Seeds of Freedom – Tucson Film Premiere – Oct 16

at Native Seeds / SEARCH Conservation Center, 3584 E River Road, Tucson AZ

 

Seeds of Freedom – Tucson film premiere

In conjunction with World Food Day and part of the Act for Seed Freedom Fortnight, we will screen a short documentary exploring the importance of seed saving and the current threats to the practice.

A discussion led by NS/S Executive Director Bill McDorman will follow the film.

Location: NS/S Conservation Center, 3584 E River Road

$5 suggested donation.

Limited seating – register at info@nativeseeds.org

NativeSeeds.orgGMOFreeTucson.org

Fermentation Talk and Workshop with Sandor Katz – NS/S – Oct 22

Free, at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N Campbell Ave, Tucson AZ

Can’t get enough kombucha, kimchi, or sauerkraut? Join us for a special evening with fermentation revivalist Sandor Katz, author of the bestselling Wild Fermentation. Sandor will answer your questions and share tips from his latest book The Art of Fermentation, which offers the most complete guide to home fermentation ever published. Copies will be on sale for a book signing after the discussion.

Rainwater Harvesting Rebate Class – WMG – Oct 11

Rainwater Harvesting Rebate Class

Spaces are still available in Watershed Management Group’s upcoming session to fulfill the educational requirement for Tucson Water’s rainwater-harvesting rebate. The next class is scheduled for Thursday, October 11, from 2 to 5 p.m.

Tucson Water is offering rebates on qualifying rainwater harvesting projects, including tanks and earthworks. Two tiers of rebates cover full-system expenses up to $300 or 50 percent of expenses up to $2,000. A requirement to receive the rebate program is attendance at a three-hour educational session such as this one. We expect to offer approximately one session per month, depending on demand.

Complete information and online registration can be found here or by calling 520-396-3266.

Storm Water Harvesting – WMG Green Living Co-op Workshops – Oct 11,13,14,21,27

Click these links for more details:

Thursday October 11, 7am – 12pm
Saturday October 13, 8am – 1pm
Sunday, October 14, 7am – 12pm

Sunday, October 21, 8am – 1pm

Saturday, October 27, 8am – 1pm

 

Watershed Management Group – Residential Green Infrastructure Workshops

Join Watershed Management Group’s Tucson Green-living Co-op for a series of workshops this October that are designed to turn a stormwater problem into a plant irrigating, street shading, solution. We will use Green infrastructure techniques to slow down and keep storm water on site and to divert street floods into streetside infiltration basins via curb cuts.

These small scale Green infrastructure workshops will be associated with a single residence and the home owner will be required to maintain the basins both on their property and in the right of way.

Watershed Management Group’s Green Living Co-op has been helping Tucson residents install home-conservation features since 2008. Based on a barn-raising model (which we call “doing labor with your neighbor”), free Co-op membership allows residents to earn a discount on installations at their own homes by volunteering hours at other members’ homes.

All workshops are led by WMG’s expert workshop instructors, who can also help design professional water harvesting systems that qualify for both Tucson Water’s rainwater-harvesting and greywater rebates.

Visit www.watershedmg.org/co-op for more information,
and see WMG’s Tucson calendar www.watershedmg.org/calendar-tucson

Special Food Day Screening of Genetic Roulette – Oct 24

at The Loft Cinema, 3233 E Speedway Blvd, Tucson AZ

Special Food-Oriented Presentation for Food Day, a day to celebrate healthy, sustainable food production: Movie Screening at 7 p.m. of the new groundbreaking definitive documentary on the health risks of genetically modified foods, Genetic Roulette: The Gamble of Our Lives, followed by a panel discussion of modern-day issues, problems, and solutions surrounding GMOs and the takeover of our seed supply with Bill McDorman, Executive Director of Native Seeds/SEARCH, and Melissa Diane Smith, GMO Free Project of Tucson Director of Education. $5.00 suggested donation, but no one will be turned away.

Be sure to arrive early – both to get a good seat and to visit a mini-expo of tables from sustainably oriented businesses on the patio in front of the theater before the movie. Seating will begin at 6 p.m.

See the movie trailer

More about the movie:

Are you and your family on the wrong side of a bet?

When the US government ignored repeated warnings by its own scientists and allowed untested genetically modified (GM) crops into our environment and food supply, it was a gamble of unprecedented proportions. The health of all living things and all future generations were put at risk by an infant technology.

After two decades, physicians and scientists have uncovered a grave trend. The same serious health problems found in lab animals, livestock, and pets that have been fed GM foods are now on the rise in the US population. And when people and animals stop eating genetically modified organisms (GMOs), their health improves.

This seminal documentary provides compelling evidence to help explain the deteriorating health of Americans, especially among children, and offers a recipe for protecting ourselves and our future.

GMO Free Project of Tucson – www.gmofreetucson.org

Genetic Roulette – Free Movie Showing – Oct 11

Free, at the Crossroads Theater, 4811 E Grant Road, Tucson AZ

 
A FREE movie screening  of the new groundbreaking definitive documentary on the health risks of genetically modified foods, Genetic Roulette: The Gamble of Our Lives, followed by a Q & A by Melissa Diane Smith, GMO Free Project of Tucson Director of Education.

Please register for your free seat at www.geneticrouletteoct11.eventbrite.com

(If you don’t have internet access, you may call 520-481-1128 to register)

This screening is part of the NON-GMO Month Education Series presented by GMO Free Project of Tucson, Native Seeds/SEARCH, Wellness First, Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture, Envision Tucson Sustainable Festival, and Tucson Food Day.

Thank you to our sponsors New Life Health Centers, Native Seeds/SEARCH, The Tasteful Kitchen and Wellness First.

See the movie trailer

More about the movie:

Are you and your family on the wrong side of a bet?

When the US government ignored repeated warnings by its own scientists and allowed untested genetically modified (GM) crops into our environment and food supply, it was a gamble of unprecedented proportions. The health of all living things and all future generations were put at risk by an infant technology.

After two decades, physicians and scientists have uncovered a grave trend. The same serious health problems found in lab animals, livestock, and pets that have been fed GM foods are now on the rise in the US population. And when people and animals stop eating genetically modified organisms (GMOs), their health improves.

This seminal documentary provides compelling evidence to help explain the deteriorating health of Americans, especially among children, and offers a recipe for protecting ourselves and our future.

GMO Free Project of Tucson – www.gmofreetucson.org

Earth Harmony Festival – Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage – Oct 6-7

at Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage, Tumacácori, AZ (South of Tucson)
Free admission, donations appreciated

Earth Harmony Festival

A weekend celebration devoted to creating a sustainable future now. EcoVillage tours on water harvesting, green building, organic gardening, solar energy, composting, and more. Live music, food, arts, children’s village, hay rides, pony rides, and other activities including special eco-presentations featuring Gary Nabhan.

For info & directions – http://earthharmonyfestival.org/ or call (520) 398-2542

 

Earth Harmony Festival Promotes Global Cooperation to Achieve Sustainability

Tumacácori, Arizona – Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage presents the Earth Harmony Festival, a weekend celebration devoted to creating a sustainable future now. The festival will be held Saturday & Sunday, October 6-7th in Tumacácori, Arizona, South of Tucson.

The vision of the Earth Harmony Festival is to encourage a restoration of balance to the world’s people and ecosystems through environmental awareness, education, and a commitment to peace and unity without uniformity. Festival coordinator TiyiEndea DellErba says, “This year’s Earth Harmony Festival shares some practical solutions to the social, spiritual and environmental issues we face in our world today.”

The Earth Harmony Festival is held at Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage, one of the largest member EcoVillages in the world, nestled on 165-acres in the beautiful Santa Cruz Valley. Their sustainable practices include organic farming, education and the preservation of food diversity, permaculture principles, green building techniques, water harvesting, composting, alternative clean energy, and more. Avalon Gardens’ Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program was the first established in Arizona, feeding more than 100 people since 1995.

Internationally-celebrated author Gary Paul Nabhan will be the keynote speaker on Saturday, October 6th. Nabhan is a conservation biologist, a seed saver, and sustainable agriculture activist and has been called “the father of the local food movement”.

The core of the festival will be the ongoing tours of their working EcoVillage. From Solar Panels, to Rain Water Harvesting, to Organic Gardening, to Green Buildings, to Home-Made Goat Cheese, these EcoVillage tours will have something for every interest. Participants are encouraged to donate for the tours to help foster the EcoVillage’s many projects which are prototypes for creating a more sustainable, environmentally-conscious world.

In addition, live music, fine local art, locally made breads, food, and other natural products’ booths, a children’s village, hay rides, and special presentations by Master Gardeners, Kamon Lilly and Tarenta Baldeschi, will round out the weekend festivities.

Live music for the festival is provided by Global Change Music Nonprofit Record Label, featuring TaliasVan & The 11-piece Bright & Morning Star Band performing CosmoPop, music of the future for minds of the future. Additional artists performing are Van’sGuard, Starseed Acoustic Ensemble, and The Change Agents Band. Global Change Music lyrics speak of taking action against any form of injustice. Global Change Music promotes sustainable living, which includes growing organic food, building green, permaculture, sharing services and goods (trade and barter), and having a protective environmental consciousness.

Admission to the festival is free. Donations are appreciated to help support Avalon Gardens Internships and the Personality Integration Rehabilitation Program — nonprofit programs that assist individuals from diverse backgrounds in various levels of healing, training, and education in order to actualize their dreams and talents.

Amadon DellErba, an activist and festival promoter, encourages people to Occupy Avalon Gardens for a few days at the Earth Harmony Festival. “I hope this festival can teach and inspire others to live a more sustainable lifestyle, to come out of the age of competition, and into the age of cooperation.”

The Earth Harmony Festivals were started in the late 1990s by Gabriel of Urantia and Niánn Emerson Chase in Sedona, Arizona.

Camping is available by donation. For more information and camping reservations visit http://earthharmonyfestival.org/ or call 520-398-2542.

Sam Hughes Neighborhood Garden Tour – Oct 21

get tickets at Sam Hughes Elementary School, 700 N Wilson

 

Sam Hughes Neighborhood Garden Tour on Sunday October 21

Sam Hughes Neighborhood is having a first-time garden tour featuring 8 residen

ces and 2 public properties, including demonstration site for the “first in the nation” neighborhood phenology trail. Phenology is the study of the timing of plant and animal life cycles.

The tour will feature water harvesting, solar, water features, xeriscaping, hardscape, raised beds, a rooftop view, hummingbird garden, gazing balls, outdoor cooking features, use of color, sculptures.

Garden tour sponsor is Solar Solution AZ, LLC, which will be available at the tour to answer questions about solar energy.

Admission $10 adults, free for children with paying adult; get tickets at Sam Hughes Elem. School, 700 N. Wilson, 12 noon to 5 p.m.Rich Text AreaToolbarBold (Ctrl / Alt+Shift + B)Italic (Ctrl / Alt+Shift + I)Strikethrough (Alt+Shift+D)Unordered list (Alt+Shift+U)Ordered list (Alt+Shift+O)Blockquote (Alt+Shift+Q)Align Left (Alt+Shift+L)Align Center (Alt+Shift+C)Align Right (Alt+Shift+R)Insert/edit link (Alt+Shift+A)Unlink (Alt+Shift+S)Insert More Tag (Alt+Shift+T)Toggle spellchecker (Alt+Shift+N)▼
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get tickets at Sam Hughes Elementary School, 700 N Wilson

Sam Hughes Neighborhood Garden Tour on Sunday October 21
Sam Hughes Neighborhood is having a first-time garden tour featuring 8 residences and 2 public properties, including demonstration site for the “first in the nation” neighborhood phenology trail. Phenology is the study of the timing of plant and animal life cycles.
The tour will feature water harvesting, solar, water features, xeriscaping, hardscape, raised beds, a rooftop view, hummingbird garden, gazing balls, outdoor cooking features, use of color, sculptures.
Garden tour sponsor is Solar Solution AZ, LLC, which will be available at the tour to answer questions about solar energy.
Admission $10 adults, free for children with paying adult; get tickets at Sam Hughes Elem. School, 700 N. Wilson, 12 noon to 5 p.m.
Path:

Envision Tucson Sustainable Festival – Oct 21

at Reid Park in Tucson AZ, free and open to the public

 

ENVISION TUCSON SUSTAINABLE FESTIVAL
A Community Event for a Bright Future

By Clinton MacKillop
September 26, 2012

Tucson, AZEnvision Tucson Sustainable and Sustainable Tucson announce the 2nd annual “Envision Tucson Sustainable” festival. The festival will take place at Reid Park on Sunday, October 21st, 2012, from 9am – 5pm. All ages are welcome.

Festival planners invite individuals and families to participate in a day of fun while exploring Tucson’s sustainable culture. The festival will promote the people, organizations, and companies in Tucson who provide services, education, and resources to help us achieve a sustainable future for our community.

The main focus of the festival this year is sustainable, secure food and agriculture for Tucson and Southern Arizona. This event will kick off a week of events in Tucson celebrating Food Day, a nationwide event promoting healthy, affordable, and sustainable food. Food vendors will feature locally sourced, organic refreshments. This year the Festival will also include a special feature: a “Non-GMO Food Zone.” In addition, in keeping with the theme, the festival will include practical information on aquaponics, an innovative, energy- and water-saving system of food production that fully integrates raising fish and growing vegetables, herbs, or other plants.

Throughout the festival, exhibits, demonstrations, and speakers will address many facets of a sustainable life, from energy and green business to health, from organic gardening to the homes we live in. The festival will be solar powered, thanks to the Solar Store, and there will be opportunities to learn about solar power for home or business.

A large family activity area will feature “Rexie,” the T-Rex Museum’s sustainability spokes-kid. Children will be able to hunt for and keep fossils from hundreds of millions of years ago.

The Festival is free and open to the public.

For more information, please visit www.facebook.com/EnvisionTucsonSustainable and click on events, or visit the festival website www.tucsonsustainable.org

For more information on Food Day events October 20-28, please visit www.tucsonfoodday.com

Second Annual Home-scape Tour – Watershed Management Group – Oct 20

Tucson, AZ

 

Second Annual Watershed Management Group Home-scape Tour
Saturday, October 20

Did the new City of Tucson rainwater-harvesting rebate rouse your interest in capturing the rain that falls on your own property?

Curious about implementing other backyard sustainability practices such as chicken coops, food production, greywater, composting systems, and even solar-heated outside showers?

Not really sure where to start and what practices are best suited to you and your site?

Watershed Management Group’s second annual Home Tour will demonstrate best water saving practices and more. Come and find out how landscape water savings do not equal zero scape or even necessarily Xeriscape, how soil building can have multiple benefits.

The self-guided tour will be on Saturday October 20 between 10 am to 4 pm. Residents will be on hand to guide tourists through the green-living features at their homes, as well as give tips and answer questions about their site and installations.

Cost is $5 to those on a bike or using public transportation and $10 to those in a car. Discounts are available for those who rideshare. Children under 14 participate free!

Local bike Co-op BICAS will be leading a leisurely ride taking in many of the sites. Leave from BICAS at 10 a.m. Cost of $10 with half the proceeds going to WMG and half to BICAS.

For more information visit our home tour website or contact Rhiwena Slack at co-op(at)watershedmg.org or 520-396-3266. To sign up click here.

www.watershedmg.org

Gardening for Wildlife and Sustainability – NS/S Green Bag Lunch – Sep 25

at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N Campbell Ave, Tucson

 

Gardening for Wildlife and Sustainability

with Kendall Kroesen

Tuesday, September 25, 2012
Noon – 1 pm

As the summer swelter recedes, we are excited to bring back your favorite mid-day brainfood break! Join us for the return of our Green Bag Lunch series with an afternoon nosh featuring Kendall Kroesen of Tucson Audubon Society. Kendall will give a  presentation to help us plan our winter gardens with the amazing wildlife of the Sonoran Desert in mind.

Green Bag Lunches are held on the last Tuesday of the month at our Retail Store at 3061 N. Campbell Avenue – a free “lunch-and-learn” gathering serving up plenty of food for thought. Bring your lunch and an appetite for mind-watering discussion!

www.nativeseeds.org

Harvest Festival – NS/S Conservation Farm – Sep 15 (changed from Sep 22)

at NS/S Conservation Farm
(note: changed from Sep 22 to Sep 15 !)

 

Reap, Chomp, and Stomp

This Saturday, September 15, 2012 3pm to dark

FARM TOURS ▪ CROP HARVESTING ▪ BEAN STOMPING ▪
POTLUCK DINNER ▪ MUSIC ▪ FRIENDS ▪ FUN!

Please bring:  Appropriate clothing incl. hat, water, a dish, silverware,
and a yummy locally grown organic dish to share

See website for directions to Farm: www.nativeseeds.org

Fall 2012 One Day Workshops – Sonoran Permaculture Guild

Fall 2012 One Day Workshops – Sonoran Permaculture Guild

For full class descriptions, registration information, and FAQs for these workshops, please go to http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

 

Designing a Home Greywater System – September 22nd, 2012

This one-day class provides a basic understanding of residential greywater system design, function, application, and applicable building codes. Participants will work with an aerial photo of their own residence (provided by the instructor) to identify and evaluate the potential of their own greywater sources and design a workable plan for a greywater system for their own home. Class will end with a short walking tour (less than 1 mile) of greywater systems at several permculture sites in the neighborhood.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Wild Foods of the Sonoran Desert – September 29th, 2012

Learn to eat from what you find in the forest! Join local herbalist, John Slattery, on a wild foraging journey in our local Santa Rita Mountains. We will be exploring the great diversity of native wild foods which exist in our local habitat. Numerous wild foods will be identified, and we will gather and prepare some select edibles. Basic topics covered will include: Proper Identification of Edible Species, Time of Year for Proper Harvest, Methods of Preparation, Location, Environment, and Habitat for each Plant. We will carpool to the Santa Rita Mountains.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Introduction to Growing Food at Home – October 6, 2012

The future of sustainable agriculture will be in small to medium scale organic food gardens grown right in and around our cities. In this workshop that includes hands-on work, you will learn how to set up a complete desert vegetable garden. We will show you how to increase your garden’s health, production, and nutrient value, using an integrated system of compost, mulch, companion plant selection, and irrigation to improve fertility, structure, and life in your soil, and produce food with minimum water use. We will conclude the class with an exploration of “food forests”- a diverse layering of annual and perennial food plants that can help increase garden health through permaculture strategies.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Introduction to Permaculture Design – October 13th, 2012

In this design workshop, you will learn how to map out the natural story of the place where you live. Then you will put together an exciting, long term plan for your sustainable home and landscape – one that takes care of people and takes care of the environment at the same time. We will practice the skills and strategies needed to do Permaculture design, like mapping out the natural and person-made forces that effect our site and using simple elevation finding tools. Bring a sketch of your site or yard that you want to design. This class is held at the Sonoran Permaculture Guild’s Ramada classroom site one and a half miles north of downtown Tucson, where you will see Permaculture design and implementation demonstrated on site.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Build A Straw Bale House or Wall, Tuesday evening – October 16th, 2012

In this non-hands on seminar you will learn about straw bale construction and the advantages of super insulation, thick walls, and ease of construction. Handouts and a complete discussion of the current straw bale code, detail drawings of windows and doors, and additional tips to make your building experience easier are included. This class also includes a complete slide show from start to finish on how to build a straw bale house or wall, as well as a demonstration of special tools and props that work well with straw bale construction. Co-Sponsored by Pima Community College.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Natural Building and Passive Solar Design – October 20th, 2012

This workshop includes hands on work with straw bales, adobe blocks,cob, and plasters. We’ll do hands on building of small structures like benches and walls – projects that you can easily do at your own place to create beautiful outdoor spaces. After this hands on work in the morning we’ll cover the building codes related to these materials used in larger projects. We will talk about and demonstrate the main principles of good passive solar design. This class emphasizes integrated design and getting back in touch with the patterns of nature, so we can make design decisions that are in tune with the environment. Using these natural building materials can help make our living environments more healthy and comfortable, and save us money on utility bills.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Introduction to Natural Beekeeping – October 20th and 21st, 2012

Want to be a bee keeper but don’t know where to start? How about a full weekend of hands on instruction with one of the Southwest’s most experienced bee keepers? This two day introductory beekeeping workshop in Avra Valley just west of Tucson, Arizona will get you started. Each day may be taken separately as a one day introduction also. The role of bees in a regenerative permaculture design will be discussed and compared to conventional “industrial” methods of hive maintenance and honey production. We will look at the reproduction patterns of the honey bee, the expansion and contraction patterns of the hive throughout the seasons, the roles of queen, worker and drone, and the honey bee’s complex set of duties such as pollination, storing nectar and pollen, and making wax. Suggested reading: The Buzz about Bees, Biology of a Superorganism, by Jurgen Tautz, The Biology of the Honeybee, by Mark L. Winston, and Introduction to Permaculture, by Bill Mollison.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Hands On Water Harvesting for your Landscape – November 3rd, 2012

Learning how to use rainfall and storm water run-off is one of the keys to developing a sustainable and lush landscape. Rainwater harvesting helps us to reduce erosion and have a lush multi use landscape without having to import water from outside our bioregion or overpump the groundwater table. In this hands on workshop we will install a metal culvert water cistern, learn how to read the water situation on a site, and do basic calculations on the water flow available. We will install basic earthworks to hold water on site, and talk about contours, plant selection, and mulching. This workshop is more than learning about techniques for harvesting rainwater; it will show you how water harvesting can be integrated into your own lifestyle and into a simple landscape design for your home.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Herbal Winter Apothecary: Create Your Own Medicines – November 10th, 2012

Be prepared to ward off illness and promote your vitality! Join local herbalist, John Slattery, for a day of medicine making in preparation for the winter cold and flu season. You will learn to make a variety of preparations (syrups, teas, oxymels, etc.) ideally suited for common viral infections. In our discussions we will explore the nature of host resistance and how to enhance it, and take a closer look at our local herbal pharmacopeia. Each participant will take home some herbal preparations we create in class and the knowledge to make it for themselves. All materials are included in the class fee.

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

Raising Chickens for Eggs and/or Meat – November 18th, 2012

This is a one-day introductory class is for anyone interested in raising chickens for the production of eggs and/or meat. Participants will gain a basic understanding of chicken coop design and construction. This will include a material cost-breakdown for a very basic coop with an easy to follow building plan. Strategies for incorporating a backyard flock into an overall Permaculture based system will be demonstrated and discussed. We will cover how to “tame” your birds and how to teach children to be around them. This class will cover heat tolerant breeds, raising day old chicks, feed requirements, composting, free ranging, predator protection, the pecking order, & culling. A special emphasis on homemade chicken accessories such as feeders, nesting boxes, watering facilities, and kill cones will be included. For participants interested in staying we will demonstrate how to cull a chicken at the end of the class. Recommended Reading Materials: CITY CHICKS: Keeping Micro-flocks of Chickens as Garden Helpers by Patricia Foreman; Storey’s Guide to Raising Chickens by Gail Damerow; Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2 by Brad Lancaster; and Introduction to Permaculture by Bill Mollison

For class details and registration info, please see http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/

 

Fall 2012 One Day Workshops – Sonoran Permaculture Guild

For full class descriptions, registration information, and FAQs for these workshops, please go to http://www.sonoranpermaculture.org/courses-and-workshops/ or contact Dan at dorsey(at)dakotacom.net or 520-624-8030

www.sonoranpermaculture.org

Designing a Home Greywater System – Sonoran Permaculture Guild – Sep 22

in Tucson AZ
 

Designing a Home Greywater System

Leona Davis, Sonoran Permaculture Guild

This one-day class provides a basic understanding of residential greywater system design, function, application, and applicable building codes.

Participants will work with an aerial photo of their own residence (provided by the instructor) to identify and evaluate the potential of their own greywater sources and design a workable plan for a greywater system for their own home. Some basic plumbing experience is helpful, but not required.

Class will end with a short walking tour (less than 1 mile) of greywater systems at several permculture sites in the neighborhood.

Taught by Leona Davis. Class size is limited to seven participants.

Date: Saturday, September 22nd, 2012
Time: 9:00AM – 4:00PM
Location: Site location provided with registration, one and a half miles north of downtown Tucson.
Cost: $49 – includes all workshop materials, handouts, and a plan you will produce on a greywater system for your own residence.

Call or e-mail Leona for registration or information. (520) 205-0067 or leonafdavis(at)gmail.com

ST September Meeting – Sept 10 – Sustainability of Urban Mobility and Urban Form continued – Broadway Boulevard Project

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Downtown (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

Broadway Boulevard Project:
Sustainable Urban Mobility and Form?

As a follow up to Sustainable Tucson’s July meeting, The Sustainability of Urban Mobility and Urban Form, the September 10th meeting will be convening a public conversation furthering the discussion, using the Broadway Boulevard Project as a focus.

Presenters will include
Jen Burdick – Broadway Corridor project manager for the TDOT
Colby Henley – Citizen’s Task Force and local Neighborhood Association member
Tres English – Sustainable Tucson
• and others to be announced

Efforts to incorporate local Neighborhood goals with those of the transportation planning agencies are moving forward through the efforts of the Broadway Citizen’s Task Force (CTF). By the time Sustainable Tucson convenes its meeting on September 10th, the CTF will have conducted 2 public meetings. The findings of the 1st meeting are posted online at http://cms3.tucsonaz.gov/broadway

Neighborhood and City goals should be updated and integrated given the interrelated issues of mobility and urban form. In this age of fiscal and environmental constraints, we have the opportunity (and calling) to redirect limited funds to support live-ability and vibrancy at the neighborhood level while implementing a transportation system that unites and serves the larger city. Additionally, now is the time to address larger embedded issues such as the Urban Heat Island effect (UHI) and Climate Change.

A recent Arizona State University study by leading author, Matei Georgescu (http://geoplan.asu.edu/georgescu-megapolitan) notes that urban development could by itself, increase average June-August temperatures by as much as 7 degrees Fahrenheit by 2050. Add in another 5 degrees due to the effects of greenhouse gas emissions over the same period (United States Global Change Research Project), and it becomes apparent “business as usual” will significantly affect the health, live-ability, and pocketbooks of Tucsonans.

To mitigate temperatures neither current nor future inhabitants of Tucson want to endure and to ensure live-able and vibrant communities we must seek alternatives to current built-environment and mobility practices that solve rather than add to an unsustainable city. The Broadway Boulevard Project discussion is a great place to start.

Join us in conversation September 10th at the Joel Valdez Library, lower level meeting room.

Doors open at 5:30 pm.
The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

Who Owns Our Food? – Native Seeds/SEARCH free monthly salon – Aug 20

Free at NS/S Retail Store, 3061 N. Campbell Ave.

 

“Who Owns Our Food?” with Bill McDorman

Aug. 20th, 5-7 pm (Note new time)

Ten companies own and control 75% of the worlds seeds. How does this affect local food security and the health of our region? More importantly what does this have to do with the nationwide drought and the treasure trove of seeds in the Native Seeds/SEARCH Seed Bank? Join NS/S Executive Director Bill McDorman for a deep discussion on this vital topic and hear about the solutions as close as your own backyard!

Tucson Time Traders – 2012 aug

Community Picnic/Potluck & Orientation Meetings

at Tucson Ward 3 Office, 1510 E Grant Road (southeast corner of Grant & Vine)
2nd Thursdays, 6 to 8 pm – Aug 9 – Sep 13 – Oct 11 – Nov 8 – Nov 18 (sunday 6:30-8:30pm) – Dec 13

at Himmel Park Library, 1035 N Treat Avenue (1 block south of Speedway)
many Saturdays, noon to 2 pm – Aug 25 – Sep 8 & 22 – Oct 6 & 20 – Nov 3 – Dec 1 (11:30-1:30) – Dec 22

(please go to timetraders.metasofa.org for latest details, dates and times)

We’re also at Sustainable Tucson Monthly Meetings (usually 2nd Monday every month) to give information about timebanking and Tucson Time Traders, and help you sign up online.

 

TUCSON TIME TRADERS

Building Tucson’s Empowerment Network 1 Hour at a Time

Tucson Time Traders is a local Timebank for the Tucson region.  You can go to our website and check our latest calendar & news, or open a new account, or login if you’re a member – http://timetraders.metasofa.org

Community Picnic/Potluck & Orientation Meetings

Everyone is invited to our timebank community orientation meetings, with optional picnic lunch / potluck dinner in the first hour, and a timebank orientation meeting for the second hour.

Before trading with our timebanking community, new members must attend an orientation meeting so we can meet each other in person, and also so we can help everyone make better use of the website.

Experienced members are always welcome and appreciated, and everyone gets one hour of time credit for each meeting attended.  Everyone’s participation is valuable, and benefits everyone in our timebanking community.

Looking forward to seeing you!

Tucson Time Traders has moved to a new website !

Thank you all for your patience and help – We now have a website and timebanking software that simply works.

Our new website includes a community calendar, discussion blog, time banking, and member profiles for finding people and their offers and wants.  It’s all accessible with any web browser, new or old, on your desktop, laptop, or mobile device.  It’s fast and simple to use, and easy to learn – for people who have no time to waste!

Local community currency and timebanking have been waiting decades to be live online with this kind of software, so that it’s finally possible for people to find each other easily, and exchange time and energy transparently and fairly, with almost zero overhead.

You can go to the new website here – timetraders.metasofa.org

Cookbook Author Janet Taylor – NS/S Retail Store – Aug 12

Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N. Campbell Ave. 2 p.m. FREE

SAMPLE THE SOUTHWEST! Hungry for local food inspirations?  Join us for a special engagement with Southwestern chef and cookbook author Janet Taylor.  Ms. Taylor will have delectable samplings on hand from recipes in her latest publication, The Green Southwest Cookbook.  Spend your Sunday afternoon exploring the culinary delights of our flavorful region!

www.nativeseeds.org

Sustainable Tucson August Film Festival – August 12th and 13th

at Joel D. Valdez Main Downtown Library, Large Lower Level Meeting Room, 101 N. Stone, (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

 

Sunday, August 12th 1:00 to 5:00pm, Sustainable Tucson will show three top-rated sustainability films covering critical sustainability topics:

• The U.S. financial crisis erupted in 2008 and still looms on the horizon.

• Resource depletion including non-renewable fossil fuels and clean water threatens further economic growth.

• Global warming and climate change threaten most life-forms including people and future food.

• Social disruption following economic dislocation and government contraction can threaten our capacity to solve-problems and build a more sustainable culture.

• Many solutions are being identified but most require abandoning “business as usual.”

The first film will be shown from 1:00 to 2:30pm and includes a comprehensive presentation of the sustainability crisis and a path way out of our predicament. Many sustainability leaders are interviewed including  Wes Jackson, Paul Hawken, David Suzuki, Kenny Ausubel, David Orr, Janine Benyus,, Stuart Pimm, Richard Heinberg, Paolo Soleri, Thom Hartmann, Lester Brown, James Hillman, Joseph Tainter, James Woolsey, Stephen Schneider, Stephen Hawking, Sandra Postel,  Bill McKibbon, James Hansen, Dr. Andy Weil, Ray Anderson, Andy Lipkis, Tom Linzey, Herman Daly, Peter Warshall, Jerry Mander, Mikhail Gorbachev, Bruce Mau, William McDonough, John Todd, and Gloria Flora among others.

The second film is an award-winning documentary describing the financial crisis which erupted in 2008 and continues to play out today as the global economy is beginning to contract. Financial experts help tell the story of how the largest financial bubble in history grew and finally burst. These include Simon Johnson, George Soros, Satyajit Das, Paul Volker, Nouriel Roubini, U. S. Rep. Barney Frank, Eliot Spitzer, Kenneth Rogoff, Raghuram Rajan, Martin Wolf, Christine Lagarde, and Martin Feldstein among others. This film will be shown from 2:30 to 4:15.

The final film to be shown from 4:15 to 5:00 is a special film which describes how the island nation of Cuba became more self- sufficient and resilient after the food and energy subsidies ended from the Soviet Union which collapsed in 1991.

 

Monday, August 13th, 5:00 to 8:00 pm, Sustainable Tucson will present two excellent films.

The first is a documentary about how the many electric street car systems in U.S towns and cities were intentionally scrapped by a group of automobile-related corporations. The result is that the U.S. is the only industrial country in the world without electric rail systems within and between most cities.  This film will be shown from 5:00 to 6:00pm.

The second film will be shown from 6:15 to 7:45pm and includes a comprehensive presentation of the sustainability crisis and the need to find a path way out of our predicament. Many sustainability leaders are interviewed including Richard Heinberg, Lester Brown, U. S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, Albert Bartlett, Joseph Tainter, David Pimental, Terry Taminen, Bill McKibben, James Hansen, David Korten, Derrick Jensen, and William R. Catton, Jr. among others.

Due to unanswered questions about public licensing, the titles of the films were omitted in this public announcement. The Pima-Tucson Library System does have a general license for showings of films free to the public for educational purposes. This license is granted by a film company consortium but we don’t know for sure about each film. ST falls back on its “fair use” rights under copyright laws to show the films for educational purposes.

We believe that building a sustainable future will take the cooperation and partnering of residents, businesses, government, institutions and organizations. It is in this spirit that we are reaching out to our members, interested people, and community leaders, bringing them together to focus the wider public on these critical sustainability discussions. Our ultimate intent is to build partnerships and work together toward our common goals.

Join us for viewing five great sustainability films in August!

PLEASE NOTE:

Doors open at 1:00 pm on Sunday, August 12th.
Doors open at 4:45 pm on Monday, August 13th

Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math – by Bill McKibben in Rolling Stone

Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math

Three simple numbers that add up to global catastrophe – and that make clear who the real enemy is

by Bill McKibben (350.org)

This story is from the August 2nd, 2012 issue of Rolling Stone.
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/global-warmings-terrifying-new-math-20120719

If the pictures of those towering wildfires in Colorado haven’t convinced you, or the size of your AC bill this summer, here are some hard numbers about climate change: June broke or tied 3,215 high-temperature records across the United States. That followed the warmest May on record for the Northern Hemisphere – the 327th consecutive month in which the temperature of the entire globe exceeded the 20th-century average, the odds of which occurring by simple chance were 3.7 x 10^99, a number considerably larger than the number of stars in the universe.

Meteorologists reported that this spring was the warmest ever recorded for our nation – in fact, it crushed the old record by so much that it represented the “largest temperature departure from average of any season on record.” The same week, Saudi authorities reported that it had rained in Mecca despite a temperature of 109 degrees, the hottest downpour in the planet’s history.

Not that our leaders seemed to notice. Last month the world’s nations, meeting in Rio for the 20th-anniversary reprise of a massive 1992 environmental summit, accomplished nothing. Unlike George H.W. Bush, who flew in for the first conclave, Barack Obama didn’t even attend. It was “a ghost of the glad, confident meeting 20 years ago,” the British journalist George Monbiot wrote; no one paid it much attention, footsteps echoing through the halls “once thronged by multitudes.” Since I wrote one of the first books for a general audience about global warming way back in 1989, and since I’ve spent the intervening decades working ineffectively to slow that warming, I can say with some confidence that we’re losing the fight, badly and quickly – losing it because, most of all, we remain in denial about the peril that human civilization is in.

When we think about global warming at all, the arguments tend to be ideological, theological and economic. But to grasp the seriousness of our predicament, you just need to do a little math. For the past year, an easy and powerful bit of arithmetical analysis first published by financial analysts in the U.K. has been making the rounds of environmental conferences and journals, but it hasn’t yet broken through to the larger public. This analysis upends most of the conventional political thinking about climate change. And it allows us to understand our precarious – our almost-but-not-quite-finally hopeless – position with three simple numbers.

The First Number: 2° Celsius

If the movie had ended in Hollywood fashion, the Copenhagen climate conference in 2009 would have marked the culmination of the global fight to slow a changing climate. The world’s nations had gathered in the December gloom of the Danish capital for what a leading climate economist, Sir Nicholas Stern of Britain, called the “most important gathering since the Second World War, given what is at stake.” As Danish energy minister Connie Hedegaard, who presided over the conference, declared at the time: “This is our chance. If we miss it, it could take years before we get a new and better one. If ever.”

In the event, of course, we missed it. Copenhagen failed spectacularly. Neither China nor the United States, which between them are responsible for 40 percent of global carbon emissions, was prepared to offer dramatic concessions, and so the conference drifted aimlessly for two weeks until world leaders jetted in for the final day. Amid considerable chaos, President Obama took the lead in drafting a face-saving “Copenhagen Accord” that fooled very few. Its purely voluntary agreements committed no one to anything, and even if countries signaled their intentions to cut carbon emissions, there was no enforcement mechanism. “Copenhagen is a crime scene tonight,” an angry Greenpeace official declared, “with the guilty men and women fleeing to the airport.” Headline writers were equally brutal: COPENHAGEN: THE MUNICH OF OUR TIMES? asked one.

The accord did contain one important number, however. In Paragraph 1, it formally recognized “the scientific view that the increase in global temperature should be below two degrees Celsius.” And in the very next paragraph, it declared that “we agree that deep cuts in global emissions are required… so as to hold the increase in global temperature below two degrees Celsius.” By insisting on two degrees – about 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit – the accord ratified positions taken earlier in 2009 by the G8, and the so-called Major Economies Forum. It was as conventional as conventional wisdom gets. The number first gained prominence, in fact, at a 1995 climate conference chaired by Angela Merkel, then the German minister of the environment and now the center-right chancellor of the nation.

Some context: So far, we’ve raised the average temperature of the planet just under 0.8 degrees Celsius, and that has caused far more damage than most scientists expected. (A third of summer sea ice in the Arctic is gone, the oceans are 30 percent more acidic, and since warm air holds more water vapor than cold, the atmosphere over the oceans is a shocking five percent wetter, loading the dice for devastating floods.) Given those impacts, in fact, many scientists have come to think that two degrees is far too lenient a target. “Any number much above one degree involves a gamble,” writes Kerry Emanuel of MIT, a leading authority on hurricanes, “and the odds become less and less favorable as the temperature goes up.” Thomas Lovejoy, once the World Bank’s chief biodiversity adviser, puts it like this: “If we’re seeing what we’re seeing today at 0.8 degrees Celsius, two degrees is simply too much.” NASA scientist James Hansen, the planet’s most prominent climatologist, is even blunter: “The target that has been talked about in international negotiations for two degrees of warming is actually a prescription for long-term disaster.” At the Copenhagen summit, a spokesman for small island nations warned that many would not survive a two-degree rise: “Some countries will flat-out disappear.” When delegates from developing nations were warned that two degrees would represent a “suicide pact” for drought-stricken Africa, many of them started chanting, “One degree, one Africa.”

Despite such well-founded misgivings, political realism bested scientific data, and the world settled on the two-degree target – indeed, it’s fair to say that it’s the only thing about climate change the world has settled on. All told, 167 countries responsible for more than 87 percent of the world’s carbon emissions have signed on to the Copenhagen Accord, endorsing the two-degree target. Only a few dozen countries have rejected it, including Kuwait, Nicaragua and Venezuela. Even the United Arab Emirates, which makes most of its money exporting oil and gas, signed on. The official position of planet Earth at the moment is that we can’t raise the temperature more than two degrees Celsius – it’s become the bottomest of bottom lines. Two degrees.

The Second Number: 565 Gigatons

Scientists estimate that humans can pour roughly 565 more gigatons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere by midcentury and still have some reasonable hope of staying below two degrees. (“Reasonable,” in this case, means four chances in five, or somewhat worse odds than playing Russian roulette with a six-shooter.)

This idea of a global “carbon budget” emerged about a decade ago, as scientists began to calculate how much oil, coal and gas could still safely be burned. Since we’ve increased the Earth’s temperature by 0.8 degrees so far, we’re currently less than halfway to the target. But, in fact, computer models calculate that even if we stopped increasing CO2 now, the temperature would likely still rise another 0.8 degrees, as previously released carbon continues to overheat the atmosphere. That means we’re already three-quarters of the way to the two-degree target.

How good are these numbers? No one is insisting that they’re exact, but few dispute that they’re generally right. The 565-gigaton figure was derived from one of the most sophisticated computer-simulation models that have been built by climate scientists around the world over the past few decades. And the number is being further confirmed by the latest climate-simulation models currently being finalized in advance of the next report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. “Looking at them as they come in, they hardly differ at all,” says Tom Wigley, an Australian climatologist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. “There’s maybe 40 models in the data set now, compared with 20 before. But so far the numbers are pretty much the same. We’re just fine-tuning things. I don’t think much has changed over the last decade.” William Collins, a senior climate scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, agrees. “I think the results of this round of simulations will be quite similar,” he says. “We’re not getting any free lunch from additional understanding of the climate system.”

We’re not getting any free lunch from the world’s economies, either. With only a single year’s lull in 2009 at the height of the financial crisis, we’ve continued to pour record amounts of carbon into the atmosphere, year after year. In late May, the International Energy Agency published its latest figures – CO2 emissions last year rose to 31.6 gigatons, up 3.2 percent from the year before. America had a warm winter and converted more coal-fired power plants to natural gas, so its emissions fell slightly; China kept booming, so its carbon output (which recently surpassed the U.S.) rose 9.3 percent; the Japanese shut down their fleet of nukes post-Fukushima, so their emissions edged up 2.4 percent. “There have been efforts to use more renewable energy and improve energy efficiency,” said Corinne Le Quéré, who runs England’s Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research. “But what this shows is that so far the effects have been marginal.” In fact, study after study predicts that carbon emissions will keep growing by roughly three percent a year – and at that rate, we’ll blow through our 565-gigaton allowance in 16 years, around the time today’s preschoolers will be graduating from high school. “The new data provide further evidence that the door to a two-degree trajectory is about to close,” said Fatih Birol, the IEA’s chief economist. In fact, he continued, “When I look at this data, the trend is perfectly in line with a temperature increase of about six degrees.” That’s almost 11 degrees Fahrenheit, which would create a planet straight out of science fiction.

So, new data in hand, everyone at the Rio conference renewed their ritual calls for serious international action to move us back to a two-degree trajectory. The charade will continue in November, when the next Conference of the Parties (COP) of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change convenes in Qatar. This will be COP 18 – COP 1 was held in Berlin in 1995, and since then the process has accomplished essentially nothing. Even scientists, who are notoriously reluctant to speak out, are slowly overcoming their natural preference to simply provide data. “The message has been consistent for close to 30 years now,” Collins says with a wry laugh, “and we have the instrumentation and the computer power required to present the evidence in detail. If we choose to continue on our present course of action, it should be done with a full evaluation of the evidence the scientific community has presented.” He pauses, suddenly conscious of being on the record. “I should say, a fuller evaluation of the evidence.”

So far, though, such calls have had little effect. We’re in the same position we’ve been in for a quarter-century: scientific warning followed by political inaction. Among scientists speaking off the record, disgusted candor is the rule. One senior scientist told me, “You know those new cigarette packs, where governments make them put a picture of someone with a hole in their throats? Gas pumps should have something like that.”

The Third Number: 2,795 Gigatons

This number is the scariest of all – one that, for the first time, meshes the political and scientific dimensions of our dilemma. It was highlighted last summer by the Carbon Tracker Initiative, a team of London financial analysts and environmentalists who published a report in an effort to educate investors about the possible risks that climate change poses to their stock portfolios. The number describes the amount of carbon already contained in the proven coal and oil and gas reserves of the fossil-fuel companies, and the countries (think Venezuela or Kuwait) that act like fossil-fuel companies. In short, it’s the fossil fuel we’re currently planning to burn. And the key point is that this new number – 2,795 – is higher than 565. Five times higher.

The Carbon Tracker Initiative – led by James Leaton, an environmentalist who served as an adviser at the accounting giant PricewaterhouseCoopers – combed through proprietary databases to figure out how much oil, gas and coal the world’s major energy companies hold in reserve. The numbers aren’t perfect – they don’t fully reflect the recent surge in unconventional energy sources like shale gas, and they don’t accurately reflect coal reserves, which are subject to less stringent reporting requirements than oil and gas. But for the biggest companies, the figures are quite exact: If you burned everything in the inventories of Russia’s Lukoil and America’s ExxonMobil, for instance, which lead the list of oil and gas companies, each would release more than 40 gigatons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

Which is exactly why this new number, 2,795 gigatons, is such a big deal. Think of two degrees Celsius as the legal drinking limit – equivalent to the 0.08 blood-alcohol level below which you might get away with driving home. The 565 gigatons is how many drinks you could have and still stay below that limit – the six beers, say, you might consume in an evening. And the 2,795 gigatons? That’s the three 12-packs the fossil-fuel industry has on the table, already opened and ready to pour.

We have five times as much oil and coal and gas on the books as climate scientists think is safe to burn. We’d have to keep 80 percent of those reserves locked away underground to avoid that fate. Before we knew those numbers, our fate had been likely. Now, barring some massive intervention, it seems certain.

Yes, this coal and gas and oil is still technically in the soil. But it’s already economically aboveground – it’s figured into share prices, companies are borrowing money against it, nations are basing their budgets on the presumed returns from their patrimony. It explains why the big fossil-fuel companies have fought so hard to prevent the regulation of carbon dioxide – those reserves are their primary asset, the holding that gives their companies their value. It’s why they’ve worked so hard these past years to figure out how to unlock the oil in Canada’s tar sands, or how to drill miles beneath the sea, or how to frack the Appalachians.

If you told Exxon or Lukoil that, in order to avoid wrecking the climate, they couldn’t pump out their reserves, the value of their companies would plummet. John Fullerton, a former managing director at JP Morgan who now runs the Capital Institute, calculates that at today’s market value, those 2,795 gigatons of carbon emissions are worth about $27 trillion. Which is to say, if you paid attention to the scientists and kept 80 percent of it underground, you’d be writing off $20 trillion in assets. The numbers aren’t exact, of course, but that carbon bubble makes the housing bubble look small by comparison. It won’t necessarily burst – we might well burn all that carbon, in which case investors will do fine. But if we do, the planet will crater. You can have a healthy fossil-fuel balance sheet, or a relatively healthy planet – but now that we know the numbers, it looks like you can’t have both. Do the math: 2,795 is five times 565. That’s how the story ends.

So far, as I said at the start, environmental efforts to tackle global warming have failed. The planet’s emissions of carbon dioxide continue to soar, especially as developing countries emulate (and supplant) the industries of the West. Even in rich countries, small reductions in emissions offer no sign of the real break with the status quo we’d need to upend the iron logic of these three numbers. Germany is one of the only big countries that has actually tried hard to change its energy mix; on one sunny Saturday in late May, that northern-latitude nation generated nearly half its power from solar panels within its borders. That’s a small miracle – and it demonstrates that we have the technology to solve our problems. But we lack the will. So far, Germany’s the exception; the rule is ever more carbon.

This record of failure means we know a lot about what strategies don’t work. Green groups, for instance, have spent a lot of time trying to change individual lifestyles: the iconic twisty light bulb has been installed by the millions, but so have a new generation of energy-sucking flatscreen TVs. Most of us are fundamentally ambivalent about going green: We like cheap flights to warm places, and we’re certainly not going to give them up if everyone else is still taking them. Since all of us are in some way the beneficiaries of cheap fossil fuel, tackling climate change has been like trying to build a movement against yourself – it’s as if the gay-rights movement had to be constructed entirely from evangelical preachers, or the abolition movement from slaveholders.

People perceive – correctly – that their individual actions will not make a decisive difference in the atmospheric concentration of CO2; by 2010, a poll found that “while recycling is widespread in America and 73 percent of those polled are paying bills online in order to save paper,” only four percent had reduced their utility use and only three percent had purchased hybrid cars. Given a hundred years, you could conceivably change lifestyles enough to matter – but time is precisely what we lack.

A more efficient method, of course, would be to work through the political system, and environmentalists have tried that, too, with the same limited success. They’ve patiently lobbied leaders, trying to convince them of our peril and assuming that politicians would heed the warnings. Sometimes it has seemed to work. Barack Obama, for instance, campaigned more aggressively about climate change than any president before him – the night he won the nomination, he told supporters that his election would mark the moment “the rise of the oceans began to slow and the planet began to heal.” And he has achieved one significant change: a steady increase in the fuel efficiency mandated for automobiles. It’s the kind of measure, adopted a quarter-century ago, that would have helped enormously. But in light of the numbers I’ve just described, it’s obviously a very small start indeed.

At this point, effective action would require actually keeping most of the carbon the fossil-fuel industry wants to burn safely in the soil, not just changing slightly the speed at which it’s burned. And there the president, apparently haunted by the still-echoing cry of “Drill, baby, drill,” has gone out of his way to frack and mine. His secretary of interior, for instance, opened up a huge swath of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming for coal extraction: The total basin contains some 67.5 gigatons worth of carbon (or more than 10 percent of the available atmospheric space). He’s doing the same thing with Arctic and offshore drilling; in fact, as he explained on the stump in March, “You have my word that we will keep drilling everywhere we can… That’s a commitment that I make.” The next day, in a yard full of oil pipe in Cushing, Oklahoma, the president promised to work on wind and solar energy but, at the same time, to speed up fossil-fuel development: “Producing more oil and gas here at home has been, and will continue to be, a critical part of an all-of-the-above energy strategy.” That is, he’s committed to finding even more stock to add to the 2,795-gigaton inventory of unburned carbon.

Sometimes the irony is almost Borat-scale obvious: In early June, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton traveled on a Norwegian research trawler to see firsthand the growing damage from climate change. “Many of the predictions about warming in the Arctic are being surpassed by the actual data,” she said, describing the sight as “sobering.” But the discussions she traveled to Scandinavia to have with other foreign ministers were mostly about how to make sure Western nations get their share of the estimated $9 trillion in oil (that’s more than 90 billion barrels, or 37 gigatons of carbon) that will become accessible as the Arctic ice melts. Last month, the Obama administration indicated that it would give Shell permission to start drilling in sections of the Arctic.

Almost every government with deposits of hydrocarbons straddles the same divide. Canada, for instance, is a liberal democracy renowned for its internationalism – no wonder, then, that it signed on to the Kyoto treaty, promising to cut its carbon emissions substantially by 2012. But the rising price of oil suddenly made the tar sands of Alberta economically attractive – and since, as NASA climatologist James Hansen pointed out in May, they contain as much as 240 gigatons of carbon (or almost half of the available space if we take the 565 limit seriously), that meant Canada’s commitment to Kyoto was nonsense. In December, the Canadian government withdrew from the treaty before it faced fines for failing to meet its commitments.

The same kind of hypocrisy applies across the ideological board: In his speech to the Copenhagen conference, Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez quoted Rosa Luxemburg, Jean-Jacques Rousseau and “Christ the Redeemer,” insisting that “climate change is undoubtedly the most devastating environmental problem of this century.” But the next spring, in the Simon Bolivar Hall of the state-run oil company, he signed an agreement with a consortium of international players to develop the vast Orinoco tar sands as “the most significant engine for a comprehensive development of the entire territory and Venezuelan population.” The Orinoco deposits are larger than Alberta’s – taken together, they’d fill up the whole available atmospheric space.

So: the paths we have tried to tackle global warming have so far produced only gradual, halting shifts. A rapid, transformative change would require building a movement, and movements require enemies. As John F. Kennedy put it, “The civil rights movement should thank God for Bull Connor. He’s helped it as much as Abraham Lincoln.” And enemies are what climate change has lacked.

But what all these climate numbers make painfully, usefully clear is that the planet does indeed have an enemy – one far more committed to action than governments or individuals. Given this hard math, we need to view the fossil-fuel industry in a new light. It has become a rogue industry, reckless like no other force on Earth. It is Public Enemy Number One to the survival of our planetary civilization. “Lots of companies do rotten things in the course of their business – pay terrible wages, make people work in sweatshops – and we pressure them to change those practices,” says veteran anti-corporate leader Naomi Klein, who is at work on a book about the climate crisis. “But these numbers make clear that with the fossil-fuel industry, wrecking the planet is their business model. It’s what they do.”

According to the Carbon Tracker report, if Exxon burns its current reserves, it would use up more than seven percent of the available atmospheric space between us and the risk of two degrees. BP is just behind, followed by the Russian firm Gazprom, then Chevron, ConocoPhillips and Shell, each of which would fill between three and four percent. Taken together, just these six firms, of the 200 listed in the Carbon Tracker report, would use up more than a quarter of the remaining two-degree budget. Severstal, the Russian mining giant, leads the list of coal companies, followed by firms like BHP Billiton and Peabody. The numbers are simply staggering – this industry, and this industry alone, holds the power to change the physics and chemistry of our planet, and they’re planning to use it.

They’re clearly cognizant of global warming – they employ some of the world’s best scientists, after all, and they’re bidding on all those oil leases made possible by the staggering melt of Arctic ice. And yet they relentlessly search for more hydrocarbons – in early March, Exxon CEO Rex Tillerson told Wall Street analysts that the company plans to spend $37 billion a year through 2016 (about $100 million a day) searching for yet more oil and gas.

There’s not a more reckless man on the planet than Tillerson. Late last month, on the same day the Colorado fires reached their height, he told a New York audience that global warming is real, but dismissed it as an “engineering problem” that has “engineering solutions.” Such as? “Changes to weather patterns that move crop-production areas around – we’ll adapt to that.” This in a week when Kentucky farmers were reporting that corn kernels were “aborting” in record heat, threatening a spike in global food prices. “The fear factor that people want to throw out there to say, ‘We just have to stop this,’ I do not accept,” Tillerson said. Of course not – if he did accept it, he’d have to keep his reserves in the ground. Which would cost him money. It’s not an engineering problem, in other words – it’s a greed problem.

You could argue that this is simply in the nature of these companies – that having found a profitable vein, they’re compelled to keep mining it, more like efficient automatons than people with free will. But as the Supreme Court has made clear, they are people of a sort. In fact, thanks to the size of its bankroll, the fossil-fuel industry has far more free will than the rest of us. These companies don’t simply exist in a world whose hungers they fulfill – they help create the boundaries of that world.

Left to our own devices, citizens might decide to regulate carbon and stop short of the brink; according to a recent poll, nearly two-thirds of Americans would back an international agreement that cut carbon emissions 90 percent by 2050. But we aren’t left to our own devices. The Koch brothers, for instance, have a combined wealth of $50 billion, meaning they trail only Bill Gates on the list of richest Americans. They’ve made most of their money in hydrocarbons, they know any system to regulate carbon would cut those profits, and they reportedly plan to lavish as much as $200 million on this year’s elections. In 2009, for the first time, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce surpassed both the Republican and Democratic National Committees on political spending; the following year, more than 90 percent of the Chamber’s cash went to GOP candidates, many of whom deny the existence of global warming. Not long ago, the Chamber even filed a brief with the EPA urging the agency not to regulate carbon – should the world’s scientists turn out to be right and the planet heats up, the Chamber advised, “populations can acclimatize to warmer climates via a range of behavioral, physiological and technological adaptations.” As radical goes, demanding that we change our physiology seems right up there.

Environmentalists, understandably, have been loath to make the fossil-fuel industry their enemy, respecting its political power and hoping instead to convince these giants that they should turn away from coal, oil and gas and transform themselves more broadly into “energy companies.” Sometimes that strategy appeared to be working – emphasis on appeared. Around the turn of the century, for instance, BP made a brief attempt to restyle itself as “Beyond Petroleum,” adapting a logo that looked like the sun and sticking solar panels on some of its gas stations. But its investments in alternative energy were never more than a tiny fraction of its budget for hydrocarbon exploration, and after a few years, many of those were wound down as new CEOs insisted on returning to the company’s “core business.” In December, BP finally closed its solar division. Shell shut down its solar and wind efforts in 2009. The five biggest oil companies have made more than $1 trillion in profits since the millennium – there’s simply too much money to be made on oil and gas and coal to go chasing after zephyrs and sunbeams.

Much of that profit stems from a single historical accident: Alone among businesses, the fossil-fuel industry is allowed to dump its main waste, carbon dioxide, for free. Nobody else gets that break – if you own a restaurant, you have to pay someone to cart away your trash, since piling it in the street would breed rats. But the fossil-fuel industry is different, and for sound historical reasons: Until a quarter-century ago, almost no one knew that CO2 was dangerous. But now that we understand that carbon is heating the planet and acidifying the oceans, its price becomes the central issue.

If you put a price on carbon, through a direct tax or other methods, it would enlist markets in the fight against global warming. Once Exxon has to pay for the damage its carbon is doing to the atmosphere, the price of its products would rise. Consumers would get a strong signal to use less fossil fuel – every time they stopped at the pump, they’d be reminded that you don’t need a semimilitary vehicle to go to the grocery store. The economic playing field would now be a level one for nonpolluting energy sources. And you could do it all without bankrupting citizens – a so-called “fee-and-dividend” scheme would put a hefty tax on coal and gas and oil, then simply divide up the proceeds, sending everyone in the country a check each month for their share of the added costs of carbon. By switching to cleaner energy sources, most people would actually come out ahead.

There’s only one problem: Putting a price on carbon would reduce the profitability of the fossil-fuel industry. After all, the answer to the question “How high should the price of carbon be?” is “High enough to keep those carbon reserves that would take us past two degrees safely in the ground.” The higher the price on carbon, the more of those reserves would be worthless. The fight, in the end, is about whether the industry will succeed in its fight to keep its special pollution break alive past the point of climate catastrophe, or whether, in the economists’ parlance, we’ll make them internalize those externalities.

It’s not clear, of course, that the power of the fossil-fuel industry can be broken. The U.K. analysts who wrote the Carbon Tracker report and drew attention to these numbers had a relatively modest goal – they simply wanted to remind investors that climate change poses a very real risk to the stock prices of energy companies. Say something so big finally happens (a giant hurricane swamps Manhattan, a megadrought wipes out Midwest agriculture) that even the political power of the industry is inadequate to restrain legislators, who manage to regulate carbon. Suddenly those Chevron reserves would be a lot less valuable, and the stock would tank. Given that risk, the Carbon Tracker report warned investors to lessen their exposure, hedge it with some big plays in alternative energy.

“The regular process of economic evolution is that businesses are left with stranded assets all the time,” says Nick Robins, who runs HSBC’s Climate Change Centre. “Think of film cameras, or typewriters. The question is not whether this will happen. It will. Pension systems have been hit by the dot-com and credit crunch. They’ll be hit by this.” Still, it hasn’t been easy to convince investors, who have shared in the oil industry’s record profits. “The reason you get bubbles,” sighs Leaton, “is that everyone thinks they’re the best analyst – that they’ll go to the edge of the cliff and then jump back when everyone else goes over.”

So pure self-interest probably won’t spark a transformative challenge to fossil fuel. But moral outrage just might – and that’s the real meaning of this new math. It could, plausibly, give rise to a real movement.

Once, in recent corporate history, anger forced an industry to make basic changes. That was the campaign in the 1980s demanding divestment from companies doing business in South Africa. It rose first on college campuses and then spread to municipal and state governments; 155 campuses eventually divested, and by the end of the decade, more than 80 cities, 25 states and 19 counties had taken some form of binding economic action against companies connected to the apartheid regime. “The end of apartheid stands as one of the crowning accomplishments of the past century,” as Archbishop Desmond Tutu put it, “but we would not have succeeded without the help of international pressure,” especially from “the divestment movement of the 1980s.”

The fossil-fuel industry is obviously a tougher opponent, and even if you could force the hand of particular companies, you’d still have to figure out a strategy for dealing with all the sovereign nations that, in effect, act as fossil-fuel companies. But the link for college students is even more obvious in this case. If their college’s endowment portfolio has fossil-fuel stock, then their educations are being subsidized by investments that guarantee they won’t have much of a planet on which to make use of their degree. (The same logic applies to the world’s largest investors, pension funds, which are also theoretically interested in the future – that’s when their members will “enjoy their retirement.”) “Given the severity of the climate crisis, a comparable demand that our institutions dump stock from companies that are destroying the planet would not only be appropriate but effective,” says Bob Massie, a former anti-apartheid activist who helped found the Investor Network on Climate Risk. “The message is simple: We have had enough. We must sever the ties with those who profit from climate change – now.”

Movements rarely have predictable outcomes. But any campaign that weakens the fossil-fuel industry’s political standing clearly increases the chances of retiring its special breaks. Consider President Obama’s signal achievement in the climate fight, the large increase he won in mileage requirements for cars. Scientists, environmentalists and engineers had advocated such policies for decades, but until Detroit came under severe financial pressure, it was politically powerful enough to fend them off. If people come to understand the cold, mathematical truth – that the fossil-fuel industry is systematically undermining the planet’s physical systems – it might weaken it enough to matter politically. Exxon and their ilk might drop their opposition to a fee-and-dividend solution; they might even decide to become true energy companies, this time for real.

Even if such a campaign is possible, however, we may have waited too long to start it. To make a real difference – to keep us under a temperature increase of two degrees – you’d need to change carbon pricing in Washington, and then use that victory to leverage similar shifts around the world. At this point, what happens in the U.S. is most important for how it will influence China and India, where emissions are growing fastest. (In early June, researchers concluded that China has probably under-reported its emissions by up to 20 percent.) The three numbers I’ve described are daunting – they may define an essentially impossible future. But at least they provide intellectual clarity about the greatest challenge humans have ever faced. We know how much we can burn, and we know who’s planning to burn more. Climate change operates on a geological scale and time frame, but it’s not an impersonal force of nature; the more carefully you do the math, the more thoroughly you realize that this is, at bottom, a moral issue; we have met the enemy and they is Shell.

Meanwhile the tide of numbers continues. The week after the Rio conference limped to its conclusion, Arctic sea ice hit the lowest level ever recorded for that date. Last month, on a single weekend, Tropical Storm Debby dumped more than 20 inches of rain on Florida – the earliest the season’s fourth-named cyclone has ever arrived. At the same time, the largest fire in New Mexico history burned on, and the most destructive fire in Colorado’s annals claimed 346 homes in Colorado Springs – breaking a record set the week before in Fort Collins. This month, scientists issued a new study concluding that global warming has dramatically increased the likelihood of severe heat and drought – days after a heat wave across the Plains and Midwest broke records that had stood since the Dust Bowl, threatening this year’s harvest. You want a big number? In the course of this month, a quadrillion kernels of corn need to pollinate across the grain belt, something they can’t do if temperatures remain off the charts. Just like us, our crops are adapted to the Holocene, the 11,000-year period of climatic stability we’re now leaving… in the dust.

This story is from the August 2nd, 2012 issue of Rolling Stone.
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/global-warmings-terrifying-new-math-20120719

Also see http://350.org

Speak Up for Energy Efficiency – AZ Corp Commission open meeting – July 11

at Arizona Corporation Commission Tucson Offices, Room 222
400 W Congress St, Tucson AZ

TEP Customers – Speak Up for Energy Efficiency

Please come to a public comment session and tell the AZ Corporation Commission that you support TEP’s Energy Efficiency Plan

Energy efficiency programs help conserve energy, reduce water use, reduce air pollution, and keep energy costs lower for everyone. They also create jobs in our communities and keep more of our energy dollars in Arizona.

If we don’t invest in energy efficiency, we guarantee ourselves higher energy bills in the future as utilities will build unnecessary infrastructure and buy more fuel from and send jobs out of state.

Arizona Corporation Commission Open Meeting
Wednesday, July 11
10 a.m.
AZ Corporation Commission Tucson Offices
400 W. Congress St., Room 222, Tucson 
(map)

If you cannot attend, please send a message to the commissioners!

Menu for the Future – Discussion Course – Thursdays July 12 thru Aug 16

six Thursdays from July 12 thru August 16
in Central Tucson

Menu for the Future Discussion Course

Thursdays, July 12 to August 16, 2012 – 6:30 to 8:00pm

Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture offers the Northwest Earth Institute’s Menu for the Future Class, a 6-session discussion course that analyzes the connection between food and sustainability.  The goals of the course are to explore food systems and their impact on culture, society, and ecology; to gain insight into agricultural and individual practices that promote personal and ecological well-being; and to consider your role in creating or supporting sustainable food systems.

Topics covered include:

  • What’s Eating America (explores the effects of modern industrial eating habits on culture, society and ecological systems).
  • Anonymous Food (considers the ecological and economic impacts that have accompanied the changes in how we grow and prepare food).
  • Farming for the Future (examines emerging food system alternatives, highlighting sustainable growing practices, the benefits of small farms and urban food production, and how individuals can make choices that lead to a more sustainable food supply).
  • You Are What You Eat (considers the influences that shape our choices and food policies from the fields to Capitol Hill, and the implications for our health and well-being).
  • Toward a Just Food System (explores the role that governments, communities and individuals can play in addressing hunger, equity, and Fair Trade to create a more just food system).
  • Choices for Change (offers inspiration and practical advice in taking steps to create more sustainable food systems).

How it Works:  Prior to each meeting, participants read short selections from the course book relating to one of the topics listed above (book is provided as part of class fee).  Each gathering consists of open conversation regarding the readings.  Dialogue from a wide range of perspectives and learning through self-discovery are encouraged.  While each session is facilitated by one of the course participants, there is no formal teacher.

The Details:

  • Dates/Time: Weekly meetings occur each Thursday, July 12 to August 16, from 6:30 to 8pm.  Participants must attend all sessions.
  • Location: central Tucson.
  • Cost (for course book): $25 BASA members, $30 non-members (or $45 for course and a one-year BASA membership).

Contact Meghan at meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org or 520-331-9821 for further information.
Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture

Sustainable Tucson July Meeting – Urban Mobility and Urban Form – July 9

at Joel D. Valdez Main Downtown Library, 101 N. Stone, (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

The Sustainability of
Urban Mobility and Urban Form

The July ST General Meeting will feature panel presentations and conversation by special Tucson speakers who are addressing in their work “Sustainable mobility and urban form.” This is a very timely topic on many fronts now:

  City of Tucson’s current ten-year update of the General Plan.

  Anticipation of Tucson’s modern streetcar line.

  Tucson’s love affair with walking, jogging, biking, hiking and using transit.

  Community visioning and planning related to the Imagine Greater Tucson Project.

  The emergence of “urban villages” as places where we could live.

  City of Tucson’s current climate change mitigation and adaptation planning.

  Local adaptation to the global credit and energy contraction now taking place.

Gene Caywood, local transportation planner and leading light for Old Pueblo Trolley presents Tucson mobility: past, present, and future.

Ian Johnson, co-leader of the Living Streets Alliance discusses ways we can all help to create, maintain, and enjoy the culture of “living streets” combining sidewalks, bike paths, and transit where people meet and move.

Steve Farley, Arizona State legislator and public artist talks about the benefits of sustainable transportation and advocacy.

Ann Chaneka,  Pima Association of Governments bicycle planner and recently returning from the international Velo conference in Vancouver presents sustainable urban transportation and bicycle planning.

Tres English, ST Core Team member, talks about “21st Century Tucson – a Network of Urban Villages – More convenient, More accessible, More affordable – NOT More mobile.”

We believe that building a sustainable future will take the cooperation and partnering of residents, businesses, government, institutions and organizations. It is in this spirit that we are reaching out to our members, interested people, and community leaders, bringing them together to focus the wider public on these critical sustainability discussions. Our ultimate intent is to build partnerships and work together toward our common goals.

Join us for another lively Sustainable Tucson General meeting!

Doors open at 5:30 pm.
The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

Also read James Howard Kunstler’s Making Other Arrangements

Rainwater Harvesting – Native Seeds/SEARCH free monthly salon – July 16

Free, at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N. Campbell Ave. (just south of Ft. Lowell)

Rainwater Harvesting

Leona Davis, Education and Advocacy Coordinator
Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona

Harvest those wonderful monsoon rains. Learn about the benefits of rainwater harvesting both in the soil and in storage tanks. Gain an understanding of the cost, system sizing, and materials involved in a variety of home rainwater harvesting systems.

Occupy Arcology – ecological city design lecture & discussion – June 26

Free, at Historic Y conference room, 738 North 5th Ave (at University)

 

OCCUPY ARCOLOGY LECTURE – June 26

Come be a part of a lecture and lively discussion on Occupy Arcology. In this part of the lecture series, hosted by Occupy Tucson’s Doctress Neutopia, we will focus on the question of ecology and economy within the context of an arcology (ecological city design). Any knowledge you have about alternative economics—alternative currencies, time banks, labor relationships, the rights of nature, etc, are welcome in our discussion. So, please come and share your wisdom and knowledge.

Some of the questions to be raised in the discussion are:

What kind of economy fosters health and sustainability with our natural resources?
How do we move into a no-growth, zero-carbon city?
How would William McDonough’s “cradle-to-cradle industrials” move us beyond 20th Century industrials that are polluting our world?
What kind of labor-force is needed to construct an evolutionary city design?
Do we need a new definition of work?
What would a feminist economy, outlined in Riane Eisler’s book The Real Wealth of Nations, look like?
How do we convert military monies into building solar-powered arcologies so that a peace time economy can lead us into a beautiful future?

When: Tuesday June 26th, 2012
Time: 5:00 – 6:30 P.M.
Place: Historic Y’s conference room, 738 North 5th Ave (at University)

For More Info: Contact doctress(at)lovolution.net

Also see http://www.lovolution.net/MainPages/arcology/arcology.htm

GMO-Free “Meet & Eat” – June 21

at Khalsa Montessori School, 3701 River Road, Tucson

 

Start the Summer GMO-Free “Meet & Eat”
www.gmofreeprojectoftucson.org

A little bit meet up, a little bit happy hour, a little bit of learning new information, and a little bit of new and old volunteers getting to know each other and discussing exciting things that are coming up.

We had numerous people say they want to get involved in our group this summer, and we figured why not start this sweltering season with a hot update on the latest information in the GMO-free world, a cool breather with good food, and a rundown of some exciting events we know are coming and other events we would like to schedule with your help in a centrally located, easy-to-get-to venue?

Our Director of Education, Melissa Diane Smith – a nationally known investigative health journalist and nutritionist – will share information she recently learned in interviews she did with some top experts on GMOs.

We’ll also be supplying a wide variety of non-GMO chips that you can enjoy with dip, and organic guacamole. If anyone wants to bring salsa or another non-GMO dip, or veggie sticks for some more variety, please do.

We’ll also be running down the latest on our restaurant program; telling you about a new exciting movie on GMOs that’s coming soon and two sustainable food events later this year that are scheduled to have GMO-free food vendors if we can get enough restaurants on board; and getting the input, ideas, and connections you have to help further the GMO-free cause.

Thursday, June 21st, 2012 – 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Khalsa Montessori School
3701 River Road, Tucson

If you have any questions, email info(at)gmofreeprojectoftucson.org

Bisbee Solar Cookoff – June 2

Free, at Bisbee Farmers Market (in Vista Park in the Warren District)

 

Bisbee Solar Cookoff
June 2, 2012 – 10am to 1pm

Join Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture and the Bisbee Farmers Market for their annual Solar Cookoff.  Activities will include solar cooking demonstrations as well as solar ovens and accessories for sale.

At 11am, join local experts for a Solar Cooking Basics class.  At noon, learn how to build your own solar oven with a cardboard box and aluminum foil.

Feel free to bring a solar oven and join in the competition. A potluck and voting will follow the event for those who prepare solar food.

Location: Bisbee Farmers Market (in Vista Park in the Warren District)
Cost: Free

For more info, visit www.bajaaz.org/calendar

Questions?  Contact Meghan at meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org or 520-331-9821, Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture

A pre-monsoon storm of water harvesting activity – Free workshops May 14 thru 26

Watershed Management Group’s Sweat Equity Co-op is ending its 2012 pre monsoon season with a storm of rain water implementation workshops that are free and open to the public. Snacks and liquid refreshments are always provided.

Come on out and learn how to get the most out of your home’s natural resources, and find out how WMG’s Co-op is working to make sustainable home retrofits accessible, affordable, and enjoyable for all its participants.

Scheduled so far are,

Rain barrel building workshop – May 14, Monday 8 am – 1 pm

Bushmann tank installation – May 19, Saturday 8 am – 1 pm

Bushmann tank installation – May 20, Sunday 7 am – 12 pm

Bushmann tank installation – May 22, Tuesday 7 am – 12 pm

Earthworks Workshop – May 24, Thursday 7 am – 12 pm

Earthworks Workshop – May 25, Friday 7 am – 12 pm

Driveway Rip Workshop – May 26, Saturday 7 am – 12 pm

Please see our events calendar for more details – watershedmg.org/calendar-tucson
For more information about the Co-op program, visit our website here – watershedmg.org/co-op

Watershed Management Groupwww.watershedmg.org

Soil is Life – Restoring the Soil Food Web – lecture and local foods potluck – May 31

at Saint Marks Church, Third and Alvernon, Tucson

 

Soil is Life – Restoring the Soil Food Web
A Lecture and Local Foods Potluck

Join Watershed Management Group’s Tucson Co-op to celebrate the end of our busiest season to date and to revel in anticipation of the coming monsoons, with our semi annual local foods potluck and lecture.

This event will be held in conjunction with our newest Soil Stewards program and we are excited that Dr. Mitchell Pavao-Zuckerman (of the University of Arizona’s Biosphere 2) will lead an interactive session on the soil food web after the potluck.

Dr Paveo-Zuckerman will discuss its importance for food production, plant growth, and soil water storage. We will examine techniques to enhance soil ecology in the arid urban environment, and help participants develop plans to boost the soil web in their own home landscape.

To find out more and sign up to this free event go to our Tucson Co-op website http://watershedmg.org/co-op/tucson

Date Thursday, May 31
Time: 6:00 p.m. — 8:00 p.m.
Location: Saint Marks Church, Third and Alvernon

Summer Hours at the Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market

Thursdays 4-7 PM, all Summer, at 100 S Avenida del Convento, west of I-10, near the intersection of Congress and Grande

Summer hours begin at the Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market on Thursday, May 3rd. Summer hours are Thursdays, 4-7 PM.

The Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market is located at 100 S. Avenida del Convento, West of I-10, near the intersection of Congress and Grande.

For more info, call Marie at 520-882-3313

Sustainable Tucson May Meeting – Prosperity Without Growth – May 14

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Downtown (free lower level parking off Alameda Street)

Prosperity Without Growth – What does it look like?

Please join us at Sustainable Tucson’s May meeting to hear local experts talk about Sustainable Economics, and share your thoughts about what this looks like and what it entails. Help us engage the planners with solutions appropriate to our time.

Planning efforts in Tucson (including Imagine Greater Tucson) assume growth to be inevitable and good.

Until recently, there was no reason to question that belief. With a seemingly endless supply of resources and space to dump waste products, there was no feedback raising our awareness, nor reason to ask questions.

Now, however, the pinch has begun. The high carbon energy fuels upon which we have built our modern civilization are not only becoming more problematic to supply, but the effects of their combustion are destabilizing the climate, decimating biodiversity, disrupting food security and beginning to affect social cohesion. The problem is the result of the collective impact of our human species. Our numbers have increased to the point where our resource consumption and related waste is beyond the planetary ecosystem’s ability to continue to supply and absorb them.

If the planet were our house, the debt we have accumulated is coming due, foreclosure is on the horizon, and we may soon lose our home.

Ecological economist Herman Daly notes that growth can become “uneconomic” when the “bads” accumulate faster than the “goods”, the “illth” faster than the wealth (see video, link below).

What are the alternatives to Growth?
What positive vision can lead us away from the “inevitable”?

Doors open at 5:30 pm.
The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

Also see these videos,

Herman DalyUneconomic Growth
Charles EisensteinSacred Economics
Tim JacksonProsperity without Growth
Rushey Green Time Bank

National Electric Drag Racing Association EVent – Tucson April 14

at Southwest International Raceway in Tucson

Bookmans 1st Annual Spring Thaw – a NEDRA EVent

Bookmans is hosting the 1st Annual Spring Thaw – a National Electric Drag Racing Association (NEDRA) EVent at the Southwest International Raceway on Saturday, 14 April 2012.

Also, done in conjunction with the Green Pavilion, displaying a number of Plug-ins, be it pure Electrics or Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs).

Contact: EVJerry Asher, email EVisionA2Z(at)usa.net
Acting PR Chair, Tucson Electric Vehicle Association
www.TEVA2.com

Dad’s Farm Tour – Huachuca City – May 6

May 6 from 10am to 3pm – Free!
at 30 W. Ivey Road in Huachuca City, just one mile north of Mustang Corners on Hwy 90

Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture, the Sierra Vista Farmers’ Market, and Dad’s Farm sponsor the opportunity to spend a day on a working farm.

Learn viable food production methods for the Sierra Vista area, get gardening tips from an experienced farmer, observe spring/summer crops or the fruit & nut orchard, or learn about mulching and watering systems!

The tour will also include a sustainable agriculture fair with informational booths and local farmers, ranchers, and value-added producers.

For the kids there is a petting zoo, a horse-drawn wagon, and opportunities to experiment with planting seeds.

For further info, visit www.bajaaz.org/calendar or contact Meghan at meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org or 520-331-9821

UA Earth Day 2012 – University of Arizona – April 20

at Main Gate Square on University Boulevard

 

UA Earth Day 2012

Come celebrate UA Earth Day on Friday, April 20th from 4-7:30 p.m. at Main Gate Square on University Boulevard.

The event will feature live entertainment, activities for kids and families, and interactive demonstrations. As many as 60 UA programs and local businesses and organizations will be on hand to inform and engage the Tucson community about their work to make our region and world more sustainable — come and learn how you can participate!

Hosted by UA students, the UA Office of Sustainability, and Main Gate Square, with promotional support from Mrs. Green and the Southern Arizona Green Chamber of Commerce.

Ride your bike and valet for free, or get a parking validation for the nearby Tyndall garage when you patronize a Main Gate business.

How do you move through the city? – Worker Transit Authority

Free – April 27 & 28, May 4 & 5, May 11 & 12 – 5 pm to 8 pm
 
210 East Broadway, Downtown Tucson Arizona

The Worker Transit Authority asks the community

“How do you move through the city?”

A Convergence of Art and Planning

For three weekends in a series of free public events, Tucson residents can participate in this important discussion about land use, infrastructure, transportation, environment and distribution.

Like actual transit authority public process, this project is a form of civic engagement, but unlike actual transit authority pubic process the WTA events are fun!

The project wraps art, parody, and beauty to format new and radical notions of how we can function as individuals and as a society, including an overview of the Worker Transit Authority (WTA), the Consumer Transit System (CTS) & the Bicycle-centric Approach to Planning (BcAP).

The exhibits include interactive maps, brochures, surveys, drawings, sculptures, videos and text.

 

Bill Mackey of Worker, Inc. will present events that incorporate performance, graphics, and data in a participatory manner designed to facilitate discussion among the community.

Collaborators include Jeffrey Buesing, Ben Olmstead, Peter Wilke, Tyler Jorgenson, Dwight Metzger, Cook Signs, Ron and Patricia Schwabe, and the Apparatchiks.

For further information, visit www.workertransitauthority.com from your PC or mobile device and get involved. Feel free to ‘take the survey’ on our homepage.

Funded through the Tucson Pima Arts Council / Kresge Arts in Tucson ll: P.L.A.C.E. Initiative Grants. In kind support from Reproductions Inc., Peach Properties, Organic Kitchen & Zocalo Magazine. Letters of support from City of Tucson Department of Transit, City of Tucson Ward I and VI, Living Streets Alliance, Downtown Partnership, Drachman Institute, Department of Geography University of Arizona, College of Architecture University of Arizona, City of Tucson Office of Conservation & Sustainable Development.

 

Worker Inc. is a company that specializes in exploring the human connections to the built environment, bridging the theory and practice of architecture, the social sciences, planning and art. Since 2009, Worker Inc. has been instrumental in the production of community exhibits – Downtown Tucson Master Plans, Food Paper Alcohol, and You Are Here. The exhibits combine ART + PLANNING, creating a unique platform that is an act of discovery for the community. Visit www.workerincorporated.com for more information about Bill Mackey and Worker, Inc.

Bill Mackey 520.664.4847 workerarchitect(at)yahoo.com

Solar Potluck And Exhibition – April 28

at Catalina State Park, 11570 N Oracle Road

 

Solar Potluck And Exhibition

Citizens for Solar invites you to our 30th Annual Solar Potluck And Exhibition. Saturday, April 28, 2012 at Catalina State Park 11570 N. Oracle Road, 10 am til Sunset.

Solar cooker food, solar displays, speakers, and solar powered musicians.

Dinner at 5pm – bring a dish, drink, ice, plate, and silver if you can.

Free with $7 park entrance fee.

Visit us at www.citizensforsolar.org

Green Fest: A Celebration of Green Living – Tucson Village Farm – April 7

Bookmans, Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona and Tucson Village Farm Gear Up for Green Fest: A Celebration of Green Living

GREENFEST 2012

Date: Saturday, April 7, 2012
Time: 10:00am – 3:00pm
Location: Tucson Village Farm, 4210 N. Campbell Ave (Across from Trader Joe’s at Campbell and River)
Cost: FREE

Are you interested in “greening” your life? Well Tucson, get ready for a full day of interactive learning and green fun! Bookmans in partnership with the Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona host the third annual GreenFest on April 7 at Tucson Village Farms. This free event features kids activities and green vendors and shows how easy it is to embark upon an eco-friendly lifestyle. To further encourage sustainable and healthful living, reusable water bottles will be given to the first 250 attendees and $5 Bookmans coupons will be handed out to all who ride their bike to the event.

From its inception GreenFest has been dedicated to educating and inspiring the community – children and adults, individuals and families, urban and rural – to build better and greener communities. Tucson provides the perfect stage for such efforts as it already has a plethora of bike paths, smart water usage, farmer’s markets and clean air. Girls Scouts Chief Operating Officer Kristen Culliney notes, “Our goal is to truly engage the community, show them all the amazing things happening locally, and create opportunities to green their lives. Every year the variety of topics at GreenFest expands as does the number of participants. The result is a true collaborative effort where we have something for just about everyone! We cannot wait and hope you join us.”

Festivities to take place at GreenFest include gardening tips from Tucson Organic Gardeners, compost details from Fairfax Companies, tomato starts from Aravaipa Heirlooms and solar frozen ice cream from Isabella’s Ice Cream who will be driving to the event using electric power. Arizona Feeds County Store, Mrs. Green’s World, Tucson Village Farms, the Community Food Bank, GeoInnovation, Habitat for Humanity, Heifer International, Renee’s Organic Oven, Tucson Macaroni Kid, A Slice of Heaven, Prickly Pops, Technicians for Sustainability, Tucson Clean and Beautiful and the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension will be on hand with their products and to answer your questions.

Come to GreenFest, enjoy the fresh springtime air and see how small changes can make a big impact when done together.

For more information visit: http://bookmans.com/content/greenfest-2012 or look us up on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/GreenFestTucson

About Girl Scouts
Girl Scouts is the world’s preeminent leadership development organization dedicated to helping build girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. GSSoAz serves over 14,000 girls in Southern Arizona and includes over 1,500 adult volunteers. For more information on Girl Scouting in Southern Arizona, please contact Maria DeCabooter, Advocacy Specialist, 520.319.3175, mdecabooter(at)girlscoutssoaz.org

Menu for the Future discussion course – Thursdays starting May 3

Six Thursdays, May 3 to June 7, in Tucson AZ

 

Menu for the Future

Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture offers Menu for the Future, a 6-session discussion course prepared by the Northwest Earth Institute that analyzes the connection between food and sustainability.

The goals of the course are to explore food systems and their impact on culture, society, and ecology; to gain insight into agricultural and individual practices that promote personal and ecological well-being; and to consider your role in creating or supporting sustainable food systems.

Topics covered include:

  • What’s Eating America (explores the effects of modern industrial eating habits on culture, society and ecological systems).
  • Anonymous Food (considers the ecological and economic impacts that have accompanied the changes in how we grow and prepare food).
  • Farming for the Future (examines emerging food system alternatives, highlighting sustainable growing practices, the benefits of small farms and urban food production, and how individuals can make choices that lead to a more sustainable food supply).
  • You Are What You Eat (considers the influences that shape our choices and food policies from the fields to Capitol Hill, and the implications for our health and well-being).
  • Toward a Just Food System (explores the role that governments, communities and individuals can play in addressing hunger, equity, and Fair Trade to create a more just food system).
  • Choices for Change (offers inspiration and practical advice in taking steps to create more sustainable food systems).

How it Works:

Prior to each meeting, participants read short selections from the course book relating to one of the topics listed above (book is provided as part of class fee). Each gathering consists of open conversation regarding the readings. Dialogue from a wide range of perspectives and learning through self-discovery are encouraged. While each session is facilitated by one of the course participants, there is no formal teacher.

The Details:

  • Dates/Time: Weekly meetings occur each Thursday, May 3 to June 7, from 6:30 to 8pm. Participants must attend all sessions.
  • Location: central Tucson.
  • Cost (for course book): $25 BASA members, $30 non-members (or $45 for course and a one-year BASA membership).
  • Advance registration is required.

Contact Meghan at meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org or 520-331-9821 for additional information or to register.

Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture – www.bajaaz.org

Cholla Bud and Nopalito Harvesting Workshop – Flor de Mayo – April 26

Location – West Side Tucson, near W Ironwood Hill Dr & Camino de Oeste

 

Cholla Bud and Nopalito Harvesting Workshop

Join Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture and Flor de Mayo to learn how to harvest, process, and cook with cholla buds and nopalitos, both traditional foods of the native peoples of the Sonoran desert.

Cholla buds are a superfood with high available calcium and complex carbohydrates that help balance blood sugar levels and provide sustained energy. Nopalitos (prickly pear pads) are high in vitamin A, vitamin C, and calcium, and also help balance blood sugar levels (great for diabetics!).

Taught by Martha Burgess, ethnobotanist and herbalist.

Cost: $35 for BASA members, $40 for non-members (or $55 for the workshop and a one-year BASA membership). Advance registration required.

Contact Meghan at meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org or 520-331-9821 for further information or to register.

Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture – www.bajaaz.org

Introduction to Sprouting – Wanda Poindexter – April 18

at The Tasteful Kitchen, 722 North Stone Avenue (south of University Avenue and just north of Economy Restaurant Supply)

Join Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture and Wanda Poindexter to learn…

Sprouting: The Art of Gardening in a Jar

Taste various types of sprouts, learn how economical it is to grow organic sprouts right in your own kitchen, and leave with all the materials you need to get started (please bring two clean 16-32 ounce glass jars).  Taught by Wanda Poindexter, who has been sprouting for many years.

Time: 6:00 to 7:00pm (please arrive by 5:45pm)

Cost: $5 for BASA members, $10 for non-members (or $25 for the class and a one-year BASA membership). Advance registration required.

Contact Meghan at meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org or 520-331-9821 for further information or to register.

Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture – www.bajaaz.org

Melissa Diane Smith – GMO Free Project of Tucson – Native Seeds/SEARCH Salon – May 21

at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N Campbell Ave, Tucson

 

Native Seeds/SEARCH – Free Monthly Salon – A little something for anyone who has ever wielded a fork or pitchfork. Bring your juiciest ideas and appetite for mind-watering conversations.

May 21 Monday 5:30 to 7:30 pm

Melissa Diane Smith, nutritionist, author and Director of Education for the GMO Free Project of Tucson, will discuss what we can do to assure our food supply is GMO free. She will also show a short film, “Hidden Dangers in Kids’ Meals.”

www.nativeseeds.org

Desert Terroir with Gary Paul Nabhan – Native Seeds/SEARCH Monthly Salon – April 16

at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N Campbell Ave, Tucson

 

Native Seeds/SEARCH – Free Monthly Salon – A little something for anyone who has ever wielded a fork or pitchfork. Bring your juiciest ideas and appetite for mind-watering conversations.

April 16 Monday 5:30 to 7:30 pm

Gary Paul Nabhan, one of the founders of Native Seeds/SEARCH, will discuss his new book Desert Terroir, Exploring the Unique Flavors and Sundry Places of the Borderlands. Gary is an internationally-celebrated nature writer, seed saver, conservation biologist, and sustainable agriculture activist who has been called “the father of the local food movement” by Mother Earth News.

www.nativeseeds.org

Revenge of the Electric Car – Pima County Public Library – free showings in March

Now Showing at Your Library! – Revenge of the Electric Car

Pima County Public Library – free showings around Tucson in March…

Here’s your chance to watch and discuss the film Revenge of the Electric Car at a Community Cinema screening event.

Director Chris Paine on Revenge of the Electric Car: “Sometimes change, like a train in the old West, gets stopped dead in its tracks. That was the story of Who Killed the Electric Car? The villains were the same guys who always hold things up when real progress is in the air. Pistol-waving business lobbyists fighting for their old monopolies, simpleton leaders defending the status quo, and the tendency for most of us to stay in our seats rather then board new trains.”

Filmmaker Chris Paine takes his film crew behind the closed doors of Nissan, GM, and the Silicon Valley start-up Tesla Motors to chronicle the story of the global resurgence of electric cars. Without using a single drop of foreign oil, this new generation of car is America’s future: fast, furious, and cleaner than ever.

Following each screening, there will be an opportunity to explore the social issues raised in the films through facilitated discussions or special guest speakers.

Door prizes will be given to the first 5 people attending the screening.

Saturday, March 17, 2012
1:30pm – 3:00pm
Woods Memorial Branch Library

Saturday, March 17, 2012
3:30pm – 5:00pm
Miller-Golf Links Branch Library

Monday, March 19, 2012
4:00pm – 6:00pm
Mission Branch Library

Friday, March 23, 2012
2:00pm – 4:00pm
Joyner-Green Valley Branch Library

This event is a collaborative effort between Independent Television Service Community Cinema, PBS Independent Lens, Arizona Public Media, and Pima County Public Library’s Now Showing at Your Library documentary film series.

Urban Agriculture – How to Grow your own vegetables – March 21

Ward 3 Neighbors Alliance, Woods Library
March 21, 2012, 6 – 8 pm

Urban Agriculture: How to Grow your own vegetables

Presenters:

Native Seed Search
Tucson Organic Gardeners
Community Gardens
UA Pima County Extension Office
Arbico Organics
Growers House
Pima County Food Systems Alliance

We will have gardening door prizes, free Hyacinth Bean Vine Seeds and much more.  Get your garden ready for spring and grow your own organic food.

Snacks and beverages will be provided.

A Sweet Grass Braid of Connection – March 29

at City of Tucson Northwest Community Center, 2160 N 6th Avenue, Tucson AZ 85705

A Sweet Grass Braid of Connection” Gathering
March 29, 2012 from 6 to 8:30 p.m.

Gathering, Facilitator for Class, Martha Dominguez

It has been my observation in meeting people that community is something needed to have a sense of belonging and connection that is important to the human heart and soul.

As I come from community since my ancestral time being of Maya-Lenca culture I would like to invite you to attend a community seeding of ideas and to have a discussion about how to join efforts as our Mother Earth grows her family and to learn how community can develop. Let’s build a human network to stop individual conceptual ideas and become part of the whole. In communities of my life experience there is always a space for self because we each need space to just be and to center our spirit. For this gathering we will practice different aspects of community it will be interactive. The start will open sharing ideas then we will act to practice being in a community in our neighborhood in the city or else where.

Join us for this gathering of connection and exchange on Thursday March 29, 2012 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Alternative economic price for attending is $10 per person, contact Martha at: marthacd(at)earthlink.net or call 520-822-9302 to confirm your participation, payment can be mailed to Martha Dominguez, 13555 West Sacred Earth Place, Tucson, AZ 85735. Gathering is in limited space to no more than 25 participants so we love to have you with us.

Seed Exchange at Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market – March 8

The Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market is located at  100 S. Avenida Del Convento, near the intersection of Congress and Grande.

On March 8th from 3 to 6pm, the Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market will be hosting a spring gardening celebration where everyone can participate in a seed exchange, and purchase vegetable seedlings, shade cloth, and bird netting.

As spring quickly approaches, local vegetable gardeners are preparing their soil, seeds, and pest control, and they can look to the Community Food Bank for help with all of these arrangements.

Community Food Bank gardening staff will also be available to share their expertise about organic desert gardening, free gardening programs, and workshops.

For more information please phone 882-3304. Also see our website at http://communityfoodbank.org

Nine Elements of a Sustainable Culture – Mitchell Thomashow – free lecture at UA – Feb 29

WHEN: Wednesday, Feb. 29, 5 to 7 pm
WHERE: Center for Creative Photography Auditorium, University of Arizona (near Speedway and Park)
ADMISSION: Free

At its core, sustainability addresses
how people live, think and behave.
We are all change agents.
– Mitchell Thomashow

Meet Mitchell Thomashow and hear how he transformed Unity College into a nationally recognized institution for its focus on sustainability and the environment. He sees every college campus as a potential laboratory of sustainability – and you can too. Learn about his Nine Elements of a Sustainable Culture and how to integrate them here to change our future.

Author, educator, environmentalist & philosopher, Mitchell Thomashow integrates the sciences with philosophy. President Emeritus of Unity College, his latest book “The Nine Elements of Sustainability” will be published by MIT Press.

Supported by the University of Arizona Office of Sustainability, Students for Sustainability, Institute of the Environment, EcoOps and UA Green Fund

For more information: Joe Abraham, 621-2711 or jabraham(at)email.arizona.edu

Clean Elections – and other projects – To Stop Climate Change – Feb 22

CLEAN ELECTIONS – AND OTHER PROJECTS – TO STOP CLIMATE CHANGE — Wed, Feb 22, 7 PM, 931 N. 5TH AVE.

Dear Climate Change Activist,

Please join us Wednesday, February 22nd at 7 p.m. at the Quaker Meetinghouse, 931 N.5th Ave., Tucson, to learn more about the Clean Elections Law and ways to use it to stop climate change.

Also learn about our new Action Groups to stop coal burning at TEP’s Irvington plant; the Citizens’ Climate Lobby national carbon fee (tax) and dividend campaign; strengthening Tucson’s new climate change plan; 350.org’s bird-dogging, probably of Congressional District 8 candidates who take fossil fuel money, other election projects, our Neighborhood Sustainability and Climate Change Houseparties, and other ways to use listening and peer support in this fight.

Jim Driscoll and Vince Pawlowski

P.S. Please RSVP to Jim at the National Institute for Peer Support

Jim Driscoll
National Institute for Peer Support (NIPS)
4151 E. Boulder Springs Way
Tucson, AZ 85712
Phone: 520-250-0509
Email: JimDriscoll(at)NIPSPeerSupport.org
Website: www.NIPSPeerSupport.org

Walking Away from Empire – Guy McPherson at Antigone Books – March 2

Walking Away from Empire – Guy McPherson at Antigone Books, 411 N. 4th Avenue, Friday, March 2, 7 PM

Guy McPherson will discuss his book, Walking Away from Empire: A Personal Journey.

McPherson was a successful professor by every imperial measure: tenured, published in all the right places, mentoring students who acquired the best jobs in the field. He earned enough to live on a third of his income and still travel as much as he desired throughout the industrialized world. In other words, McPherson was the perfect model of all that is wrong with the United States!

Rather than questioning the system, he was raising minor questions within the system. During the decade of his forties, he awakened to the costs of the nonnegotiable American way of life: obedience at home and oppression abroad. McPherson transformed his life from mainstream ecologist to friend of the earth and social critic.

The reading will be followed by a question and answer period.
Refreshments will be served.

Solar Grant Applications Open Until March 21 – Technicians for Sustainability

TFS’s 2012 Solar Grant – Applications Open from now Until March 21

Technicians for Sustainability (TFS) is proud to announce the opening of our 2012 Solar Grant application process. Starting immediately we will be accepting applications until March 21st, the Spring Equinox.

The TFS grant program is funded by 1% of our revenue to help non-profit groups install renewable energy systems. This program includes both matching grants as well as full grants. The matching grant calculates the retail cost of the system, subtracts the utility rebate, and then TFS pays for 50% of the remaining amount. The full grant calculates the retail cost of the system, subtracts the utility rebate, and then TFS pays for 100% of the remaining amount.

The grant is open to nonprofits in Tucson, AZ who qualify as 501(c)(3) and who share our values of sustainability. You can find more information about the solar grant itself, past grant recipients and the application materials on our website: www.tfssolar.com/about-us/community-involvement/. If there are any questions, please contact our community outreach coordinator, Tiernay Marsh at 520-740-0736 or tiernay(at)tfssolar.com.

About Technicians For Sustainability

Technicians For Sustainability (TFS) is a locally owned, mission-driven business, committed to walking their talk. They provide businesses, public institutions, and residential homeowners with high quality, clean, renewable energy systems, helping to translate environmental values into practical reality. The company employs proven technologies to meet customers’ specific needs, including solar electricity, solar hot water heating, and water harvesting. TFS has installed over a megawatt of solar power in southern Arizona. For more information about Technicians For Sustainability visit www.tfssolar.com