, Sustainable Tucson faces greater costs and increased organizational needs.

A brief review of previous programs archived on our website shows the breadth and depth of subject matter we have produced for the emerging sustainability community free of charge. More than 2,000 people have directly benefited from our educational, networking, and advocacy opportunities. Efforts to provide media coverage of our events will reach many thousands more.

There are two ways you can help us further our mission to foster greater understanding  and collaborative activities ensuring resilience and a sustainable future.  One way is to use your credit card and go to our online donation webpage: (http://www.sustainabletucson.org/contactcontribute/donate). The other is simply to write a check to “NEST Inc — Sustainable Tucson”  and mail it to P.O. Box 41144, Tucson, AZ 85717

Thank you for your support and remember that every dollar donated to Sustainable Tucson goes a long way to help all of us find our way to more sustainable lives and a more sustainable community.

Tucson Time Traders – Tucson’s Local Timebank

Please see timetraders.metasofa.org for more information on our Timebank orientation meetings and other events.

We’re also at Sustainable Tucson Monthly Meetings to give information about timebanking and Tucson Time Traders, and help you sign up online.

 

TUCSON TIME TRADERS

Helping Build Community 1 Hour at a Time

Tucson Time Traders is our local Timebank for the Tucson region.  Check the website for our latest news and events, or open a new account, or login if you’re a member – http://timetraders.metasofa.org

 

What Is A Time Bank?

A Timebank is a group of people who trade an hour of work for an hour of work – everyone’s time is valued equally.  The hours are recorded in the timebank software so we can trade them around the timebank community.  Timebanking is a great way for people to exchange assistance and help build healthy communities.

Core Values

We are all assets – Every human being has something to contribute.

Redefining work – Some work is beyond price.  We need to value whatever it takes to raise healthy children, build strong families, revitalize neighborhoods, make democracy work, advance social justice, make the planet sustainable.

Reciprocity – Helping works better as a two-way street.  “How can I help you?” becomes “How can we help each other build the world we both will live in?”

Community – We need each other.  Networks are stronger than individuals… People helping each other reweave communities of support, strength and trust.

Respect – Every human being matters.  Respect underlies freedom of speech and freedom of religion, and supplies the heart and soul of democracy.

Intrigued?

Open a Tucson Time Traders account online, and come to an orientation meetingMembership is free and open to everyone.

For some background information, take a quick look at these excellent short videos and a sample of resources within our local timebank.

timetraders.metasofa.org

 
Also see Sustainable Tucson joins Tucson Timebank
and ST February Meeting – Tucson’s Economy

ST May Meeting – Food Resilience in the Time of Global Climate Change – May 13

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N Stone, Downtown Tucson (in the large lower-level meeting room, free lower-level parking off Alameda St)

Food Resilience in the Time of Global Climate Change

Almost all the food we eat in Tucson is not grown here. It isn’t even grown in Arizona.

Please join us for the May Sustainable Tucson meeting, and discuss with a panel of local food experts what Tucson can do to become more food resilient, and connect with local food organizations and vendors. Find out what you can do here in Tucson at the Resource and Networking session.

Nobody knows for sure how much of Tucson’s food is grown in Arizona, but the best informed guesses are that it is only a small percentage (perhaps as little as 2%-3%). The rest comes from hundreds or even thousands of miles away. Are we food secure? Can we be? Should we even try? Can we become more food resilient? Tucson can grow a lot more of our food locally than we do today, and do it sustainably and healthily. Is that important? What will it take? What are our options?

Our panel of speakers will be

Bill McDorman, Native Seeds/SEARCH
Elizabeth Mikesell, Pima County Food Alliance
Stéphane Herbert-Fort, Local Roots Aquaponics
Rafael de Grenade, Desert Oasis Initiative
Adam Valdivia, Sleeping Frog Farms
Dan Dorsey, Sonoran Permaculture Guild

And take the opportunity to meet with these organizations that are making Tucson more food resilient,

Community Gardens of Tucsonwww.communitygardensoftucson.org
Local Roots Aquaponicswww.localrootsaquaponics.com
Tucson Aquaponics Projectwww.tucsonap.org
Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculturewww.bajaza.org
Native Seeds/SEARCHwww.nativeseeds.org
Flor de Mayo Artswww.flordemayoarts.com
Iskashitaa Refugee Networkwww.iskashitaa.org
Tucson Organic Gardenerswww.tucsonorganicgardeners.org
Walking J Farmwww.walkingjfarm.com
Pima County Public Library Seed Library – www.library.pima.gov/seed-library

Explore with us what Tucson could become: 
“Resilient Tucson 2020 – Visions of a local, healthy, sustainable food supply for Tucson”. Find out what’s happening now, what’s possible, and what you can do.

We meet at the Joel Valdez downtown library, lower level meeting room (free parking under the Library, enter from Alameda Street).

Doors open at 5:30 pm
The meeting will begin at 6:00 pm
Free and open to the public

Also see Local Food Summit May 14 at U of A with Gary Nabhan & Jeff Silvertooth

Sonoran Permaculture Guild – Spring Semester Workshops

For full information, go to

www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops

 
The Sonoran Permaculture Guild finishes out its Spring Semester of workshops…

The Art of Fermentation – Sunday, April 7th

Wild Foods Walkabout – Saturday, April 13th

Bee Keeping – Saturday and Sunday, April 20th and 21st

How to Raise Chickens the Natural Way – Saturday, May 18th

Ask for Transportation Alternatives! – ADOT hearing in Tucson – Apr 12

at Pascua Yaqui Justice Center – Albert V Garcia Auditorium, 7777 S Camino Huivism, Building C, Tucson AZ

ADOT hearing in Tucson – Fri, Apr 12th, 9 AM
Ask for Transportation Alternatives!

Come to a public hearing and speak in support of transportation options.

There will be a hearing in Tucson this Friday, April 12th at 9:00 am on ADOT’s 5-year plan. We’re asking ADOT to include transit, passenger rail, biking, and pedestrian projects in their 5-year plan.

Some quick background:

Every spring, ADOT comes out with an updated 5-year construction plan and gets public comment on the plan. The 5-year plan has huge implications for our transportation system because the projects in it are the ones that get funded and built. And as usual, this year the only projects in the plan are highways and airports, which means that there won’t be any rail, transit, pedestrian, or bicycling projects that get funded and built through the 5-year plan.

This is in disconnect with the trend of Arizonans driving less, young people choosing not to drive (which was covered in a great article in the Arizona Republic last year), and as our aging population will need options other than automobiles. It doesn’t make sense to invest Arizona’s scarce transportation dollars in yesterday’s transportation system. ADOT would say that their hands are tied in a lot of ways, so they can’t fund transportation alternatives. That’s true to extent – for example, they can’t use gas tax money to fund transit like other states can – but there is more that they could be doing, such as flexing their federal Surface Transportation Program dollars to fund transit or by making sure that bike paths and sidewalks are included and funded when they build or expand a road.

We’re asking ADOT to do what they can to make sure their 5-year plan reflects that Arizonans want and need more transportation options. To do this, we’ll need to show them that there’s broad support for walking, bicycling, transit, and passenger rail.

This Friday’s hearing (Friday, April 12th; 9:00 am) will be held in the Pascua Yaqui Justice Center in the Albert V. Garcia Auditorium at 7777 S. Camino Huivism, Building C in Tucson.

If you can attend, please contact Serena Unrein of Arizona PIRG – email sunrein(at)arizonapirg.org or phone 602-252-1184 – and she can provide you with sample talking points and more information.

Community Vision for the Ronstadt Transit Center – Tucson Bus Riders Union – April 2

at the Rialto Theatre, 318 East Congress Street, Tucson AZ

 

Community Vision for the Ronstadt Transit Center

Music, food, information, and the opportunity to give YOUR input.

As downtown development proceeds, what will become of the Ronstadt Center? The City of Tucson has begun a public process aimed at “seeking a qualified development team to plan, design, construct and own/lease/manage some components of an integrated mixed use development/transit center.”

Tucson Bus Riders Union is taking the lead by hosting a community discussion about the future of Ronstadt. Help make sure the Ronstadt Center truly serves Tucson’s bus riders and that our downtown is for everyone!

Join the conversation.
Bring your ideas… Your story… Your voice

Hosted by Tucson Bus Riders Union and Primavera Foundation.
For information or to help with this event, contact Suzanne, 289-4088, chelcdavid(at)gmail.com


Ronstadt Center user survey, Wednesday, April 10

Tucson Bus Riders Union is seeking volunteers to help survey bus riders at the Ronstadt Center, in cooperation with Sun Tran and the Downtown Tucson Partnership.

If you’d like to participate for a 3-hour shift between 4:30 a.m. and 8:00 p.m., contact Suzanne, 289-4088, chelcdavid(at)gmail.com, for info about the brief training session to be held in the preceding days.

A great opportunity to learn about transit users and the current downtown scene!

Money and Life / Rethinking Money – Tucson film premier – Fox Theater March 26

at the Fox Theater, 17 West Congress Street, downtown Tucson AZ

 

Tucson film premier of Money & Life with filmmaker Katie Teague
and a presentation by Bernard Lietaer and Jacqui Dunne

Please join us for a very special event on March 26, 2013 at the Fox Theatre. The Tuscon Premiere of the documentary film Money & Life in conjunction with a presentation by Bernard Lietaer and Jacqui Dunne, co-authors of Rethinking Money: How New Currencies Turn Scarcity into Prosperity.

Communities, businesses and governments around the globe are rethinking money. Transformation is taking place, not through conventional taxation, enlightened self-interest or government programs, but by people simply reconsidering the concept of money.

In Rethinking Money, Lietaer and Dunne explore the origins of our current monetary system – built on bank debt and scarcity – revealing the surprising and sometimes shocking ways its unconscious limitations give rise to so many serious problems. They will offer real world examples of ordinary people and their communities using new money, working in cooperation with national currencies, to strengthen local economies, create work, and beautify cities.

Time: March 26, 2013, 7:00 pm (doors open at 6:00)
Location: The Fox Theatre, 17 West Congress Street, Tucson AZ 85701
Cost: $30 per person; $45 per couple (includes one copy of the book Rethinking Money)

Watch a trailer for the film at www.moneyandlifemovie.com, including an appearance by Tucsonan Tom Greco, and see a three-minute clip of Bernard from his interview for Money & Life at vimeo.com/41960492, along with other clips and interviews from the film.

Also see Rethinking Money in Tucson – meetings with Bernard Lietaer & Jacqui Dunne – March 25 & 26 – two free presentations / discussions in Tucson with the authors of Rethinking Money.

Hungry for Change: Food, Ethics, & Sustainability – starting March 27

for 6 Wednesdays, near Congress & Grande, Tucson AZ

Hungry for Change: Food, Ethics, & Sustainability Discussion Course

Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture offers “Hungry for Change”, a 6-session discussion course that analyzes the connection between food, ethics, and sustainability. The goals of the course are to explore the interconnected nature of food systems & our relationship to them; examine the impact our food choices have on our health, the health of others, & the planet; and consider the ethical & political implications of our current food system & our personal food choices.

Participants meet for discussion on six Wednesdays, March 27 to May 1, from 6:30 to 8:00pm (attendance required at all sessions).

Location: downtown/west Tucson, near Congress & Grande.
Cost: $30 BASA members, $35 non-members; or $50 for the course and a 1-year BASA membership.

See www.bajaaz.org/calendar for more info.
Contact Meghan at meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org or 520-331-9821 to register.

31st Annual Solar Potluck – Catalina State Park – April 6

at Catalina State Park near Tucson AZ

Citizens for Solar – 31st Annual Solar Potluck

Saturday, April 6 from 10 am to sunset at Catalina State Park

The Solar Potluck is free and open to the public, although the park charges a $7/carload entry fee.

Please go to Citizens for Solar website for more info – citizensforsolar.org

Sprouting: The Art of Gardening in a Jar – April 11

at The Tasteful Kitchen, 722 North Stone Avenue, Tucson AZ

 

Sprouting: The Art of Gardening in a Jar

Join BASA and Wanda Poindexter on Thursday, April 11 to learn basic and intermediate tips for sprouting. Taste various types of sprouts, learn how economical it is to grow organic sprouts right in your own kitchen, and leave with recipes and all the materials you need to get started (please bring two clean 16-32 ounce glass jars).

Taught by Wanda Poindexter, Tucson’s local sprouting expert.

Cost: $10 or $25 for the class and a one-year BASA membership.
Date/Time: Thursday, April 11, 5:45 to 7:00pm (please arrive by 5:40 so we can get started right on time).
Location: The Tasteful Kitchen (recently voted one of Tucson’s best vegetarian, raw food, local foods restaurants), 722 North Stone Avenue.

Seating is limited and registration is required.
Contact Meghan at 520-331-9821 or meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org to sign up.

Cholla and Nopal Harvesting Workshop – April 18

West Side Tucson near Trails End and Camino de Oeste, Tucson AZ

 

Cholla Bud and Nopal Harvesting Workshop

Join Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture and Flor de Mayo to learn how to harvest, process, preserve, and cook with cholla buds and nopales, both traditional foods of the Native Peoples of the Sonoran desert. Cholla buds are a superfood with high available calcium and complex carbohydrates that help balance blood sugar levels and provide sustained energy. Nopales (prickly pear cactus pads) are high in vitamin A, vitamin C, and calcium, and also help balance blood sugar levels (great for diabetics!).

Taught by Martha Ames Burgess, ethnobotanist, herbalist, and traditional harvester.

Cost: $35 BASA members; $40 non-members (or $55 for the workshop and a one-year BASA membership).

Advance registration required. Contact Meghan at 520-331-9821 or meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org for further information or to sign-up.

The 4th Annual Water Festival – Tucson Arts Brigade – Earth Day – April 21

Earth Day at Reid Park, Tucson Arts Brigade presents
 

THE WATER FESTIVAL

Synergy of Art, Science, and Community

The 4th Annual Water Festival, presented by Tucson Arts Brigade, raises awareness and promotes stewardship for water and water-related themes relating to sustainability, health, and community.

The Water Festival brings community together through creative and diverse activities for learning, networking, and family friendly fun – featuring an exhibitor fair, workshops, speakers, performances, art show, “The Vibe” Live Art Happenings, Design for Water Solutions Contest, 3-mi Walk for Water, and a mermaid in a wishing well.

This year, The Water Festival is partnering with The Earth Day Festival at Reid Park on Sunday, April 21, 2013, 9am-2pm, and expects over 5,000 people.

 
CALL FOR PARTNERS, EXHIBITORS, ARTISTS & VOLUNTEERS!

Register as a Sponsor, Exhibitor, Artist / Inventor, Activity Leader, or Volunteer.

More info / Register:
phone: 520-623-2119
email: info(at)WaterFestivalTucson.org
web: www.WaterFestivalTucson.org

c/o Tucson Arts Brigade
PO Box 545, Tucson AZ 85702
www.TucsonArtsBrigade.org

Edgar Cahn, TimeBanks USA – How President Obama Can Beat The Odds And Make Good On His Commitments

How President Obama Can Beat The Odds And Make Good On His Commitments

from Edgar S. Cahn, CEO TimeBanks USA,
Distinguished Professor of Law, UDC David A. Clarke School of Law

In his Inaugural Address, President Obama made some commitments that seem to defy fiscal reality:

  “A little girl born into the bleakest poverty knows that she has the same chance to succeed as anyone else.”

  “We reject the belief that America must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future.”

  “We must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit.”

The problem: there are not enough funds, public, private, philanthropic to pay the cost, at market prices, for all the educational services and all the health care services needed to make good on those promises.

For a quarter century, the TimeBanking community has been demonstrating how to make the impossible possible.  There is vast untapped capacity in community.  We have proven that:

  • Healthy seniors and their families can provide reliable, informal care that reduces medical costs.

  • Fifth graders can tutor third graders who otherwise fail to attain essential reading levels.

  • Teenagers can tutor elementary school children using evidence-based cross-age peer tutoring.

How could this get paid for?  How can we record, recognize and reward labor from a work force that is not recognized or valued by the GDP?  For decades, the TimeBank community in the United States and thirty four other countries has been learning how to do it, teaching us all that every one of us has something special to give.

The function of a medium of exchange is to put supply and demand, capacity and need together.  What money does not value, TimeBanking does.  TimeBanking provides a tax-exempt, local medium of exchange that uses Time as a currency.  One hour helping another (regardless of mainstream market value) equal one Time Credit.  TimeBanking has proven capable of harnessing vast untapped capacity that the market does not value to address vast unmet needs.

Ask the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation which just made a major award to Neighborhood Health Centers of Lehigh Valley to utilize its TimeBank program as a resource to help build a super utilizer intervention program to reduce health care costs.  For ten years, home visits by Lehigh Valley TimeBank members functioning as health coaches and providing informal support have helped folks with chronic problems stay healthy and at home.

Ask Mayor Bloomberg’s Department for the Aging which has established TimeBank programs for seniors in all five boroughs to provide the kind of informal support needed to promote health and prevent unnecessary utilization of the emergency room care by elders.

Ask the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (with a 3,000 member TimeBank) that reports that 79% of TimeBank members felt that their membership gives them support they need to be able to stay in their homes and community as they get older and 100% reported they have benefited from becoming a TimeBank member.

Ask the National Education Association or do a Google search to see if Cross-Age Peer Tutoring rates the status of an evidence-based instructional and remedial strategy.

Ask the Washington State Office of Public Instruction for its authoritative manual on Cross-Age Peer Tutoring.

Ask the National Science Foundation why it granted nearly $1million dollars to Pennsylvania State University Center for Human-Computer Interaction to develop mobile apps for TimeBanking so every Smartphone user can be a time banker.

It’s time America discovered its vast hidden wealth: people not in the work force – seniors, teenagers, children, the disabled – whose energy and capacity has been tapped by TimeBanking for over a quarter century to strengthen fragile families, rebuild community, enhance health, promote trust, restore hope.

President Obama, if you want to do the impossible, it’s time to bet on each other and on our collective capacity.  TimeBanking supplies a medium of exchange that translates “Created Equal” into a currency that embodies that equality.  If we take it to scale, we can make good on delivering those “inalienable rights” to life, liberty and pursuit of happiness promised to every one of us by the Founding Fathers.

Also see TimeBanks USA and Tucson Time Traders

Sonoran Permaculture Guild – 18th Annual Permaculture Design Course – 5 weekends starting Feb 9

5 weekends starting Feb 9 in Tucson AZ

Sonoran Permaculture Guild
18th Annual Permaculture Design Course

This Permaculture certification course covers all aspects of sustainable design with a Southwest dry lands flavor, including a balance of hands on experience, classroom time, and design practicum. Dynamic exercises encourage pattern recognition, noticing the links between plants and animals, climate, and landforms that make up natural ecosystems.

The course focuses on dry land communities with a strong urban and semi-rural emphasis, addressing individual site and neighborhood “problems”, such as storm water flooding. Students learn to read the landscape, to map and analyze energies flowing through a site, and to develop integrated designs for sustainable systems.

Our course closely follows the standard 72 hour format developed by Bill Mollison and others. The weekend format of the course makes it easier for people who hold a week day job to attend and promotes better integration of the course material into daily life.

Dates for the the upcoming 2013 course are the following weekends – Feb. 9-10, Feb. 16-17, March 2-3, March 16-17, March 23-24

Cost $695, or $650 for early registration before January 25th.  There is also a class book fee of $42 for a copy of Introduction to Permaculture by Bill Mollison. Also highly recommended is Brad Lancaster’s Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands Vol 1 and Vol 2.

For the last seventeen years this course has been full with a waiting list, so early registration is encouraged. To give a high quality educational experience, we limit the size of the class to eighteen participants. A limited number of Partial scholarships are available.

Contact Dan, the course registrar, dorsey(at)dakotacom.net or 520-624-8030 to register or receive more information.

Sonoran Permaculture Guildwww.sonoranpermaculture.org

Worldwide GLOBE at Night 2013 Campaign

Worldwide GLOBE at Night 2013 Campaign

What would it be like without stars at night? What is it we lose? Starry night skies have given us poetry, art, music and the wonder to explore. A bright night sky (aka light pollution) affects energy consumption, health and wildlife too. Spend a few minutes to help scientists by measuring the brightness of your night sky. Join the GLOBE at Night citizen-science campaign. The first campaign starts January 3 and runs through January 12.

GLOBE at Night is a worldwide, hands-on science and education program to encourage citizen-scientists worldwide to record the brightness of their night sky. During five select sets of dates in 2013, children and adults match the appearance of a constellation (Orion or Leo in the northern hemisphere, and Orion and Crux in the southern hemisphere) with seven star charts of progressively fainter stars. Participants then submit their choice of star chart at www.globeatnight.org/webapp with their date, time and location. This can be done by computer (after the measurement) or by smart phone or pad (during the measurement). From these data an interactive map of all worldwide observations is created.

There are 5 GLOBE at Night campaigns in 2013: January 3 – 12, January 31 – February 9, March 3 – 12, March 31 – April 9, and April 29 – May 8.

Over the past 7 years of 10-day campaigns, people in 115 countries have contributed over 83,000 measurements, making GLOBE at Night the most successful, light pollution citizen-science campaign to date. The GLOBE at Night website is easy to use, comprehensive, and holds an abundance of background information. Guides, activities, one-page flyers and postcards advertising the campaign are available at www.globeatnight.org/pdf. Through GLOBE at Night, students, teachers, parents and community members are amassing a data set from which they can explore the nature of light pollution locally and across the globe.

Listen to a fun skit on GLOBE at Night in a 7-minute audio podcast at http://365daysofastronomy.org/2012/12/17/december-17th-the-dark-skies-crusader-retires-globe-at-night-returns/

Visit us on the Web: www.globeatnight.org
Find us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/GLOBEatNight
Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/GLOBEatNight
Subscribe to our mailing list for updates: globeatnight-list-on(at)noao.edu
Contact us: globeatnight(at)noao.edu

Sustainable Tucson joins Tucson Timebank

Sustainable Tucson joins Tucson Timebank

Sustainable Tucson is a co-sponsor of our local timebank Tucson Time Traders, and Sustainable Tucson is also a member of Tucson Time Traders.

If you volunteer for Sustainable Tucson in the working groups, monthly meetings, or in other ways, you can get hours of credit in the timebank from Sustainable Tucson for the hours you contribute.  Likewise, if you benefit from the work of Sustainable Tucson, or would like to make a donation in support of the work, you can give some of your timebank credit to Sustainable Tucson.

Here is Sustainable Tucson’s member profile in the timebank,

About

Sustainable Tucson
Tucson Arizona USA Earth
www.sustainabletucson.org

Sustainable Tucson is a non-profit grass-roots organization, building regional resilience and sustainability through awareness raising, community engagement, and public/private partnerships.  Our members focus their action, advocacy, and research through working groups addressing the unprecedented challenges of our time, economic meltdown, climate change, population pressures, and resource depletion.

The mission of Sustainable Tucson is to create a community-wide network of people and organizations, facilitating and accelerating Tucson’s transition to sustainability through education and collaborative action.

Offered

Free Public Presentations – monthly meetings with speakers, documentaries, and audience discussion on sustainability issues in relation to education, politics, technologies, projects, and organizations – see www.sustainabletucson.org

Working Groups and Networking on sustainability topics – Water, Food, Green Building, Health & Healthcare, Nature Conservation, Waste Management & Recycling, Money & Local Currency, Neighborhoods & Communities, Transportation, Whole Systems, Climate Change, Renewable Energy, Economics & Relocalization, Politics & Activism, Education & Media, Arts & Culture – also see wanted

Website – current events calendar, local & global sustainability resource links (business, educational, government, and nonprofit organizations), and an archive of news & information articles and event postings since 2006 – www.sustainabletucson.org

Wanted

Leadership and participation in our sustainability working groups, and speakers and facilitators for our monthly public meetings on sustainability (see offered)

Help with updating and organizing our wordpress-based website www.sustainabletucson.org

Funding and donations to cover our operating expenses.  Also, your personal donations of timebank credit here in appreciation for the value of what we are providing (for example if you learned something important at a monthly meeting or from the website).  Your donated timebank credit will help us give timebank credit to our volunteers who are donating their time to the work of Sustainable Tucson.  Thank you!

If you’d like to join Tucson Time Traders, or would like more information, please go to timetraders.metasofa.org or come to a timebank orientation meeting.

ST January 2013 Meeting – Jan 14

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Downtown (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

Sustainable Tucson 2013
How We Can Take Action in the New Year

Lots of powerful efforts are happening in Tucson and around the world to make a more sustainable and secure future. Join Sustainable Tucson on Monday, January 14 as we begin a new year and decide on the main focuses of Sustainable Tucson in 2013.

This year, Sustainable Tucson will continue our efforts to help you find ways you can take action to make your own life, Tucson, and the whole world more and more sustainable.

At the January meeting, we will join our passions and find the areas that we really want to act on. Our goal is to find those things that not only excite you, but excite a lot of people. That way, it isn’t each of us acting alone. It is many people acting together.

What’s your passion – Having healthy, local food to eat? Tackling our share of global climate change? Developing a sustainable local economy that serves Tucson? – Come to this month’s Sustainable Tucson General Meeting and find others who share your passions. It is time to act… together.

Please join us Monday, January 14th, 2013 at the Joel Valdez Library, lower level meeting room.

Doors open at 5:30 pm
The meeting will begin at 6:00 pm
Free and open to the public

Also see Sustainability Actions Everyone Can Do and personally What You Can Do – Top 10, sketches for community-wide Sustainability Plans in the menu above, and articles & resources in the Topics in Focus menu and Archive Categories below.

Chasing Ice – special film opening at The Loft – Dec 14

at The Loft, 3233 E Speedway, Tucson AZ
Tucson Climate Action Networking starting at 7pm

Chasing Ice

Co-presented by the University of Arizona’s Institute of the Environment, featuring a special introduction by the Institute of the Environment on opening night, Friday, December 14th at 7:30 pm

Tucson Climate Action Network will be tabling before and after the screening as a networking opportunity for our local groups working on the climate crisis, including TUCAN and 350Tucson as well as Citizens Climate Lobby, Sustainable Tucson, and Physicians for Social Responsibility.

Best Cinematography, Sundance Film Festival 2012
Named to the short list for the 2013 Academy Award for best documentary!
Watch the trailer at www.chasingice.com

Acclaimed National Geographic photographer James Balog was once a skeptic about climate change. But through his Extreme Ice Survey (EIS), he discovers undeniable evidence of our changing planet. In Chasing Ice, Balog deploys revolutionary time-lapse cameras to capture a multi-year record of the world’s changing glaciers. His hauntingly beautiful videos compress years into seconds and capture ancient mountains of ice in motion as they disappear at a breathtaking rate.

Traveling with a team of young adventurers across the brutal Arctic, Balog risks his career and his well-being in pursuit of the biggest story facing humanity. As the debate polarizes America, and the intensity of natural disasters ramps up globally, Chasing Ice depicts a heroic photojournalist on a mission to deliver fragile hope to our carbon-powered planet.

Directed by Jeff Orlowski, 2012, US, 75 min., Rated PG-13, Submarine Films, HD Digital

“NYT CRITICS PICK! Full of stunning images in addition to being timely … as watchable as it is important.” —Neil Genzlinger, New York Times

“This amazingly beautiful, and amazingly frightening, documentary captures the immediacy of what climate change is doing to the Arctic landscape.” —Joe Neumaier, New York Daily News

“Dramatic … Chasing Ice aims to accomplish, with pictures, what all the hot air that has been generated on the subject of global warming hasn’t been able to do: make a difference.” —Michael O’Sullivan, Washington Post

The Loft Cinema, www.loftcinema.com, phone 520-795-7777

Review: The Resilience Imperative: Cooperative Transitions to a Steady State Economy

Review: The Resilience Imperative: Cooperative Transitions to a Steady State Economy

by Jon Walker

 

What I love most about this book is the feeling you get that there is hope: solutions to environmental, social and financial crises do exist, they have been tried and tested all over the planet and all we have to do is get on with it.

 

The book is remarkable from several points of view. The extent and the depth of knowledge on which the arguments are based is truly impressive: it provides a history of money and corporations and co-operatives and land trusts from all over planet – emphasising the initiatives which have worked and survived and those which have been crushed by authoritative regimes.

 

Much of this needs to be common knowledge, for example, many successful banks which charged low-cost fees rather than interest were simply rendered illegal by their governments; booming cooperative movements were destroyed in Italy in 1921 (8,000 coops), in Germany in 1933 (4.5 million members) and Russia in 1918 (26,000 coops).

 

As the history unfolds it becomes clear that many of the kinds of institutions I had assumed were just out-performed by the corporations and banks were never given a chance. In reality, those in power just got rid of them. But there are many survivors – like the JAK bank in Sweden (which doesn’t charge interest) and the Cooperative Group in the UK – both of which continue to flourish.

 

The conclusions derived from this and several other innovations in the book are unavoidable: interest free banking does work and slashes the costs of borrowing, community land trusts are growing and enable far cheaper housing than freehold land schemes, cooperatives continue to grow and employ more people than all the multi-nationals put together. There are better co-operative economy ways to do almost everything: we don’t have to destroy our eco-systems and economics can be re-designed to benefit everyone.

 

The book is packed with inspiration – on local food, energy, housing, farming and, weaving all of this together, a better way of dealing with money. Perhaps the most impressive achievement is the way that the authors manage to hold all these elements together and demonstrate that resilience requires changes in all aspects of our lives. They show we need to change basic attitudes to almost everything, and to create a new set of values where well-being and eco-system health are more important than a set of numbers in your digital bank account. And, as the title suggests, a policy change away from economic growth as the primary objective to a resilient, sustainable way of living is fundamental.

 

The answers are everywhere. We can build houses which require almost no heating, we can feed ourselves with predominantly local foods, we can use the sun and wind and tides to generate energy, we can create communities which live in balance with their environment. The big questions still remain unanswered, however. Can we turn away from the current paradigm and begin to put all these ideas into practice for everyone, rather than see them working just in isolated pockets of resilience?

 

The authors argue their case at several levels but, for me, a constant thread is the need to reform the money-system; this stands out as a pre-requisite for broad-based change. As long as the majority of humanity is trapped into massive debt repayment, the possibilities for change will remain muted.

 

The solutions emerge clearly. We need access to debt-free money, we need access to commonly-held land, we need cooperative businesses which are designed for the benefit of the people who work or use them, we need regional solutions. And we need everyone to play their part in the transformation: a resilient society will only emerge from the efforts of resilient individuals and families. Functioning participatory democracy is needed at all levels from the work-place to the community to local government right up to the global. The authors are clear that international organisations like the farmers federation, La Via Campesina, are of crucial importance in building global alternatives to the current economic systems controlled by corporations and unelected bodies like the WTO.

 

So what if we all decided to live like this? The authors lead us gently through the consequences for the (very average) Hartwick family. For several of the proven innovations they provide us detailed calculations that they bring down to the household level to show the achievable dollar and cent savings. For example, the combined savings for an average household like the Hartwick’s in Canada over 25 years would be $363,000 if fee based financing, community land trust and basic energy conservation measures were applied. For the Hartwicks, a middle class family on average income, this translates into 12,095 hours of work at their wage level; imagine, this saving of almost 500 working hours per year. If one then adds back in the increased cost of paying a fair price for organic food over that time period, one would be better off to the tune of $286,969 plus have time left over to raise some food. Less debt means less pressure to grow, thus one could help save the planet and also save significant cash.

 

In many ways the books feels like a (nonviolent) call-to-arms: everything is collapsing around us, solutions exist and have been shown to work, and as governments seem completely incapable of doing anything, it really is down to the rest of us to stand up and be counted. So get this book and read it slowly – there is a huge amount to inwardly digest – and then decide what you’re going to do.

 

To misquote a previous work proposing radical change: all we have to lose are our economic chains and the threat of catastrophic climate collapse.

 

Jon Walker has worked in the UK co-operative sector since the 1970s, setting up and co-managing shops, warehouses, small-scale manufacturing coops, and most recently a community owned green grocer. He is also a member of the local Transition Town which is working to establish a local food economy, and finding ways to make with the local housing stock more energy efficient. He also lectures and publishes on the application of systems theory to co-operative organisational issues: his current book written with Angela Espinosa “A complexity approach to sustainability” examines the application of the Viable Systems model to the creation of a sustainable world from the individual to the global.

 

Published by Resilience.org on November 26, 2012

Published on Energy Bulletin (http://www.energybulletin.net)

 

Content on this site is subject to our fair use notice.

 

Energy Bulletin is a program of Post Carbon Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping the world transition away from fossil fuels and build sustainable, resilient communities.

 

Source URL: http://www.energybulletin.net/stories/2012-11-26/review-the-resilience-imperative-cooperative-transitions-to-a-steady-state-economy

 

Links:

[1] http://www.resilience.org/stories/2012-11-26/review-the-resilience-imperative-cooperative-transitions-to-a-steady-state-economy

 

Natural Beekeeping – NS/S free salon – Oct 15

at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N Campbell Ave, Tucson AZ
(note new time 5 to 7 pm)

Natural Beekeeping with Jaime de Zubeldia from ReZoNation Farm

Why is beekeeping so popular? What do we need to know about beekeeping specific to our region? Local beekeeper Jaime will share natural beekeeping methods and provide an understanding of how honeybees interact with their environment. Learn how to increase their numbers for reproduction and avoid hive disease.

Native Seeds/SEARCH Salons happen every third Monday of the month at our Retail Store at 3061 N. Campbell Ave, and have a little something for anyone who has ever wielded a fork or pitchfork. Bring your juiciest ideas and appetite for mind-watering conversations.

Native Seeds/SEARCH is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization based in Tucson, Arizona.

Fermentation Talk and Workshop with Sandor Katz – NS/S – Oct 22

Free, at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N Campbell Ave, Tucson AZ

Can’t get enough kombucha, kimchi, or sauerkraut? Join us for a special evening with fermentation revivalist Sandor Katz, author of the bestselling Wild Fermentation. Sandor will answer your questions and share tips from his latest book The Art of Fermentation, which offers the most complete guide to home fermentation ever published. Copies will be on sale for a book signing after the discussion.

Earth Harmony Festival – Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage – Oct 6-7

at Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage, Tumacácori, AZ (South of Tucson)
Free admission, donations appreciated

Earth Harmony Festival

A weekend celebration devoted to creating a sustainable future now. EcoVillage tours on water harvesting, green building, organic gardening, solar energy, composting, and more. Live music, food, arts, children’s village, hay rides, pony rides, and other activities including special eco-presentations featuring Gary Nabhan.

For info & directions – http://earthharmonyfestival.org/ or call (520) 398-2542

 

Earth Harmony Festival Promotes Global Cooperation to Achieve Sustainability

Tumacácori, Arizona – Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage presents the Earth Harmony Festival, a weekend celebration devoted to creating a sustainable future now. The festival will be held Saturday & Sunday, October 6-7th in Tumacácori, Arizona, South of Tucson.

The vision of the Earth Harmony Festival is to encourage a restoration of balance to the world’s people and ecosystems through environmental awareness, education, and a commitment to peace and unity without uniformity. Festival coordinator TiyiEndea DellErba says, “This year’s Earth Harmony Festival shares some practical solutions to the social, spiritual and environmental issues we face in our world today.”

The Earth Harmony Festival is held at Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage, one of the largest member EcoVillages in the world, nestled on 165-acres in the beautiful Santa Cruz Valley. Their sustainable practices include organic farming, education and the preservation of food diversity, permaculture principles, green building techniques, water harvesting, composting, alternative clean energy, and more. Avalon Gardens’ Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program was the first established in Arizona, feeding more than 100 people since 1995.

Internationally-celebrated author Gary Paul Nabhan will be the keynote speaker on Saturday, October 6th. Nabhan is a conservation biologist, a seed saver, and sustainable agriculture activist and has been called “the father of the local food movement”.

The core of the festival will be the ongoing tours of their working EcoVillage. From Solar Panels, to Rain Water Harvesting, to Organic Gardening, to Green Buildings, to Home-Made Goat Cheese, these EcoVillage tours will have something for every interest. Participants are encouraged to donate for the tours to help foster the EcoVillage’s many projects which are prototypes for creating a more sustainable, environmentally-conscious world.

In addition, live music, fine local art, locally made breads, food, and other natural products’ booths, a children’s village, hay rides, and special presentations by Master Gardeners, Kamon Lilly and Tarenta Baldeschi, will round out the weekend festivities.

Live music for the festival is provided by Global Change Music Nonprofit Record Label, featuring TaliasVan & The 11-piece Bright & Morning Star Band performing CosmoPop, music of the future for minds of the future. Additional artists performing are Van’sGuard, Starseed Acoustic Ensemble, and The Change Agents Band. Global Change Music lyrics speak of taking action against any form of injustice. Global Change Music promotes sustainable living, which includes growing organic food, building green, permaculture, sharing services and goods (trade and barter), and having a protective environmental consciousness.

Admission to the festival is free. Donations are appreciated to help support Avalon Gardens Internships and the Personality Integration Rehabilitation Program — nonprofit programs that assist individuals from diverse backgrounds in various levels of healing, training, and education in order to actualize their dreams and talents.

Amadon DellErba, an activist and festival promoter, encourages people to Occupy Avalon Gardens for a few days at the Earth Harmony Festival. “I hope this festival can teach and inspire others to live a more sustainable lifestyle, to come out of the age of competition, and into the age of cooperation.”

The Earth Harmony Festivals were started in the late 1990s by Gabriel of Urantia and Niánn Emerson Chase in Sedona, Arizona.

Camping is available by donation. For more information and camping reservations visit http://earthharmonyfestival.org/ or call 520-398-2542.

Sam Hughes Neighborhood Garden Tour – Oct 21

get tickets at Sam Hughes Elementary School, 700 N Wilson

 

Sam Hughes Neighborhood Garden Tour on Sunday October 21

Sam Hughes Neighborhood is having a first-time garden tour featuring 8 residen

ces and 2 public properties, including demonstration site for the “first in the nation” neighborhood phenology trail. Phenology is the study of the timing of plant and animal life cycles.

The tour will feature water harvesting, solar, water features, xeriscaping, hardscape, raised beds, a rooftop view, hummingbird garden, gazing balls, outdoor cooking features, use of color, sculptures.

Garden tour sponsor is Solar Solution AZ, LLC, which will be available at the tour to answer questions about solar energy.

Admission $10 adults, free for children with paying adult; get tickets at Sam Hughes Elem. School, 700 N. Wilson, 12 noon to 5 p.m.Rich Text AreaToolbarBold (Ctrl / Alt+Shift + B)Italic (Ctrl / Alt+Shift + I)Strikethrough (Alt+Shift+D)Unordered list (Alt+Shift+U)Ordered list (Alt+Shift+O)Blockquote (Alt+Shift+Q)Align Left (Alt+Shift+L)Align Center (Alt+Shift+C)Align Right (Alt+Shift+R)Insert/edit link (Alt+Shift+A)Unlink (Alt+Shift+S)Insert More Tag (Alt+Shift+T)Toggle spellchecker (Alt+Shift+N)▼
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get tickets at Sam Hughes Elementary School, 700 N Wilson

Sam Hughes Neighborhood Garden Tour on Sunday October 21
Sam Hughes Neighborhood is having a first-time garden tour featuring 8 residences and 2 public properties, including demonstration site for the “first in the nation” neighborhood phenology trail. Phenology is the study of the timing of plant and animal life cycles.
The tour will feature water harvesting, solar, water features, xeriscaping, hardscape, raised beds, a rooftop view, hummingbird garden, gazing balls, outdoor cooking features, use of color, sculptures.
Garden tour sponsor is Solar Solution AZ, LLC, which will be available at the tour to answer questions about solar energy.
Admission $10 adults, free for children with paying adult; get tickets at Sam Hughes Elem. School, 700 N. Wilson, 12 noon to 5 p.m.
Path:

Second Annual Home-scape Tour – Watershed Management Group – Oct 20

Tucson, AZ

 

Second Annual Watershed Management Group Home-scape Tour
Saturday, October 20

Did the new City of Tucson rainwater-harvesting rebate rouse your interest in capturing the rain that falls on your own property?

Curious about implementing other backyard sustainability practices such as chicken coops, food production, greywater, composting systems, and even solar-heated outside showers?

Not really sure where to start and what practices are best suited to you and your site?

Watershed Management Group’s second annual Home Tour will demonstrate best water saving practices and more. Come and find out how landscape water savings do not equal zero scape or even necessarily Xeriscape, how soil building can have multiple benefits.

The self-guided tour will be on Saturday October 20 between 10 am to 4 pm. Residents will be on hand to guide tourists through the green-living features at their homes, as well as give tips and answer questions about their site and installations.

Cost is $5 to those on a bike or using public transportation and $10 to those in a car. Discounts are available for those who rideshare. Children under 14 participate free!

Local bike Co-op BICAS will be leading a leisurely ride taking in many of the sites. Leave from BICAS at 10 a.m. Cost of $10 with half the proceeds going to WMG and half to BICAS.

For more information visit our home tour website or contact Rhiwena Slack at co-op(at)watershedmg.org or 520-396-3266. To sign up click here.

www.watershedmg.org

Harvest Festival – NS/S Conservation Farm – Sep 15 (changed from Sep 22)

at NS/S Conservation Farm
(note: changed from Sep 22 to Sep 15 !)

 

Reap, Chomp, and Stomp

This Saturday, September 15, 2012 3pm to dark

FARM TOURS ▪ CROP HARVESTING ▪ BEAN STOMPING ▪
POTLUCK DINNER ▪ MUSIC ▪ FRIENDS ▪ FUN!

Please bring:  Appropriate clothing incl. hat, water, a dish, silverware,
and a yummy locally grown organic dish to share

See website for directions to Farm: www.nativeseeds.org

Fall 2012 One Day Workshops – Sonoran Permaculture Guild

Fall 2012 One Day Workshops – Sonoran Permaculture Guild

For full class descriptions, registration information, and FAQs for these workshops, please go to http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

 

Designing a Home Greywater System – September 22nd, 2012

This one-day class provides a basic understanding of residential greywater system design, function, application, and applicable building codes. Participants will work with an aerial photo of their own residence (provided by the instructor) to identify and evaluate the potential of their own greywater sources and design a workable plan for a greywater system for their own home. Class will end with a short walking tour (less than 1 mile) of greywater systems at several permculture sites in the neighborhood.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Wild Foods of the Sonoran Desert – September 29th, 2012

Learn to eat from what you find in the forest! Join local herbalist, John Slattery, on a wild foraging journey in our local Santa Rita Mountains. We will be exploring the great diversity of native wild foods which exist in our local habitat. Numerous wild foods will be identified, and we will gather and prepare some select edibles. Basic topics covered will include: Proper Identification of Edible Species, Time of Year for Proper Harvest, Methods of Preparation, Location, Environment, and Habitat for each Plant. We will carpool to the Santa Rita Mountains.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Introduction to Growing Food at Home – October 6, 2012

The future of sustainable agriculture will be in small to medium scale organic food gardens grown right in and around our cities. In this workshop that includes hands-on work, you will learn how to set up a complete desert vegetable garden. We will show you how to increase your garden’s health, production, and nutrient value, using an integrated system of compost, mulch, companion plant selection, and irrigation to improve fertility, structure, and life in your soil, and produce food with minimum water use. We will conclude the class with an exploration of “food forests”- a diverse layering of annual and perennial food plants that can help increase garden health through permaculture strategies.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Introduction to Permaculture Design – October 13th, 2012

In this design workshop, you will learn how to map out the natural story of the place where you live. Then you will put together an exciting, long term plan for your sustainable home and landscape – one that takes care of people and takes care of the environment at the same time. We will practice the skills and strategies needed to do Permaculture design, like mapping out the natural and person-made forces that effect our site and using simple elevation finding tools. Bring a sketch of your site or yard that you want to design. This class is held at the Sonoran Permaculture Guild’s Ramada classroom site one and a half miles north of downtown Tucson, where you will see Permaculture design and implementation demonstrated on site.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Build A Straw Bale House or Wall, Tuesday evening – October 16th, 2012

In this non-hands on seminar you will learn about straw bale construction and the advantages of super insulation, thick walls, and ease of construction. Handouts and a complete discussion of the current straw bale code, detail drawings of windows and doors, and additional tips to make your building experience easier are included. This class also includes a complete slide show from start to finish on how to build a straw bale house or wall, as well as a demonstration of special tools and props that work well with straw bale construction. Co-Sponsored by Pima Community College.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Natural Building and Passive Solar Design – October 20th, 2012

This workshop includes hands on work with straw bales, adobe blocks,cob, and plasters. We’ll do hands on building of small structures like benches and walls – projects that you can easily do at your own place to create beautiful outdoor spaces. After this hands on work in the morning we’ll cover the building codes related to these materials used in larger projects. We will talk about and demonstrate the main principles of good passive solar design. This class emphasizes integrated design and getting back in touch with the patterns of nature, so we can make design decisions that are in tune with the environment. Using these natural building materials can help make our living environments more healthy and comfortable, and save us money on utility bills.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Introduction to Natural Beekeeping – October 20th and 21st, 2012

Want to be a bee keeper but don’t know where to start? How about a full weekend of hands on instruction with one of the Southwest’s most experienced bee keepers? This two day introductory beekeeping workshop in Avra Valley just west of Tucson, Arizona will get you started. Each day may be taken separately as a one day introduction also. The role of bees in a regenerative permaculture design will be discussed and compared to conventional “industrial” methods of hive maintenance and honey production. We will look at the reproduction patterns of the honey bee, the expansion and contraction patterns of the hive throughout the seasons, the roles of queen, worker and drone, and the honey bee’s complex set of duties such as pollination, storing nectar and pollen, and making wax. Suggested reading: The Buzz about Bees, Biology of a Superorganism, by Jurgen Tautz, The Biology of the Honeybee, by Mark L. Winston, and Introduction to Permaculture, by Bill Mollison.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Hands On Water Harvesting for your Landscape – November 3rd, 2012

Learning how to use rainfall and storm water run-off is one of the keys to developing a sustainable and lush landscape. Rainwater harvesting helps us to reduce erosion and have a lush multi use landscape without having to import water from outside our bioregion or overpump the groundwater table. In this hands on workshop we will install a metal culvert water cistern, learn how to read the water situation on a site, and do basic calculations on the water flow available. We will install basic earthworks to hold water on site, and talk about contours, plant selection, and mulching. This workshop is more than learning about techniques for harvesting rainwater; it will show you how water harvesting can be integrated into your own lifestyle and into a simple landscape design for your home.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Herbal Winter Apothecary: Create Your Own Medicines – November 10th, 2012

Be prepared to ward off illness and promote your vitality! Join local herbalist, John Slattery, for a day of medicine making in preparation for the winter cold and flu season. You will learn to make a variety of preparations (syrups, teas, oxymels, etc.) ideally suited for common viral infections. In our discussions we will explore the nature of host resistance and how to enhance it, and take a closer look at our local herbal pharmacopeia. Each participant will take home some herbal preparations we create in class and the knowledge to make it for themselves. All materials are included in the class fee.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Raising Chickens for Eggs and/or Meat – November 18th, 2012

This is a one-day introductory class is for anyone interested in raising chickens for the production of eggs and/or meat. Participants will gain a basic understanding of chicken coop design and construction. This will include a material cost-breakdown for a very basic coop with an easy to follow building plan. Strategies for incorporating a backyard flock into an overall Permaculture based system will be demonstrated and discussed. We will cover how to “tame” your birds and how to teach children to be around them. This class will cover heat tolerant breeds, raising day old chicks, feed requirements, composting, free ranging, predator protection, the pecking order, & culling. A special emphasis on homemade chicken accessories such as feeders, nesting boxes, watering facilities, and kill cones will be included. For participants interested in staying we will demonstrate how to cull a chicken at the end of the class. Recommended Reading Materials: CITY CHICKS: Keeping Micro-flocks of Chickens as Garden Helpers by Patricia Foreman; Storey’s Guide to Raising Chickens by Gail Damerow; Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2 by Brad Lancaster; and Introduction to Permaculture by Bill Mollison

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

 

Fall 2012 One Day Workshops – Sonoran Permaculture Guild

For full class descriptions, registration information, and FAQs for these workshops, please go to http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/ or contact Dan at dorsey(at)dakotacom.net or 520-624-8030

www.sonoranpermaculture.org

Wild Foods of the Sonoran Desert – John Slattery – Sep 29

carpool from Tucson AZ to the Santa Rita Mountains
 

Wild Foods of the Sonoran Desert

John Slattery

Learn to eat from what you find in the forest!

Join local herbalist, John Slattery on a wild foraging journey in our local Santa Rita Mountains. We will be exploring the great diversity of native wild foods which exist in our local habitat. Numerous wild foods will be identified, and we will gather and prepare some select edibles.

Basic topics covered will include: Proper Identification of Edible Species, Time of Year for Proper Harvest, Methods of Preparation, Location, Environment, and Habitat for each Plant.

Date: Saturday, September 29th, 2012
Time: 7:30 AM to 3:30 PM
Cost: $70 – includes all class materials and handouts

We will carpool to the Santa Rita Mountains. Our meeting place will be announced upon registration.

Please bring proper walking shoes, protection from the sun, adequate water for a full day of sun exposure, and a packed lunch.

Contact John at desertortoisebotanicals(at)gmail.com with any questions about the class content.
Contact Dan at dorsey(at)dakotacom.net or 520-624-8030 for registration.

ST September Meeting – Sept 10 – Sustainability of Urban Mobility and Urban Form continued – Broadway Boulevard Project

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Downtown (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

Broadway Boulevard Project:
Sustainable Urban Mobility and Form?

As a follow up to Sustainable Tucson’s July meeting, The Sustainability of Urban Mobility and Urban Form, the September 10th meeting will be convening a public conversation furthering the discussion, using the Broadway Boulevard Project as a focus.

Presenters will include
Jen Burdick – Broadway Corridor project manager for the TDOT
Colby Henley – Citizen’s Task Force and local Neighborhood Association member
Tres English – Sustainable Tucson
• and others to be announced

Efforts to incorporate local Neighborhood goals with those of the transportation planning agencies are moving forward through the efforts of the Broadway Citizen’s Task Force (CTF). By the time Sustainable Tucson convenes its meeting on September 10th, the CTF will have conducted 2 public meetings. The findings of the 1st meeting are posted online at http://cms3.tucsonaz.gov/broadway

Neighborhood and City goals should be updated and integrated given the interrelated issues of mobility and urban form. In this age of fiscal and environmental constraints, we have the opportunity (and calling) to redirect limited funds to support live-ability and vibrancy at the neighborhood level while implementing a transportation system that unites and serves the larger city. Additionally, now is the time to address larger embedded issues such as the Urban Heat Island effect (UHI) and Climate Change.

A recent Arizona State University study by leading author, Matei Georgescu (http://geoplan.asu.edu/georgescu-megapolitan) notes that urban development could by itself, increase average June-August temperatures by as much as 7 degrees Fahrenheit by 2050. Add in another 5 degrees due to the effects of greenhouse gas emissions over the same period (United States Global Change Research Project), and it becomes apparent “business as usual” will significantly affect the health, live-ability, and pocketbooks of Tucsonans.

To mitigate temperatures neither current nor future inhabitants of Tucson want to endure and to ensure live-able and vibrant communities we must seek alternatives to current built-environment and mobility practices that solve rather than add to an unsustainable city. The Broadway Boulevard Project discussion is a great place to start.

Join us in conversation September 10th at the Joel Valdez Library, lower level meeting room.

Doors open at 5:30 pm.
The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

Tucson Time Traders – 2012 aug

Community Picnic/Potluck & Orientation Meetings

at Tucson Ward 3 Office, 1510 E Grant Road (southeast corner of Grant & Vine)
2nd Thursdays, 6 to 8 pm – Aug 9 – Sep 13 – Oct 11 – Nov 8 – Nov 18 (sunday 6:30-8:30pm) – Dec 13

at Himmel Park Library, 1035 N Treat Avenue (1 block south of Speedway)
many Saturdays, noon to 2 pm – Aug 25 – Sep 8 & 22 – Oct 6 & 20 – Nov 3 – Dec 1 (11:30-1:30) – Dec 22

(please go to timetraders.metasofa.org for latest details, dates and times)

We’re also at Sustainable Tucson Monthly Meetings (usually 2nd Monday every month) to give information about timebanking and Tucson Time Traders, and help you sign up online.

 

TUCSON TIME TRADERS

Building Tucson’s Empowerment Network 1 Hour at a Time

Tucson Time Traders is a local Timebank for the Tucson region.  You can go to our website and check our latest calendar & news, or open a new account, or login if you’re a member – http://timetraders.metasofa.org

Community Picnic/Potluck & Orientation Meetings

Everyone is invited to our timebank community orientation meetings, with optional picnic lunch / potluck dinner in the first hour, and a timebank orientation meeting for the second hour.

Before trading with our timebanking community, new members must attend an orientation meeting so we can meet each other in person, and also so we can help everyone make better use of the website.

Experienced members are always welcome and appreciated, and everyone gets one hour of time credit for each meeting attended.  Everyone’s participation is valuable, and benefits everyone in our timebanking community.

Looking forward to seeing you!

Tucson Time Traders has moved to a new website !

Thank you all for your patience and help – We now have a website and timebanking software that simply works.

Our new website includes a community calendar, discussion blog, time banking, and member profiles for finding people and their offers and wants.  It’s all accessible with any web browser, new or old, on your desktop, laptop, or mobile device.  It’s fast and simple to use, and easy to learn – for people who have no time to waste!

Local community currency and timebanking have been waiting decades to be live online with this kind of software, so that it’s finally possible for people to find each other easily, and exchange time and energy transparently and fairly, with almost zero overhead.

You can go to the new website here – timetraders.metasofa.org

Cookbook Author Janet Taylor – NS/S Retail Store – Aug 12

Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N. Campbell Ave. 2 p.m. FREE

SAMPLE THE SOUTHWEST! Hungry for local food inspirations?  Join us for a special engagement with Southwestern chef and cookbook author Janet Taylor.  Ms. Taylor will have delectable samplings on hand from recipes in her latest publication, The Green Southwest Cookbook.  Spend your Sunday afternoon exploring the culinary delights of our flavorful region!

www.nativeseeds.org

Sustainable Tucson August Film Festival – August 12th and 13th

at Joel D. Valdez Main Downtown Library, Large Lower Level Meeting Room, 101 N. Stone, (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

 

Sunday, August 12th 1:00 to 5:00pm, Sustainable Tucson will show three top-rated sustainability films covering critical sustainability topics:

• The U.S. financial crisis erupted in 2008 and still looms on the horizon.

• Resource depletion including non-renewable fossil fuels and clean water threatens further economic growth.

• Global warming and climate change threaten most life-forms including people and future food.

• Social disruption following economic dislocation and government contraction can threaten our capacity to solve-problems and build a more sustainable culture.

• Many solutions are being identified but most require abandoning “business as usual.”

The first film will be shown from 1:00 to 2:30pm and includes a comprehensive presentation of the sustainability crisis and a path way out of our predicament. Many sustainability leaders are interviewed including  Wes Jackson, Paul Hawken, David Suzuki, Kenny Ausubel, David Orr, Janine Benyus,, Stuart Pimm, Richard Heinberg, Paolo Soleri, Thom Hartmann, Lester Brown, James Hillman, Joseph Tainter, James Woolsey, Stephen Schneider, Stephen Hawking, Sandra Postel,  Bill McKibbon, James Hansen, Dr. Andy Weil, Ray Anderson, Andy Lipkis, Tom Linzey, Herman Daly, Peter Warshall, Jerry Mander, Mikhail Gorbachev, Bruce Mau, William McDonough, John Todd, and Gloria Flora among others.

The second film is an award-winning documentary describing the financial crisis which erupted in 2008 and continues to play out today as the global economy is beginning to contract. Financial experts help tell the story of how the largest financial bubble in history grew and finally burst. These include Simon Johnson, George Soros, Satyajit Das, Paul Volker, Nouriel Roubini, U. S. Rep. Barney Frank, Eliot Spitzer, Kenneth Rogoff, Raghuram Rajan, Martin Wolf, Christine Lagarde, and Martin Feldstein among others. This film will be shown from 2:30 to 4:15.

The final film to be shown from 4:15 to 5:00 is a special film which describes how the island nation of Cuba became more self- sufficient and resilient after the food and energy subsidies ended from the Soviet Union which collapsed in 1991.

 

Monday, August 13th, 5:00 to 8:00 pm, Sustainable Tucson will present two excellent films.

The first is a documentary about how the many electric street car systems in U.S towns and cities were intentionally scrapped by a group of automobile-related corporations. The result is that the U.S. is the only industrial country in the world without electric rail systems within and between most cities.  This film will be shown from 5:00 to 6:00pm.

The second film will be shown from 6:15 to 7:45pm and includes a comprehensive presentation of the sustainability crisis and the need to find a path way out of our predicament. Many sustainability leaders are interviewed including Richard Heinberg, Lester Brown, U. S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, Albert Bartlett, Joseph Tainter, David Pimental, Terry Taminen, Bill McKibben, James Hansen, David Korten, Derrick Jensen, and William R. Catton, Jr. among others.

Due to unanswered questions about public licensing, the titles of the films were omitted in this public announcement. The Pima-Tucson Library System does have a general license for showings of films free to the public for educational purposes. This license is granted by a film company consortium but we don’t know for sure about each film. ST falls back on its “fair use” rights under copyright laws to show the films for educational purposes.

We believe that building a sustainable future will take the cooperation and partnering of residents, businesses, government, institutions and organizations. It is in this spirit that we are reaching out to our members, interested people, and community leaders, bringing them together to focus the wider public on these critical sustainability discussions. Our ultimate intent is to build partnerships and work together toward our common goals.

Join us for viewing five great sustainability films in August!

PLEASE NOTE:

Doors open at 1:00 pm on Sunday, August 12th.
Doors open at 4:45 pm on Monday, August 13th

Sustainable Tucson July Meeting – Urban Mobility and Urban Form – July 9

at Joel D. Valdez Main Downtown Library, 101 N. Stone, (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

The Sustainability of
Urban Mobility and Urban Form

The July ST General Meeting will feature panel presentations and conversation by special Tucson speakers who are addressing in their work “Sustainable mobility and urban form.” This is a very timely topic on many fronts now:

  City of Tucson’s current ten-year update of the General Plan.

  Anticipation of Tucson’s modern streetcar line.

  Tucson’s love affair with walking, jogging, biking, hiking and using transit.

  Community visioning and planning related to the Imagine Greater Tucson Project.

  The emergence of “urban villages” as places where we could live.

  City of Tucson’s current climate change mitigation and adaptation planning.

  Local adaptation to the global credit and energy contraction now taking place.

Gene Caywood, local transportation planner and leading light for Old Pueblo Trolley presents Tucson mobility: past, present, and future.

Ian Johnson, co-leader of the Living Streets Alliance discusses ways we can all help to create, maintain, and enjoy the culture of “living streets” combining sidewalks, bike paths, and transit where people meet and move.

Steve Farley, Arizona State legislator and public artist talks about the benefits of sustainable transportation and advocacy.

Ann Chaneka,  Pima Association of Governments bicycle planner and recently returning from the international Velo conference in Vancouver presents sustainable urban transportation and bicycle planning.

Tres English, ST Core Team member, talks about “21st Century Tucson – a Network of Urban Villages – More convenient, More accessible, More affordable – NOT More mobile.”

We believe that building a sustainable future will take the cooperation and partnering of residents, businesses, government, institutions and organizations. It is in this spirit that we are reaching out to our members, interested people, and community leaders, bringing them together to focus the wider public on these critical sustainability discussions. Our ultimate intent is to build partnerships and work together toward our common goals.

Join us for another lively Sustainable Tucson General meeting!

Doors open at 5:30 pm.
The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

Also read James Howard Kunstler’s Making Other Arrangements

Occupy Arcology – ecological city design lecture & discussion – June 26

Free, at Historic Y conference room, 738 North 5th Ave (at University)

 

OCCUPY ARCOLOGY LECTURE – June 26

Come be a part of a lecture and lively discussion on Occupy Arcology. In this part of the lecture series, hosted by Occupy Tucson’s Doctress Neutopia, we will focus on the question of ecology and economy within the context of an arcology (ecological city design). Any knowledge you have about alternative economics—alternative currencies, time banks, labor relationships, the rights of nature, etc, are welcome in our discussion. So, please come and share your wisdom and knowledge.

Some of the questions to be raised in the discussion are:

What kind of economy fosters health and sustainability with our natural resources?
How do we move into a no-growth, zero-carbon city?
How would William McDonough’s “cradle-to-cradle industrials” move us beyond 20th Century industrials that are polluting our world?
What kind of labor-force is needed to construct an evolutionary city design?
Do we need a new definition of work?
What would a feminist economy, outlined in Riane Eisler’s book The Real Wealth of Nations, look like?
How do we convert military monies into building solar-powered arcologies so that a peace time economy can lead us into a beautiful future?

When: Tuesday June 26th, 2012
Time: 5:00 – 6:30 P.M.
Place: Historic Y’s conference room, 738 North 5th Ave (at University)

For More Info: Contact doctress(at)lovolution.net

Also see http://www.lovolution.net/MainPages/arcology/arcology.htm

Bisbee Solar Cookoff – June 2

Free, at Bisbee Farmers Market (in Vista Park in the Warren District)

 

Bisbee Solar Cookoff
June 2, 2012 – 10am to 1pm

Join Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture and the Bisbee Farmers Market for their annual Solar Cookoff.  Activities will include solar cooking demonstrations as well as solar ovens and accessories for sale.

At 11am, join local experts for a Solar Cooking Basics class.  At noon, learn how to build your own solar oven with a cardboard box and aluminum foil.

Feel free to bring a solar oven and join in the competition. A potluck and voting will follow the event for those who prepare solar food.

Location: Bisbee Farmers Market (in Vista Park in the Warren District)
Cost: Free

For more info, visit www.bajaaz.org/calendar

Questions?  Contact Meghan at meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org or 520-331-9821, Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture

Summer Hours at the Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market

Thursdays 4-7 PM, all Summer, at 100 S Avenida del Convento, west of I-10, near the intersection of Congress and Grande

Summer hours begin at the Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market on Thursday, May 3rd. Summer hours are Thursdays, 4-7 PM.

The Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market is located at 100 S. Avenida del Convento, West of I-10, near the intersection of Congress and Grande.

For more info, call Marie at 520-882-3313

Dad’s Farm Tour – Huachuca City – May 6

May 6 from 10am to 3pm – Free!
at 30 W. Ivey Road in Huachuca City, just one mile north of Mustang Corners on Hwy 90

Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture, the Sierra Vista Farmers’ Market, and Dad’s Farm sponsor the opportunity to spend a day on a working farm.

Learn viable food production methods for the Sierra Vista area, get gardening tips from an experienced farmer, observe spring/summer crops or the fruit & nut orchard, or learn about mulching and watering systems!

The tour will also include a sustainable agriculture fair with informational booths and local farmers, ranchers, and value-added producers.

For the kids there is a petting zoo, a horse-drawn wagon, and opportunities to experiment with planting seeds.

For further info, visit www.bajaaz.org/calendar or contact Meghan at meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org or 520-331-9821

How do you move through the city? – Worker Transit Authority

Free – April 27 & 28, May 4 & 5, May 11 & 12 – 5 pm to 8 pm
 
210 East Broadway, Downtown Tucson Arizona

The Worker Transit Authority asks the community

“How do you move through the city?”

A Convergence of Art and Planning

For three weekends in a series of free public events, Tucson residents can participate in this important discussion about land use, infrastructure, transportation, environment and distribution.

Like actual transit authority public process, this project is a form of civic engagement, but unlike actual transit authority pubic process the WTA events are fun!

The project wraps art, parody, and beauty to format new and radical notions of how we can function as individuals and as a society, including an overview of the Worker Transit Authority (WTA), the Consumer Transit System (CTS) & the Bicycle-centric Approach to Planning (BcAP).

The exhibits include interactive maps, brochures, surveys, drawings, sculptures, videos and text.

 

Bill Mackey of Worker, Inc. will present events that incorporate performance, graphics, and data in a participatory manner designed to facilitate discussion among the community.

Collaborators include Jeffrey Buesing, Ben Olmstead, Peter Wilke, Tyler Jorgenson, Dwight Metzger, Cook Signs, Ron and Patricia Schwabe, and the Apparatchiks.

For further information, visit www.workertransitauthority.com from your PC or mobile device and get involved. Feel free to ‘take the survey’ on our homepage.

Funded through the Tucson Pima Arts Council / Kresge Arts in Tucson ll: P.L.A.C.E. Initiative Grants. In kind support from Reproductions Inc., Peach Properties, Organic Kitchen & Zocalo Magazine. Letters of support from City of Tucson Department of Transit, City of Tucson Ward I and VI, Living Streets Alliance, Downtown Partnership, Drachman Institute, Department of Geography University of Arizona, College of Architecture University of Arizona, City of Tucson Office of Conservation & Sustainable Development.

 

Worker Inc. is a company that specializes in exploring the human connections to the built environment, bridging the theory and practice of architecture, the social sciences, planning and art. Since 2009, Worker Inc. has been instrumental in the production of community exhibits – Downtown Tucson Master Plans, Food Paper Alcohol, and You Are Here. The exhibits combine ART + PLANNING, creating a unique platform that is an act of discovery for the community. Visit www.workerincorporated.com for more information about Bill Mackey and Worker, Inc.

Bill Mackey 520.664.4847 workerarchitect(at)yahoo.com

Solar Potluck And Exhibition – April 28

at Catalina State Park, 11570 N Oracle Road

 

Solar Potluck And Exhibition

Citizens for Solar invites you to our 30th Annual Solar Potluck And Exhibition. Saturday, April 28, 2012 at Catalina State Park 11570 N. Oracle Road, 10 am til Sunset.

Solar cooker food, solar displays, speakers, and solar powered musicians.

Dinner at 5pm – bring a dish, drink, ice, plate, and silver if you can.

Free with $7 park entrance fee.

Visit us at www.citizensforsolar.org

Green Fest: A Celebration of Green Living – Tucson Village Farm – April 7

Bookmans, Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona and Tucson Village Farm Gear Up for Green Fest: A Celebration of Green Living

GREENFEST 2012

Date: Saturday, April 7, 2012
Time: 10:00am – 3:00pm
Location: Tucson Village Farm, 4210 N. Campbell Ave (Across from Trader Joe’s at Campbell and River)
Cost: FREE

Are you interested in “greening” your life? Well Tucson, get ready for a full day of interactive learning and green fun! Bookmans in partnership with the Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona host the third annual GreenFest on April 7 at Tucson Village Farms. This free event features kids activities and green vendors and shows how easy it is to embark upon an eco-friendly lifestyle. To further encourage sustainable and healthful living, reusable water bottles will be given to the first 250 attendees and $5 Bookmans coupons will be handed out to all who ride their bike to the event.

From its inception GreenFest has been dedicated to educating and inspiring the community – children and adults, individuals and families, urban and rural – to build better and greener communities. Tucson provides the perfect stage for such efforts as it already has a plethora of bike paths, smart water usage, farmer’s markets and clean air. Girls Scouts Chief Operating Officer Kristen Culliney notes, “Our goal is to truly engage the community, show them all the amazing things happening locally, and create opportunities to green their lives. Every year the variety of topics at GreenFest expands as does the number of participants. The result is a true collaborative effort where we have something for just about everyone! We cannot wait and hope you join us.”

Festivities to take place at GreenFest include gardening tips from Tucson Organic Gardeners, compost details from Fairfax Companies, tomato starts from Aravaipa Heirlooms and solar frozen ice cream from Isabella’s Ice Cream who will be driving to the event using electric power. Arizona Feeds County Store, Mrs. Green’s World, Tucson Village Farms, the Community Food Bank, GeoInnovation, Habitat for Humanity, Heifer International, Renee’s Organic Oven, Tucson Macaroni Kid, A Slice of Heaven, Prickly Pops, Technicians for Sustainability, Tucson Clean and Beautiful and the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension will be on hand with their products and to answer your questions.

Come to GreenFest, enjoy the fresh springtime air and see how small changes can make a big impact when done together.

For more information visit: http://bookmans.com/content/greenfest-2012 or look us up on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/GreenFestTucson

About Girl Scouts
Girl Scouts is the world’s preeminent leadership development organization dedicated to helping build girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. GSSoAz serves over 14,000 girls in Southern Arizona and includes over 1,500 adult volunteers. For more information on Girl Scouting in Southern Arizona, please contact Maria DeCabooter, Advocacy Specialist, 520.319.3175, mdecabooter(at)girlscoutssoaz.org