Climate: The Crisis and the Movement

Climate: The Crisis and the Movement

by Naomi Klein & Allen White

Wherein lie the roots of the climate crisis? Allen White, Senior Fellow at the Tellus Institute, talks with writer and activist Naomi Klein, author of the new book This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs the Climate, about how our economic system has driven us to the point of crisis and how we can build a movement to confront the root causes of contemporary planetary perils.

A major theme of your new book is that resistance to the economic transformation required to confront climate change is the paramount challenge facing both the planet and the activist community. Why is that?

According to the analysis of the Carbon Tracker Initiative, between now and 2050, we need to leave at least two-thirds of proven fossil fuel reserves in the ground in order to keep global warming below the widely accepted threshold of two degrees Celsius. If this occurs, owners of these reserves will have to sacrifice trillions of dollars in profits. The fossil fuel companies and their investors, who are counting on these profits, have a huge vested interest in blocking meaningful climate action and, as we have seen so far, the power to do so.

The attraction of profit in the short-term overwhelms longer-term considerations, even for the most “enlightened” of businesspeople. Look at Michael Bloomberg for example. He is often seen as among the most enlightened billionaires on climate change. He introduced climate policies when he was mayor of New York City, he has talked openly about the risks to business associated with climate change, and he backed the Risky Business report that outlined the huge economic impacts of inaction on climate change. But then, as an individual investor, Bloomberg invests substantial money in fossil fuels. Indeed, the investment firm created to manage his wealth specializes in oil and gas.

Is this dynamic unique to the issue of climate change?

We can see this economic roadblock in past social movements as well. In the struggles for women’s liberation, for lesbian and gay liberation, and for racial equality, the biggest wins were on the legal, electoral, and cultural fronts: improved representation in culture and the media, equal rights to vote, and equality under the law. Each of these movements also had a dimension focused on economic transformation, but what you see is a pattern of winning on the legal side, on the electoral side, and on the cultural side, but losing on the economic side because it presents the biggest threat to the status quo.

This pattern goes back to reparations for slavery—the great broken promise of abolition. As Martin Luther King, Jr., said many years later, the civil rights won so far were the rights that came cheaply. It is cheaper to desegregate a lunch counter than it is to bring good schools and good jobs to impoverished neighborhoods. We can see this dynamic in the women’s movement as well. The battles for wages for housework and for counting domestic work as part of the economy are the ones we tend to lose. In the United States, even maternity leave is a struggle. What these all have in common is a diminished bottom line for the economically powerful.

This pattern became clear to me when I traveled to South Africa while writing The Shock Doctrine. One chapter in the book explores the economic losses in the aftermath of the end of apartheid. I saw this as an example of the shock doctrine—the shock of liberation—because it created a major disruption for people’s lives and marked a moment for a small group of South Africans to consolidate wealth. The economic side of the liberation project, which was to nationalize the mines and banks in order to have the resources to invest massively in improving conditions in the townships, was essentially abandoned by the African National Congress once it took power. It is a tragic story because economic inequality is deeper in the post-apartheid era than it was before, despite the enormous gains in democracy and equality under the law.

In discussing these economic roadblocks in your book, you identify neoliberal economics and an extractivist mindset as the root causes of the crisis. How do you define these?

If we are talking about root causes, I would certainly point to extractivism, a violent relationship to the planet based on dominance. It is a mentality that says we can take and keep taking without limit and never give back, one that inevitably obstructs natural cycles of renewal.

The spread of this mindset goes back to the era of European imperialism, with its sacrifice zones of resource extraction that fed the powerful centers of commerce. And it was taken to a completely new, hegemonic level with the rise of coal and the Industrial Revolution. Our drive to mine and drill and now to frack, creating ever more sacrifice zones and disposable communities along the way, certainly goes much deeper and farther back than the neoliberal form of capitalism we have now.

I wouldn’t say that free-market ideology is a root cause of the crisis, but it has played an absolutely crucial role in bringing us to the edge of the climate cliff. With global warming, we have seen an epic and tragic case of bad timing: the moment when the crisis was dropped in our laps was precisely the moment when the neoliberal project had declared victory, that there was no alternative to its program of deregulation, privatization, and slashing the public sector. Politics was now exclusively about unleashing the power of unfettered markets and unrestricted private wealth, and the very notion of collective action to further the public good had fallen completely out of favor. It is the single biggest reason we have seen such little progress on climate, because the obvious solutions—cracking down on corporations, planning our economies—are seen as impossible by the political class.

We frequently hear terms like “sustainable capitalism, “green capitalism,” “breakthrough capitalism,” and “Gaia capitalism.” Are these worthy alternatives to capitalism as we know it or decorations on a fundamentally flawed system?

People put forward these dreams periodically, and some can make sense on paper. But, once again, the entrenched interests and hyper-profitability of the current system block any possibility of the necessary economic transformation. Whenever I encounter these concepts, I always wonder how their proponents plan to get from our current system to these supposedly enlightened systems with their “triple bottom line,” their correct price signals, and their valuing of nature. What is the theory of change? We have been hearing about ways to transform capitalism from the inside for a long time, yet the ecological degradation and economic inequality produced by capitalism have only gotten more brutal.

I can certainly imagine an economic system in which markets are not at war with life on Earth. But whether that should rightly be called capitalism is another question entirely. Many people seem to be deeply invested in preserving the capitalism brand. We are stuck in this dichotomy that if it’s not capitalism, then it must be state socialism. But it could be something else entirely: a system that starts with the fundamental imperative to protect and renew life on earth, whether that is the right of all people to have enough for a good life or the right of natural systems to regenerate and not be depleted out of existence.

At the UN Climate Summit in September, I spent a day in the Private Sector Forum. The UN was very proud of the record number of CEOs present at the meeting. These business leaders waxed on and on about how they were going to be the ones to solve the climate crisis. They blamed governments for not doing anything, fully impervious to the fact that have been part of a successful counter-revolution—some of them spearheading it—to render our governments as weak as they are. The dissonance was astounding.

In my breakout session, our question was “What is the one thing governments can do to fight climate change, and what is the one thing that corporations can do?” I raised the question of whether or not governments could regulate corporations to require environmentally sustainable behavior. And the response was “Well, that’s not possible anymore. We’ve tried regulation, and it doesn’t work.” I also suggested that it was important to reduce the power of corporate money in politics. If the problem is that governments are weak, here is a way to help them get stronger. That, too, was dismissed as entirely out of hand.

You argue that we need bottom-up change. What would such a dispersed, distributed movement look like, and how likely is it to emerge?

The challenge we face is how to organize out of the rubble of neoliberalism. How do we organize without the institutional supports that our predecessors had? Many of us don’t have jobs to unionize. We have contracts, we are hyper mobile, and we are very hard to organize. The paradox of new technology is that we are easier to find than ever before but much harder to organize in a sustained way.

We see flash movements again and again, ones that burn brightly and quickly burn out. I have been a part of some of these, including the so-called anti-globalization movement and, in a more peripheral way, the Occupy movement. And I think we all understand now that sustaining a movement without a fixed address is a big challenge.

The NGO model—hopping from campaign to campaign and focusing on providing “deliverables” for funders—has also been a corrosive factor to building sustained movements. In the United States, on the right, you have funders who take ideas seriously and very consciously funded an ideological counter-revolution. Liberal donors like George Soros and the Rockefellers are often treated as the antithesis of right-wing donors like the Koch brothers. However, these donors and their foundations tend to be allergic to funding big ideas and structural change, let alone anything that consciously identifies as the left, in favor of time-limited, issue-specific campaigns. There are exceptions, but few and far between. So we have campaigns and issue-based groups, punctuated by brief periods of inter-movement convergence.

If the current model of movement-building is broken, what is needed to replace it?

Coalitions needed to build a broad-based social movement are not going to be funded in the way that the left in the United States is currently funded. Historically, there have been important relationships between trade unions and social movements, a relationship we need to revive. That means overcoming the tired dichotomy that pits jobs against the environment and, instead, bringing whole communities together to map what a real justice-based climate transition would look like—and then fighting for it. Such efforts need to go beyond mere lip service for green jobs and really hash out a vision and program for the next economy. Will public transit be free? How many jobs will it create? Where will the money come from?

We also need to revitalize membership-based organizations and create new ones, and we need to democratize our movements so that there is a system of accountability in place. Right now, after the People’s Climate March in New York, there is nothing to prevent a slick green NGO from attempting to harness all that power in the streets, meeting behind closed doors with politicians, and saying, “Well, what this movement wants is fee and dividend.” Is it? Did anyone ask? The march was about more than just climate action—it was about climate justice. One of the most noteworthy aspects of the march was its racial and economic diversity. And a lot of what was driving that was the hope of climate action representing a real investment in some deeply neglected communities and the possibility of jobs and infrastructure. If you give all the money back from a carbon tax, you no longer have any left to invest in these neglected frontline communities.

You are particularly critical of the large environmental organizations. Why?

Not all of them, and I also work with many of them. I am on the board of 350.org. I have addressed the staff of Greenpeace International. Amazing Sierra Club staff members are featured in our upcoming documentary film. I have huge respect for Friends of the Earth and Food and Water Watch. But I do point out that the environmental movement is not a social movement like the civil rights movement and the labor movement, which relied on large numbers to offset their shortcomings in political and economic power. The roots of conservationism in the US are very elite; one of the primary catalysts was the desire among the affluent to protect wilderness spaces for recreational purposes. This is still reflected in the approach some of the richest green groups take to coalition-building: their first coalition targets are usually big business—so-called “partners”—and even the military.

It is important to understand that these elite coalitions can and do come at the expense of other coalitions, ones that are not sought. The climate movement’s most natural allies—the people who have the most to lose from inaction because they are on the front lines of fossil fuel extraction and combustion—are too often never invited, or invited in ways that are perfunctory or seem disingenuous. There is a long and bitter history between the environmental justice movement and some of these big green groups, and these battles are being fought again and again. Real progress is being made in parts of the movement, which we saw during September’s People’s Climate March. But we also have to recognize that parts of the environmental movement do not stand in opposition to the status quo; on the contrary they are deeply invested within it. That means there are real limits to the scale of change they will support, even when science demands it.

What is needed to shift advocacy from specific issues and mainstream strategies to acting and thinking more systemically and structurally?

We will not win any of this unless we engage in a deep battle of worldviews. Progressives have lost so much ground over the past forty years. Particularly within the climate movement, so much effort has gone into positioning climate action as unthreatening and compatible with the free market worldview.

That is why I think it cannot be just a call for climate action—it has to be a call for climate justice. We need to be clear about the values and principles that underpin our demands. We need a polluter-pays framework so that those most responsible bear the cost. At the same time, those who have been most victimized by our current toxic economy have to be first in line to benefit from the next economy. That is not only just, but also strategic—since the people with the most to gain will fight hardest.

We need to work on elevating those parts of ourselves that value quality-of-life rather than economic enrichment. Green groups, unfortunately and perhaps unknowingly, reinforce the neoliberal view that we are first and foremost consumers by focusing their efforts on telling people what to buy and where to shop. We need to emphasize the parts of ourselves that love nature, our families, and our communities, and we need to rediscover our identities as active community members and engaged workers, not just consumers.

Are your critiques and solutions equally applicable to the Global North and Global South?

We have a collective global climate crisis and will need a collective global response. What brought me to this issue was having the concept of climate debt explained to me by Bolivia’s trade negotiator. If we are to take climate change seriously, we would have to tackle North-South inequality, including transfers of technology and wealth to heal the festering wounds of political and economic colonialism.

Anybody who has been to a UN climate conference knows that this is the issue over which the talks repeatedly break down. The Global North has been emitting carbon for over two hundred years more, and the impacts are being felt overwhelmingly in the Global South. Absent acceptance of this reality, stalemate will continue.

Latin America offers a glimpse of a path forward. The discourse around anti-extractivism and the rights of nature emerged from indigenous-inspired movements in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Brazil. Pitched battles are ongoing between traditional development-oriented leftist governments and massive social movements disillusioned with decades of neoliberal policies.

On the other side of the Pacific, China’s relentless drive for economic growth, spurred by trade globalization and low-cost labor, has taken a devastating environmental toll on both cities and the countryside. Here, we are afraid to talk about growth because it is seen as untouchable. Everybody is pro-growth. But in Beijing, people are choking on growth. The government is now reducing growth projections and committing to cap its coal use as the environmental costs of unbridled economic expansion become increasingly evident and severe.

We have to build stronger alliances globally so that we can strengthen those forces that have another vision, a non-extractivist vision, of the good society. We need to see the response to climate change as not just an issue, but as a frame that permeates the struggle for all forms of social justice.

Your new book cites the “Great Transition” scenario as a plausible and desirable alternative future that would address the ills of free market capitalism. What is the role of such a vision in mobilizing change?

I cite the Great Transition research in the context of a discussion of capitalism’s growth imperative and the fact that the only breaks from the mindless growth juggernaut have been economic crises. Avoiding those extremes requires that we very carefully plan the economy, something I have started calling a “deliberate economy.” People need to know that moving away from our obsession with GDP growth does not have to mean deprivation and suffering; on the contrary, the “managed degrowth” model means putting our well-being, health, and leisure time back at the center of our economic lives and aspirations. The idea of a Great Transition, along with much other inspiring work coming out of the New Economy movement, expresses that optimism beautifully.

More broadly, there is a desperate need for the different coalitions of the left to get far more engaged with climate change, because this crisis really forces us to decide what kind of societies we want and puts us on a firm, science-based deadline. And that makes it a unique and powerful opportunity.

The world’s social movements need to work together under a common banner to fight climate change. And we certainly need smart frameworks for thinking and talking about the diverse set of solutions that we know can tackle the crisis—from invoking the polluter-pays principle to divert fossil fuel profits into the green transition, to building decentralized, community-owned solar and wind systems, to reining in financial speculation—and making sense of the world that they are already helping us build. Again, I don’t think it is going to be capitalism. But this also isn’t about devising and imposing some kind of one-size-fits-all economic system on the globe, so the emphasis on the creative power of the “transition” itself is especially important.

 

Source URL: http://www.resilience.org/stories/2014-12-19/climate-the-crisis-and-the-movement

 

Resilience is a program of Post Carbon Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping the world transition away from fossil fuels and build sustainable, resilient communities. Content on this site is subject to our fair use notice. Original article: http://greattransition.org/publication/climate-the-crisis-and-the-movement . Published by The Great Transition on 12-19-14.


ST’s April Meeting: Local Water – Localized Food?

Sustainable Tucson’s April Meeting:

Local Water – Localized Food?

 

Monday, April 14, 2014,    5:30 – 8:00 pm

Joel D. Valdez Main Library, Lower Level Meeting Room,

101 N. Stone, (free lower level parking off Alameda St.)

 

How much local food can Tucson produce? And how much local water is available to produce it?

For several thousand years the Tucson region has been producing food for its human population using renewable rainwater and surface flows. Now our food supply is almost entirely imported from long distances, at great energy cost and with potential for disruption. Many Tucsonans are growing food locally for a variety of reasons, and these efforts will tend to make Tucson more resilient should those disruptions come.

But how much is Tucson’s locally grown food dependent on the water supplied by the Central Arizona Project canal with its huge carbon footprint and diminishing supply? Is it possible to grow local food from our seasonal rainfall and, if so, how much? What about water-supplied agriculture from our watershed and aquifer?

Come to Sustainable Tucson’s April 14th meeting to find out.

Speakers will include:

Jay Cole: Off-grid Water Harvesting at the residential scale

Victoria White: Gardening in Avra Valley

Tarenta Baldeschi: Avalon Organic Gardens and Ecovillage, Tumacacori; Community-Scale food production

Doors open at 5:30 pm. The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

ST March Meeting: Preparedness for a World of Change

 

Sustainable Tucson’s March Meeting:
Preparedness for a World of Change

Monday, March 10, 2014,    5:30 – 8:00 pm

Joel D. Valdez Main Library, Lower Level Meeting Room,
101 N. Stone, (free lower level parking off Alameda St.)

Join the Sustainable Tucson community and extended network to hear Nicole Foss, world-renown lecturer and co-creator of TheAutomaticEarth.Com speak from their DVD on Preparedness. Time will be taken to discuss this important subject which all of us are interested in.

Topics include Navigating an Epic Predicament, Psychology of Contraction, De-Globalization, Community and Society, Energy and Resources, Goods and Services, Nutrition and Health, Entertainment and Education, Be Prepared with Hard Goods, To Rent or Own, Community Building, Depression-proof Employment, and Building Robust Systems.

This General Meeting should begin the conversation of what we actually should start doing and acting on.

We hope to see you all there.

Doors open at 5:30. Program begins at 6:00 until 8;00pm

In addition to the General Meeting on Monday, March 10th, there will be an online Whole Earth Summit March 11 -13th, featuring 42 global sustainability leaders including Tucson’s own Brad Lancaster. To see the schedule of speakers and get more info on how you can connect, go to:

    www.WholeEarthSummit.org

This should be an unforgettable convergence of like hearts and minds considering: What’s your vision for a resilient world? How are you creating it now? Food + water + community + regenerative design + social transformation!

February General Mtg: IS YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD READY FOR CLIMATE CHANGE?

Sustainable Tucson’s February Meeting:
IS YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD READY FOR CLIMATE CHANGE?

Monday, February 10, 2014,    5:30 – 8:00 pm

Joel D. Valdez Main Library, Lower Level Meeting Room,
101 N. Stone, (free lower level parking off Alameda St.)

Last November 14th, the State of Arizona ran a simulation of an emergency event that included a 72-hour power outage – the kind of event climate change may visit upon the Tucson region.

Within the first hour of this mock climate emergency county officials realized hospitals would be overwhelmed by those seeking shelter from the 110+ degree heat. With no power for air conditioners or water delivery, and with severely curtailed communications capacity, hospitals became the first option for the most vulnerable seeking safety and shelter.

In the meantime, local emergency response teams with generators powered limited operations but (as in most emergencies) the general public is left to their own resources to manage until outside help arrives. For most, the physical setting of home is where they will wait out the event.
This mock exercise was an eye-opening experience for those who participated – driving home the fact that healthy connections between neighbors will be essential to best outcomes during such an event.

But are Neighborhoods able to respond in such circumstances? Do residents feel part of a community and trust they can turn to their neighbors for assistance?  Who makes sure the most vulnerable are taken care of? Is there a method for neighborhood communication when commercial communications go down? What supplies should be stored and available?

Come to Sustainable Tucson’s February 10th meeting to find out.

Speakers will include:

Louis Valenzuela:  Pima County Health Department

Donna Branch-Gilby:  Climate Smart: Ready or Hot? Building Resilient Neighborhoods working group, and

Donald Ijams:  Neighborhood Support Network

Doors open at 5:30 pm. The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

Who knew that Seoul was a leader in the sharing economy?

Who knew that Seoul was a leader in the sharing economy?
by Richard Heinberg
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Published by Post Carbon Institute on 2013-11-12
Original article: http://www.postcarbon.org/blog-post/1949822-who-knew-that-seoul-was-a
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Did you know that Seoul, South Korea is one of the world’s key sites for post-growth economic re-development? No? Neither did I, until I saw for myself.
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I was pleased to be invited to give the keynote address at a conference titled “Reshaping the Way We Live,” put on by the Seoul Youth Hub, held November 7-8. I had no idea what to expect, and was rather surprised when the event turned out to be one of the most enjoyable and eye-opening in recent memory.
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First, some background on South Korea. The nation has an export-based industrial economy that has expanded rapidly in recent decades; however, its rate of growth has begun to slow and the youth unemployment rate is now north of 22 percent. Korean politics has also taken a worrisome turn: many citizens dispute the legitimacy of the most recent presidential election, which brought to power Park Geun-hye, the daughter of former dictator Park Chung-hee.
Meanwhile Korea’s energy situation could hardly be bleaker: the nation imports essentially all its oil, natural gas, and coal (Korea was once self-sufficient in coal, but production has declined dramatically). It gets some electricity from hydropower, but there is little room for expansion. The country’s 23 nuclear power plants are subject to increasing controversy since the 2011 Fukushima catastrophe in nearby Japan, as many Koreans fear they are now eating radioactive fish.
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The Seoul Youth Hub evidently sees crisis as opportunity. Why else would they ask the author of The End of Growth to address a conference of 18-to-40 year-olds? I came to their attention through a protracted Internet search, but it helped that three of my books have been translated into Korean. Evidently the organizers weren’t shy about conveying a sobering message.
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Lunch with the Youth Hub conference organizers.
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Though I hadn’t visited their country previously, I knew that Koreans have a reputation for being friendly and generous. If my experience is any gauge, the reputation is well deserved. The organizers put me up at a traditional Hanok Korean guesthouse (no chairs or television, just mats on the floor of a beautifully constructed, floor-heated, meticulously scrubbed little pavilion). Nearly all food provided during my stay was also traditional, and included a Buddhist temple meal with multiple courses of artistically crafted vegetarian morsels. Suffice it to say that I felt well taken care of and had a splendid time.
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Now to the conference itself. Except for the opening keynote and a final wrap-up, the sessions were workshops led by eight collaborative groups (including ones from Hong Kong and Japan), each of which is a youth-led organization engaged in social innovation. You can find a list of participating groups at the conference website. The subjects explored ranged from cheese-making to innovations in democratic decision-making; in effect, it amounted to a multi-track laboratory for young people to explore adaptive responses to economic contraction.
Surprisingly, the event was free to the participants. The City of Seoul footed the bill, thanks to Mayor Park Won-soon (more about him in a moment).
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The Seoul Youth Hub is a project of the Seoul Metropolitan Government, and its mandate is to help young people “design a future society” by providing a place where they can share and resolve their problems, experiment with a sharing economy, and “discuss specific policies regarding various agendas such as work-labor, housing, life safety net, business creation, youth politics,” and more. The Hub is also intended as a model and a networking center for similar projects throughout Asia. I highly recommend watching this short video.
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The venue for the conference was the Youth Hub’s headquarters, which features movable walls, furniture made of recycled building materials, open and shared office spaces, informal dormitory nooks, a café, and learning co-laboratories. Altogether, there was far more going on here than I could take in during the two days of the conference, much less describe in a couple of paragraphs.
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On the evening of the first day of the conference I met Mayor Park at his offices in City Hall, a twisty new steel-and-glass structure whose ground floor is devoted to citizen-led social innovation projects.
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Copies of The End of Growth were on the Mayor’s meeting room table. Using an interpreter, we got right to it: he had clearly read the book and asked intelligent questions about it. What would I recommend that he and the City of Seoul do to prepare for the end of economic growth? It was a stunning question, given the circumstances, and he appeared eager to consider whatever suggestions I might offer. I started rattling off a laundry list of ideas—supporting farmers’ markets, community gardens, and other staples of a local food system; discouraging cars while encouraging bicycling and public transport; raising energy building standards to the Passive House level; staging more cultural events to increase the happiness quotient among citizens. When I finished, he recited examples of how he and the City have already begun doing nearly every one of these things. He was saying, in effect, “Check, check, check. Come on, what else have you got? Please tell me, and I’ll see if we can do it!” I suggested he find a way for the City to help bring Transition to Seoul (there are currently two official Transition Initiatives in Japan, none in Korea). He promised to do just that.
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Mayor Park Won-soon
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Whoa, I thought. Who is this guy? I looked up his Wikipedia listing later that night. Before becoming Mayor in 2011, Park Won-soon had a 30-year career as a human rights and social justice activist and spent four months in prison for some of these activities. In recent years he developed a chain of nonprofit “Beautiful Stores,” which collect donations of used items, repair them if needed, and sell them to raise money for the social enterprise movement. There are now over a hundred of these stores throughout Korea.
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Inside a Beautiful Store
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Hard to believe this man is the elected leader of the largest city proper in the world, with a population of over 10 million.
The organizers of the Youth Hub conference think the world of Mayor Park, and I can understand why. I’ve seen a lot of hopeful post-growth initiatives in a lot of places—usually citizen-led and modest in scale; never have I seen such visionary, intelligent leadership at the municipal government level within so large a city.
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This is a country with a hard future ahead. Challenges with energy, the economy, and the environment are lining up (not to mention ever-present tensions with North Korea). Yet if efforts led by Mayor Park and the Seoul Youth Hub manage to flourish, things may go much better than they otherwise would. Perhaps other cities can begin to find inspiration here.
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For a helpful overview of the food sovereignty movement in South Korea, see this article from Foreign Policy in Focus.
Richard Heinberg in front of a Youth Hub garden of Korean cabbage (key ingredient of Kim-Chee)

Content on the Post Carbon Institute site is subject to this fair use notice.

Resilience is a program of Post Carbon Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping the world transition away from fossil fuels and build sustainable, resilient communities.


Source URL: http://www.resilience.org/stories/2013-11-12/who-knew-that-seoul-was-a-leader-in-the-sharing-economy

Tucson Time Traders – Tucson’s Local Timebank

Please see timetraders.metasofa.org for more information on our Timebank orientation meetings and other events.

We’re also at Sustainable Tucson Monthly Meetings to give information about timebanking and Tucson Time Traders, and help you sign up online.

 

TUCSON TIME TRADERS

Helping Build Community 1 Hour at a Time

Tucson Time Traders is our local Timebank for the Tucson region.  Check the website for our latest news and events, or open a new account, or login if you’re a member – http://timetraders.metasofa.org

 

What Is A Time Bank?

A Timebank is a group of people who trade an hour of work for an hour of work – everyone’s time is valued equally.  The hours are recorded in the timebank software so we can trade them around the timebank community.  Timebanking is a great way for people to exchange assistance and help build healthy communities.

Core Values

We are all assets – Every human being has something to contribute.

Redefining work – Some work is beyond price.  We need to value whatever it takes to raise healthy children, build strong families, revitalize neighborhoods, make democracy work, advance social justice, make the planet sustainable.

Reciprocity – Helping works better as a two-way street.  “How can I help you?” becomes “How can we help each other build the world we both will live in?”

Community – We need each other.  Networks are stronger than individuals… People helping each other reweave communities of support, strength and trust.

Respect – Every human being matters.  Respect underlies freedom of speech and freedom of religion, and supplies the heart and soul of democracy.

Intrigued?

Open a Tucson Time Traders account online, and come to an orientation meetingMembership is free and open to everyone.

For some background information, take a quick look at these excellent short videos and a sample of resources within our local timebank.

timetraders.metasofa.org

 
Also see Sustainable Tucson joins Tucson Timebank
and ST February Meeting – Tucson’s Economy

The 4th Annual Water Festival – Tucson Arts Brigade – Earth Day – April 21

Earth Day at Reid Park, Tucson Arts Brigade presents
 

THE WATER FESTIVAL

Synergy of Art, Science, and Community

The 4th Annual Water Festival, presented by Tucson Arts Brigade, raises awareness and promotes stewardship for water and water-related themes relating to sustainability, health, and community.

The Water Festival brings community together through creative and diverse activities for learning, networking, and family friendly fun – featuring an exhibitor fair, workshops, speakers, performances, art show, “The Vibe” Live Art Happenings, Design for Water Solutions Contest, 3-mi Walk for Water, and a mermaid in a wishing well.

This year, The Water Festival is partnering with The Earth Day Festival at Reid Park on Sunday, April 21, 2013, 9am-2pm, and expects over 5,000 people.

 
CALL FOR PARTNERS, EXHIBITORS, ARTISTS & VOLUNTEERS!

Register as a Sponsor, Exhibitor, Artist / Inventor, Activity Leader, or Volunteer.

More info / Register:
phone: 520-623-2119
email: info(at)WaterFestivalTucson.org
web: www.WaterFestivalTucson.org

c/o Tucson Arts Brigade
PO Box 545, Tucson AZ 85702
www.TucsonArtsBrigade.org

Edgar Cahn, TimeBanks USA – How President Obama Can Beat The Odds And Make Good On His Commitments

How President Obama Can Beat The Odds And Make Good On His Commitments

from Edgar S. Cahn, CEO TimeBanks USA,
Distinguished Professor of Law, UDC David A. Clarke School of Law

In his Inaugural Address, President Obama made some commitments that seem to defy fiscal reality:

  “A little girl born into the bleakest poverty knows that she has the same chance to succeed as anyone else.”

  “We reject the belief that America must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future.”

  “We must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit.”

The problem: there are not enough funds, public, private, philanthropic to pay the cost, at market prices, for all the educational services and all the health care services needed to make good on those promises.

For a quarter century, the TimeBanking community has been demonstrating how to make the impossible possible.  There is vast untapped capacity in community.  We have proven that:

  • Healthy seniors and their families can provide reliable, informal care that reduces medical costs.

  • Fifth graders can tutor third graders who otherwise fail to attain essential reading levels.

  • Teenagers can tutor elementary school children using evidence-based cross-age peer tutoring.

How could this get paid for?  How can we record, recognize and reward labor from a work force that is not recognized or valued by the GDP?  For decades, the TimeBank community in the United States and thirty four other countries has been learning how to do it, teaching us all that every one of us has something special to give.

The function of a medium of exchange is to put supply and demand, capacity and need together.  What money does not value, TimeBanking does.  TimeBanking provides a tax-exempt, local medium of exchange that uses Time as a currency.  One hour helping another (regardless of mainstream market value) equal one Time Credit.  TimeBanking has proven capable of harnessing vast untapped capacity that the market does not value to address vast unmet needs.

Ask the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation which just made a major award to Neighborhood Health Centers of Lehigh Valley to utilize its TimeBank program as a resource to help build a super utilizer intervention program to reduce health care costs.  For ten years, home visits by Lehigh Valley TimeBank members functioning as health coaches and providing informal support have helped folks with chronic problems stay healthy and at home.

Ask Mayor Bloomberg’s Department for the Aging which has established TimeBank programs for seniors in all five boroughs to provide the kind of informal support needed to promote health and prevent unnecessary utilization of the emergency room care by elders.

Ask the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (with a 3,000 member TimeBank) that reports that 79% of TimeBank members felt that their membership gives them support they need to be able to stay in their homes and community as they get older and 100% reported they have benefited from becoming a TimeBank member.

Ask the National Education Association or do a Google search to see if Cross-Age Peer Tutoring rates the status of an evidence-based instructional and remedial strategy.

Ask the Washington State Office of Public Instruction for its authoritative manual on Cross-Age Peer Tutoring.

Ask the National Science Foundation why it granted nearly $1million dollars to Pennsylvania State University Center for Human-Computer Interaction to develop mobile apps for TimeBanking so every Smartphone user can be a time banker.

It’s time America discovered its vast hidden wealth: people not in the work force – seniors, teenagers, children, the disabled – whose energy and capacity has been tapped by TimeBanking for over a quarter century to strengthen fragile families, rebuild community, enhance health, promote trust, restore hope.

President Obama, if you want to do the impossible, it’s time to bet on each other and on our collective capacity.  TimeBanking supplies a medium of exchange that translates “Created Equal” into a currency that embodies that equality.  If we take it to scale, we can make good on delivering those “inalienable rights” to life, liberty and pursuit of happiness promised to every one of us by the Founding Fathers.

Also see TimeBanks USA and Tucson Time Traders

Stop TUSD closing eco-schools before Dec 20th ! – Public meetings Dec 8 & 10

at Catalina Magnet High School Auditorium, 3645 East Pima St (at Dodge Blvd)

 
Dear climate activists,

As you probably know, many Tucson schools are slated for possible closure, especially on the west and southwest sides of town. Some of these schools have shown great leadership in preparing our students for the real future: teaching ecology, climate science, and practical skills like gardening and bicycling.

These decisions cannot be finalized without public input, and a series of meetings is taking place in preparation for a final vote by the TUSD governing board, set for Dec. 20.

Public meetings at Catalina High, tomorrow and Monday, will address the closings of Manzo Elementary and Wakefield Middle schools, among others. – Saturday, Dec. 8, at 10:00 a.m., and Monday, Dec. 10, at 6:00 p.m., Catalina Magnet High School Auditorium, 3645 E. Pima St. (at Dodge Blvd.)

Tucson Audubon Society is participating in a campaign to save Manzo Elementary in particular. According to the Tucson Audubon Society,

“Tucson has a groundbreaking elementary school that engages students in practical ecology. … This innovative flagship school serves an unmet need … in Tucson. As such it is a key asset in Tucson’s future ability to reverse habitat loss, support declining wildlife species, mitigate for and adapt to climate change, and make the most of our scarce water resources. Manzo’s rainwater harvesting, urban food production and wildlife programs provide a model for all schools across the arid southwest and beyond.”

They invite you to view their letter to the TUSD board, tucsonaudubon.org/images/stories/temporary%20events/Manzo_Letter_LO_Final.pdf, and to write to the board yourself; contact info here tusd1.org/contents/govboard/govboard.html

A good source of info on the school closings issue in general is Equity for TUSD Schools, on Facebook, facebook.com/equityforTUSDschools?ref=stream

Wakefield is one of the schools most involved in bike education and with among the highest proportion of students who bike to school: tucsonvelo.com/news/pima-countys-biggest-bicycle-school-on-tusd-closure-list/14967

Thanks for giving your attention to the health of our planet at all scales, from local to international!

Suzanne and Miriam, members of the Tucson Climate Action Network

Earth Harmony Festival – Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage – Oct 6-7

at Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage, Tumacácori, AZ (South of Tucson)
Free admission, donations appreciated

Earth Harmony Festival

A weekend celebration devoted to creating a sustainable future now. EcoVillage tours on water harvesting, green building, organic gardening, solar energy, composting, and more. Live music, food, arts, children’s village, hay rides, pony rides, and other activities including special eco-presentations featuring Gary Nabhan.

For info & directions – http://earthharmonyfestival.org/ or call (520) 398-2542

 

Earth Harmony Festival Promotes Global Cooperation to Achieve Sustainability

Tumacácori, Arizona – Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage presents the Earth Harmony Festival, a weekend celebration devoted to creating a sustainable future now. The festival will be held Saturday & Sunday, October 6-7th in Tumacácori, Arizona, South of Tucson.

The vision of the Earth Harmony Festival is to encourage a restoration of balance to the world’s people and ecosystems through environmental awareness, education, and a commitment to peace and unity without uniformity. Festival coordinator TiyiEndea DellErba says, “This year’s Earth Harmony Festival shares some practical solutions to the social, spiritual and environmental issues we face in our world today.”

The Earth Harmony Festival is held at Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage, one of the largest member EcoVillages in the world, nestled on 165-acres in the beautiful Santa Cruz Valley. Their sustainable practices include organic farming, education and the preservation of food diversity, permaculture principles, green building techniques, water harvesting, composting, alternative clean energy, and more. Avalon Gardens’ Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program was the first established in Arizona, feeding more than 100 people since 1995.

Internationally-celebrated author Gary Paul Nabhan will be the keynote speaker on Saturday, October 6th. Nabhan is a conservation biologist, a seed saver, and sustainable agriculture activist and has been called “the father of the local food movement”.

The core of the festival will be the ongoing tours of their working EcoVillage. From Solar Panels, to Rain Water Harvesting, to Organic Gardening, to Green Buildings, to Home-Made Goat Cheese, these EcoVillage tours will have something for every interest. Participants are encouraged to donate for the tours to help foster the EcoVillage’s many projects which are prototypes for creating a more sustainable, environmentally-conscious world.

In addition, live music, fine local art, locally made breads, food, and other natural products’ booths, a children’s village, hay rides, and special presentations by Master Gardeners, Kamon Lilly and Tarenta Baldeschi, will round out the weekend festivities.

Live music for the festival is provided by Global Change Music Nonprofit Record Label, featuring TaliasVan & The 11-piece Bright & Morning Star Band performing CosmoPop, music of the future for minds of the future. Additional artists performing are Van’sGuard, Starseed Acoustic Ensemble, and The Change Agents Band. Global Change Music lyrics speak of taking action against any form of injustice. Global Change Music promotes sustainable living, which includes growing organic food, building green, permaculture, sharing services and goods (trade and barter), and having a protective environmental consciousness.

Admission to the festival is free. Donations are appreciated to help support Avalon Gardens Internships and the Personality Integration Rehabilitation Program — nonprofit programs that assist individuals from diverse backgrounds in various levels of healing, training, and education in order to actualize their dreams and talents.

Amadon DellErba, an activist and festival promoter, encourages people to Occupy Avalon Gardens for a few days at the Earth Harmony Festival. “I hope this festival can teach and inspire others to live a more sustainable lifestyle, to come out of the age of competition, and into the age of cooperation.”

The Earth Harmony Festivals were started in the late 1990s by Gabriel of Urantia and Niánn Emerson Chase in Sedona, Arizona.

Camping is available by donation. For more information and camping reservations visit http://earthharmonyfestival.org/ or call 520-398-2542.

Envision Tucson Sustainable Festival – Oct 21

at Reid Park in Tucson AZ, free and open to the public

 

ENVISION TUCSON SUSTAINABLE FESTIVAL
A Community Event for a Bright Future

By Clinton MacKillop
September 26, 2012

Tucson, AZEnvision Tucson Sustainable and Sustainable Tucson announce the 2nd annual “Envision Tucson Sustainable” festival. The festival will take place at Reid Park on Sunday, October 21st, 2012, from 9am – 5pm. All ages are welcome.

Festival planners invite individuals and families to participate in a day of fun while exploring Tucson’s sustainable culture. The festival will promote the people, organizations, and companies in Tucson who provide services, education, and resources to help us achieve a sustainable future for our community.

The main focus of the festival this year is sustainable, secure food and agriculture for Tucson and Southern Arizona. This event will kick off a week of events in Tucson celebrating Food Day, a nationwide event promoting healthy, affordable, and sustainable food. Food vendors will feature locally sourced, organic refreshments. This year the Festival will also include a special feature: a “Non-GMO Food Zone.” In addition, in keeping with the theme, the festival will include practical information on aquaponics, an innovative, energy- and water-saving system of food production that fully integrates raising fish and growing vegetables, herbs, or other plants.

Throughout the festival, exhibits, demonstrations, and speakers will address many facets of a sustainable life, from energy and green business to health, from organic gardening to the homes we live in. The festival will be solar powered, thanks to the Solar Store, and there will be opportunities to learn about solar power for home or business.

A large family activity area will feature “Rexie,” the T-Rex Museum’s sustainability spokes-kid. Children will be able to hunt for and keep fossils from hundreds of millions of years ago.

The Festival is free and open to the public.

For more information, please visit www.facebook.com/EnvisionTucsonSustainable and click on events, or visit the festival website www.tucsonsustainable.org

For more information on Food Day events October 20-28, please visit www.tucsonfoodday.com

Second Annual Home-scape Tour – Watershed Management Group – Oct 20

Tucson, AZ

 

Second Annual Watershed Management Group Home-scape Tour
Saturday, October 20

Did the new City of Tucson rainwater-harvesting rebate rouse your interest in capturing the rain that falls on your own property?

Curious about implementing other backyard sustainability practices such as chicken coops, food production, greywater, composting systems, and even solar-heated outside showers?

Not really sure where to start and what practices are best suited to you and your site?

Watershed Management Group’s second annual Home Tour will demonstrate best water saving practices and more. Come and find out how landscape water savings do not equal zero scape or even necessarily Xeriscape, how soil building can have multiple benefits.

The self-guided tour will be on Saturday October 20 between 10 am to 4 pm. Residents will be on hand to guide tourists through the green-living features at their homes, as well as give tips and answer questions about their site and installations.

Cost is $5 to those on a bike or using public transportation and $10 to those in a car. Discounts are available for those who rideshare. Children under 14 participate free!

Local bike Co-op BICAS will be leading a leisurely ride taking in many of the sites. Leave from BICAS at 10 a.m. Cost of $10 with half the proceeds going to WMG and half to BICAS.

For more information visit our home tour website or contact Rhiwena Slack at co-op(at)watershedmg.org or 520-396-3266. To sign up click here.

www.watershedmg.org

Harvest Festival – NS/S Conservation Farm – Sep 15 (changed from Sep 22)

at NS/S Conservation Farm
(note: changed from Sep 22 to Sep 15 !)

 

Reap, Chomp, and Stomp

This Saturday, September 15, 2012 3pm to dark

FARM TOURS ▪ CROP HARVESTING ▪ BEAN STOMPING ▪
POTLUCK DINNER ▪ MUSIC ▪ FRIENDS ▪ FUN!

Please bring:  Appropriate clothing incl. hat, water, a dish, silverware,
and a yummy locally grown organic dish to share

See website for directions to Farm: www.nativeseeds.org

Tucson Time Traders – 2012 aug

Community Picnic/Potluck & Orientation Meetings

at Tucson Ward 3 Office, 1510 E Grant Road (southeast corner of Grant & Vine)
2nd Thursdays, 6 to 8 pm – Aug 9 – Sep 13 – Oct 11 – Nov 8 – Nov 18 (sunday 6:30-8:30pm) – Dec 13

at Himmel Park Library, 1035 N Treat Avenue (1 block south of Speedway)
many Saturdays, noon to 2 pm – Aug 25 – Sep 8 & 22 – Oct 6 & 20 – Nov 3 – Dec 1 (11:30-1:30) – Dec 22

(please go to timetraders.metasofa.org for latest details, dates and times)

We’re also at Sustainable Tucson Monthly Meetings (usually 2nd Monday every month) to give information about timebanking and Tucson Time Traders, and help you sign up online.

 

TUCSON TIME TRADERS

Building Tucson’s Empowerment Network 1 Hour at a Time

Tucson Time Traders is a local Timebank for the Tucson region.  You can go to our website and check our latest calendar & news, or open a new account, or login if you’re a member – http://timetraders.metasofa.org

Community Picnic/Potluck & Orientation Meetings

Everyone is invited to our timebank community orientation meetings, with optional picnic lunch / potluck dinner in the first hour, and a timebank orientation meeting for the second hour.

Before trading with our timebanking community, new members must attend an orientation meeting so we can meet each other in person, and also so we can help everyone make better use of the website.

Experienced members are always welcome and appreciated, and everyone gets one hour of time credit for each meeting attended.  Everyone’s participation is valuable, and benefits everyone in our timebanking community.

Looking forward to seeing you!

Tucson Time Traders has moved to a new website !

Thank you all for your patience and help – We now have a website and timebanking software that simply works.

Our new website includes a community calendar, discussion blog, time banking, and member profiles for finding people and their offers and wants.  It’s all accessible with any web browser, new or old, on your desktop, laptop, or mobile device.  It’s fast and simple to use, and easy to learn – for people who have no time to waste!

Local community currency and timebanking have been waiting decades to be live online with this kind of software, so that it’s finally possible for people to find each other easily, and exchange time and energy transparently and fairly, with almost zero overhead.

You can go to the new website here – timetraders.metasofa.org

Sustainable Tucson July Meeting – Urban Mobility and Urban Form – July 9

at Joel D. Valdez Main Downtown Library, 101 N. Stone, (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

The Sustainability of
Urban Mobility and Urban Form

The July ST General Meeting will feature panel presentations and conversation by special Tucson speakers who are addressing in their work “Sustainable mobility and urban form.” This is a very timely topic on many fronts now:

  City of Tucson’s current ten-year update of the General Plan.

  Anticipation of Tucson’s modern streetcar line.

  Tucson’s love affair with walking, jogging, biking, hiking and using transit.

  Community visioning and planning related to the Imagine Greater Tucson Project.

  The emergence of “urban villages” as places where we could live.

  City of Tucson’s current climate change mitigation and adaptation planning.

  Local adaptation to the global credit and energy contraction now taking place.

Gene Caywood, local transportation planner and leading light for Old Pueblo Trolley presents Tucson mobility: past, present, and future.

Ian Johnson, co-leader of the Living Streets Alliance discusses ways we can all help to create, maintain, and enjoy the culture of “living streets” combining sidewalks, bike paths, and transit where people meet and move.

Steve Farley, Arizona State legislator and public artist talks about the benefits of sustainable transportation and advocacy.

Ann Chaneka,  Pima Association of Governments bicycle planner and recently returning from the international Velo conference in Vancouver presents sustainable urban transportation and bicycle planning.

Tres English, ST Core Team member, talks about “21st Century Tucson – a Network of Urban Villages – More convenient, More accessible, More affordable – NOT More mobile.”

We believe that building a sustainable future will take the cooperation and partnering of residents, businesses, government, institutions and organizations. It is in this spirit that we are reaching out to our members, interested people, and community leaders, bringing them together to focus the wider public on these critical sustainability discussions. Our ultimate intent is to build partnerships and work together toward our common goals.

Join us for another lively Sustainable Tucson General meeting!

Doors open at 5:30 pm.
The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

Also read James Howard Kunstler’s Making Other Arrangements

Dad’s Farm Tour – Huachuca City – May 6

May 6 from 10am to 3pm – Free!
at 30 W. Ivey Road in Huachuca City, just one mile north of Mustang Corners on Hwy 90

Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture, the Sierra Vista Farmers’ Market, and Dad’s Farm sponsor the opportunity to spend a day on a working farm.

Learn viable food production methods for the Sierra Vista area, get gardening tips from an experienced farmer, observe spring/summer crops or the fruit & nut orchard, or learn about mulching and watering systems!

The tour will also include a sustainable agriculture fair with informational booths and local farmers, ranchers, and value-added producers.

For the kids there is a petting zoo, a horse-drawn wagon, and opportunities to experiment with planting seeds.

For further info, visit www.bajaaz.org/calendar or contact Meghan at meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org or 520-331-9821

UA Earth Day 2012 – University of Arizona – April 20

at Main Gate Square on University Boulevard

 

UA Earth Day 2012

Come celebrate UA Earth Day on Friday, April 20th from 4-7:30 p.m. at Main Gate Square on University Boulevard.

The event will feature live entertainment, activities for kids and families, and interactive demonstrations. As many as 60 UA programs and local businesses and organizations will be on hand to inform and engage the Tucson community about their work to make our region and world more sustainable — come and learn how you can participate!

Hosted by UA students, the UA Office of Sustainability, and Main Gate Square, with promotional support from Mrs. Green and the Southern Arizona Green Chamber of Commerce.

Ride your bike and valet for free, or get a parking validation for the nearby Tyndall garage when you patronize a Main Gate business.

How do you move through the city? – Worker Transit Authority

Free – April 27 & 28, May 4 & 5, May 11 & 12 – 5 pm to 8 pm
 
210 East Broadway, Downtown Tucson Arizona

The Worker Transit Authority asks the community

“How do you move through the city?”

A Convergence of Art and Planning

For three weekends in a series of free public events, Tucson residents can participate in this important discussion about land use, infrastructure, transportation, environment and distribution.

Like actual transit authority public process, this project is a form of civic engagement, but unlike actual transit authority pubic process the WTA events are fun!

The project wraps art, parody, and beauty to format new and radical notions of how we can function as individuals and as a society, including an overview of the Worker Transit Authority (WTA), the Consumer Transit System (CTS) & the Bicycle-centric Approach to Planning (BcAP).

The exhibits include interactive maps, brochures, surveys, drawings, sculptures, videos and text.

 

Bill Mackey of Worker, Inc. will present events that incorporate performance, graphics, and data in a participatory manner designed to facilitate discussion among the community.

Collaborators include Jeffrey Buesing, Ben Olmstead, Peter Wilke, Tyler Jorgenson, Dwight Metzger, Cook Signs, Ron and Patricia Schwabe, and the Apparatchiks.

For further information, visit www.workertransitauthority.com from your PC or mobile device and get involved. Feel free to ‘take the survey’ on our homepage.

Funded through the Tucson Pima Arts Council / Kresge Arts in Tucson ll: P.L.A.C.E. Initiative Grants. In kind support from Reproductions Inc., Peach Properties, Organic Kitchen & Zocalo Magazine. Letters of support from City of Tucson Department of Transit, City of Tucson Ward I and VI, Living Streets Alliance, Downtown Partnership, Drachman Institute, Department of Geography University of Arizona, College of Architecture University of Arizona, City of Tucson Office of Conservation & Sustainable Development.

 

Worker Inc. is a company that specializes in exploring the human connections to the built environment, bridging the theory and practice of architecture, the social sciences, planning and art. Since 2009, Worker Inc. has been instrumental in the production of community exhibits – Downtown Tucson Master Plans, Food Paper Alcohol, and You Are Here. The exhibits combine ART + PLANNING, creating a unique platform that is an act of discovery for the community. Visit www.workerincorporated.com for more information about Bill Mackey and Worker, Inc.

Bill Mackey 520.664.4847 workerarchitect(at)yahoo.com

Engaging a New Generation with the Transition Movement

Engaging a New Generation with the Transition Movement

One of the best things about the Transition movement is our ability to learn from each other’s efforts. When we take time to document our challenges, successes, or discoveries, we create opportunities for others to learn from them. Similarly, we benefit when we can adapt the techniques that others have pioneered or when we can avoid the pitfalls that others have revealed. I hope you will join others across the U.S. in contributing to this work by taking this survey and sharing it with other organizers.

How Transition Initiatives Engage with Young People
http://survey.alienrg.com/index.php?sid=69567

I am also happy to share with you the encouragement that Transition US generously offered this week in its e-newsletter: “We’re so excited about this project, that we want to ask TI organizers to help Evan by checking out the survey and contributing their experiences and perspective.”

In order to bring together insights from Transition initiatives across the country about engaging a new generation with the Transition movement, I need your help. I will provide you with the findings of this survey as soon as they are available, but their value depends directly upon your participation and that of other Transition organizers like you. Whether you have ideas and aspirations to share or specific experiences to relate, your participation is vital. Please take a few minutes to take the survey and share this request with the other organizers of your initiative.

Thank you for your commitment to the essential work of Transition.

Regards,

Evan Frisch
efrisch(at)gmail.com

Green Fest: A Celebration of Green Living – Tucson Village Farm – April 7

Bookmans, Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona and Tucson Village Farm Gear Up for Green Fest: A Celebration of Green Living

GREENFEST 2012

Date: Saturday, April 7, 2012
Time: 10:00am – 3:00pm
Location: Tucson Village Farm, 4210 N. Campbell Ave (Across from Trader Joe’s at Campbell and River)
Cost: FREE

Are you interested in “greening” your life? Well Tucson, get ready for a full day of interactive learning and green fun! Bookmans in partnership with the Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona host the third annual GreenFest on April 7 at Tucson Village Farms. This free event features kids activities and green vendors and shows how easy it is to embark upon an eco-friendly lifestyle. To further encourage sustainable and healthful living, reusable water bottles will be given to the first 250 attendees and $5 Bookmans coupons will be handed out to all who ride their bike to the event.

From its inception GreenFest has been dedicated to educating and inspiring the community – children and adults, individuals and families, urban and rural – to build better and greener communities. Tucson provides the perfect stage for such efforts as it already has a plethora of bike paths, smart water usage, farmer’s markets and clean air. Girls Scouts Chief Operating Officer Kristen Culliney notes, “Our goal is to truly engage the community, show them all the amazing things happening locally, and create opportunities to green their lives. Every year the variety of topics at GreenFest expands as does the number of participants. The result is a true collaborative effort where we have something for just about everyone! We cannot wait and hope you join us.”

Festivities to take place at GreenFest include gardening tips from Tucson Organic Gardeners, compost details from Fairfax Companies, tomato starts from Aravaipa Heirlooms and solar frozen ice cream from Isabella’s Ice Cream who will be driving to the event using electric power. Arizona Feeds County Store, Mrs. Green’s World, Tucson Village Farms, the Community Food Bank, GeoInnovation, Habitat for Humanity, Heifer International, Renee’s Organic Oven, Tucson Macaroni Kid, A Slice of Heaven, Prickly Pops, Technicians for Sustainability, Tucson Clean and Beautiful and the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension will be on hand with their products and to answer your questions.

Come to GreenFest, enjoy the fresh springtime air and see how small changes can make a big impact when done together.

For more information visit: http://bookmans.com/content/greenfest-2012 or look us up on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/GreenFestTucson

About Girl Scouts
Girl Scouts is the world’s preeminent leadership development organization dedicated to helping build girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. GSSoAz serves over 14,000 girls in Southern Arizona and includes over 1,500 adult volunteers. For more information on Girl Scouting in Southern Arizona, please contact Maria DeCabooter, Advocacy Specialist, 520.319.3175, mdecabooter(at)girlscoutssoaz.org

Holiday Farmers’ Market

December 15th, 3-6 pm, at 100 S. Avenida del Convento, near the corner of Congress and Grande

This holiday season, Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market shoppers will find a variety of distinctively southwest gifts to choose from at our weekly Thursday market.

Our healthy and locally made gifts include raw mesquite honey, prickly pear jams, mesquite flour mixes, Sonoran plants and more.

If market goers are looking for a more personal gift, on December 15th they will also have the opportunity to make holiday ornaments with their children at our arts and crafts table.  These family friendly craft activities are free of charge and will be located alongside our live music and comfortable grassy courtyard.

Those shoppers preparing for an upcoming holiday meal can also expect to find a great selection of sweet potatoes, green onions, apples, early citrus and a variety of leafy greens and winter squash.

For more information, please call 882-3304

Pima County Food Systems Alliance – Meeting & Potluck – Nov 30

On November 30th (this Wednesday) from 6-8 pm, there will be a large group meeting of the Pima County Food Systems Alliance (PCFSA) with a potluck at the Sam Lena Library (1607 S. 6th Ave, Tucson; call 520.594.5265 for directions)

The Agenda is as follows:

  1. Welcome & Introduction (Nick) (5 min; 6:00-6:05)
  2. Presentation by PCFSA Consultants (Bryn/Lewis) (25 min; 6:05-6:30)
  3. Break & Get Food; Potluck (5 min; 6:30-6:35)
  4. Workgroup Activity (Bryn/Lewis) (1 hour; 6:35-7:35)
  5. Activity: Getting involved in the Policy Process (Jaime) (5 min; 7:35-7:45)
  6. Next Steps (Lewis) (15 min; 7:45-8:00)

Bring your friends & colleagues, plus a taste of your favorite or signature Thanksgiving dish.  And check out our Facebook page!

The Pima County Food Systems Alliance is an open membership network comprised of a variety of groups and individuals—including but not limited to farmers, chefs, restaurants, schools, educators, youth, gardeners, researchers, food banks, health professionals, attorneys, nonprofits, activists, and consumers.  The Alliance works in a collaborative manner to serve as a space to invite discussion and foster learning and education for those who are directly affected by food insecurity, as well as legislative decision makers about food policy.

Fall Harvest Fest at Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market

Join us on Thursday Oct. 27th (3pm- 6pm) for family fun at Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market with a veggie scavenger hunt and pumpkin decorating!

When you come to the market you can also expect to find a colorful variety of locally grown organic foods including fresh fruits and veggies, eggs, honey and baked goods.

We are located at Mercado San Agustin, on 100 S. Avenida del Convento, just west of 1-10 off of Congress. We accept foods stamps, WIC checks, cash, credit and debit.  For more information, please contact Monica at 882-3304 or mgarcia(at)communityfoodbank.org.

Hope to see you there!

Tucson Time Traders – at Connect 2 Tucson – Sept 24

We’re starting a local Tucson Timebank soon.  If you’re interested in joining, please pre-register below, and/or contact us by email – timetraders(at)sustainabletucson.org

We will also be at the Connect 2 Tucson – Moving Planet event on September 24 to meet people and give information about time banking.

[ For current information on Tucson Time Traders, please go to
www.sustainabletucson.org/tucson-time-traders ]

What Is A Time Bank?

A TimeBank is a group of people who trade an hour of work for an hour of work.  The time is banked so you can trade accumulated hours with anyone within the network.

TimeBanking is a rapidly growing movement that allows people to trade assistance, and builds healthy communities.

Missions and Values

  • We are all assets.
  • Redefining work – to value whatever it takes to raise healthy children, build strong families, revitalize neighborhoods, make democracy work, advance social justice, make the planet sustainable.
  • Reciprocity – “How can I help you?” becomes “How can we help each other build the world we both will live in?”
  • We need each other – Networks are stronger than individuals.  People help each other reweave communities of support, strength and trust.
  • Respect – Every human being matters.

Intrigued?
Contact us by email – timetraders(at)sustainabletucson.org

TUCSON TIME TRADERS
Building Tucson’s Empowerment Network 1 Hour at a Time

RUMBA-Pro Show

Barrie Herr, Committee Chair, and the RUMBA Committee of Tucson Clean and Beautiful are pleased to invite you to the first annual RUMBA-Pro Show! These RUMBA-Pros* have been generous to show their work at our student RUMBA competitions over the years, and it is time for them to have their own Show!

Please join us: Saturday May 21st from 10 AM—7 PM Artist’s Reception will start at 4 PM  Sunday, May  22nd from 11 AM—3 PM At the Long Realty Office at 1890 E. River (southwest corner of River and Campbell) with plenty of free parking.

Questions? Call Barrie Herr, (520) 235-3955

We look forward to seeing you there!

Common Ground Two

Time again to invite you all to proclaim local community from the rooftops. One rooftop at least.

Join in on the action on the roof of the Pennington St Parking Garage, 110 E. Pennington St.

What is Common Ground?

What it is… is a CELEBRATION, where every group, organization, congregation, small business, performer, artist, EVERYBODY in the Tucson community is invited to show up, share what they do, and… meet the neighbors. It’s a celebration of talent and skills, resources and passions, but most of all, it’s a celebration of connection, of possibility, because in celebrating, the boundaries between us are softened, familiarity then is not so much about agreement as it is about pleasurable proximity. The event is engineered to continually invite interaction, and from that interaction, to draw to the surface defining experiences of what our common needs, and emerging common vision, truly are. What more fertile ground for sustainability could there be?

Come on UP!

Potluck Salad/Dessert Luncheon

First United Methodist Church

Park Avenue at East 4th Street

Parking off 4th behind the church

The annual World Community Day celebration is one of four national Church Women United celebrations.  It is our opportunity to invite members of the wider community to engage in prayerful conversation about community issues that touch us deeply and strengthen relationships among diverse groups devoted to the cause of peace and economic justice.

The program will include: singing; praying together; small group conversations about chosen topics, culminating with suggestions for follow up actions we can take together and with means in place to monitor outcomes; an offering, all of which goes to support our national work; and, a shared meal–a  potluck salad dessert luncheon.  For the luncheon, our hosts will provide drinks, utensils, and napkins.  In the spirit of environmental stewardship, each person is encouraged to bring their own plate.

This celebration embraces one of the four building blocks of our Quadrennial Priority, “Building a World Fit for All God’s Children”– the building block of Economic Justice.  We in Church Women United commit ourselves to promote dignity, safety, and economic opportunities for all.  The other three building blocks are Health, Environmental Care and Peace.

Our vision is one of Beloved Community, a gift from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Over the centuries, many religious groups, sects and orders have worked at creating communities that reflect principles of justice, equality and spiritual centeredness. From the beginnings of our faith, Christians built their own communities as they contributed to a larger vision of political and social justice. Come and be a part of Church Women United in Tucson’s invitation to interact with people of faith about issues that affect us all.

For more information or if you would like to be included in the program, contact program co-chair  Vera Lander at 770-9861 or veralander@yahoo.com.  Olga Tafolla is Vera’s co-leader.

Shockingly Sane Solutions Rally

2602 E. Grant Road

The Rally will be held locally while Jon Stewart’s Rally to Restore Sanity and
Stephen Colbert’s March to Keep Fear Alive occur in Washington, D.C. Our rally
highlights Tucson organizations that are providing sane solutions to intensifying
global challenges.

A solar-powered sound system will broadcast the tunes of local musicians,
a solar oven demonstration will be cooking food, & a Really Really Free Market
will be held for anyone interested in participating. Local groups working on
sustainable alternatives are invited to set up a canopy and table in the south lot for
outreach & new member recruitment. Come join the fun as we show that Arizona
has a lot more to offer than just Sheriff Joe’s pink panties, Governor Brewer’s
intellectual beheading, SB 1070, a deficient educational system, & the other things
the Comedy Central comedians find so funny.

Contact: Mary DeCamp mdecamp@q.com (520) 408-4974

See “A Sense of Wonder” at the Fox

Historic Fox Theatre, 17 West Congress, Tucson

A Sense of Wonder: a celebration of children and nature, a film about Rachel Carson will be shown at the historic Fox Theater. This gala evening event for adults and youth 12 and above will include appearances by Pete Mesquitey and Eb Eberlein. The event will be catered by Cafe 54.

Tickets will be available through the Historic Fox Theatre online or at the Box Office. $20/adult, $10/youth

Put it on the map!

Dear Community Friends and Partners:

The first print edition of the Green Pueblo Map showcasing our community’s favorite “green” places and spaces will be available later this year.  If you haven’t already done so, we encourage you to “make your mark” on the map by nominating your favorite sustainable sites at www.greenpueblomap.org . Please also encourage your friends and colleagues to participate.

Nominations are being accepted in more than 30 categories, including community gardens, solar sites, recycling centers, re-use shops, public parks, scenic vistas, rainwater harvesting locations, and historical sites.  It takes only a minute to nominate a site and you do not have to provide any personal information other than a zip code.  Once a site is nominated, it will typically appear on the website within a month.  A selection of sites will also appear on a printed version of the map.  If you want your site(s) to be considered for the printed map, please submit your nomination(s) by April 1, 2010.

The Green Pueblo Map is a free, community-based mapping effort.  The on-line map is constantly evolving and reflects the community we are all creating together.  Residents are encouraged to visit www.greenpueblomap.org at anytime to help identify and explore the features that promote sustainable living and which makes our region such a special place to live.

Pima County, the City of Tucson, and The Inner Connection are organizing the Green Pueblo mapping effort.  However, the project is part of a much broader, international green mapping initiative that began in New York City in 1995, and has since spread to 55 countries.  For more information, please visit www.greenmap.org .

Water Resources Research Center Conference

The WRRC invites you to participate in the 2010 Annual Conference, Creating New Leadership for Arizona’s Water and Environment in a Time of Change, at the University of Arizona Memorial Student Union on June 9-10, 2010. The conference will provide a forum for youth leaders and young professionals to interact with established professionals and together develop strategies for fostering leadership on environmental and water issues. If you see yourself as an emerging leader with a desire to learn how to make a difference; as a mentor able to guide aspiring leaders with your experience; as someone in-between, with experience but more to learn; or just as someone with an interest in seeing water and environmental leadership emerge in Arizona – you should plan to attend this conference.

At the conference, you will hear inspirational stories from people who are making a difference in the environmental field, perspectives on leadership from multiple sectors of society, and open discussion about the challenges facing Arizona. Two Roundtable sessions will allow participants to engage interactively in small groups on specific issues. A dinner and evening program, interconnecting water, environment and art, will wind up the first day. The optional workshops on the second day will provide opportunities for participants to lay out strategic action plans addressing issues of leadership, policy, communication and education.

A Showcase session on the first day will feature visual displays on the activities of participating individuals and organizations and provide opportunities for informal one-on-one conversations between aspiring and established leaders. We are now accepting proposals for Showcase poster displays. If you or your organization would like a spot in the Showcase, contact Melissa Lamberton at mllamb@email.arizona.edu or 520-621-9591 x52.

A preliminary agenda is posted at http://www.cals.arizona.edu/azwater/.
On-line registration for the conference will open April 5.
Sponsorship opportunities are still available.
For information contact Susanna Eden 520-621-9591 x61 or seden@cals.arizona.edu.
Other questions? Contact Jane Cripps at: jcripps@cals.arizona.edu 520-921-9591 ext 55

The Water Project

Celebrate our most precious and endangered resource -WATER -with the The Water Project: Tucson’s Synergistic Water Festival on March 26-28, 2010. This event combines the energy of Tucson’s sustainability community with the vibrant arts community to provide an opportunity for the public to experience a festive collaboration, learn about water issues and have some fun!

This one of a kind participatory event celebrates, educates and facilitates the creative problem-solving of water issues through a multiplicity of sensory experiences:

• Performance: participant driven dance, theatre, puppetry and more

• Fashion Show: water theme character costumes and entertainment

• Art Happenings: side shows, paintings, sculptures, live music, creative maps and more

• Film Festival: water themed films with discussions

• Vendor & Info Tables: local and regional organizations, artisans and businesses involved in water issues

• Interactive Panel Discussion: informative community participation to creatively address water solutions

• Water Ritual: cross-cultural and interfaith expressions of water

The Water Project is the first annual event commemorating World Water Week in Tucson with a series of events that coincide with the international observance of World Water Day, an initiative founded at the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED).

For more information, contact:

Jodi Netzer, Director/Producer, Jodi@WaterProjectFestival.org, 1.267.334.7857
Victoria Falcone-Camey, Event & Sponsorship Coordinator, Victoria@WaterProjectFestival.org, 1.520.305.9367

or visit http://www.WaterProjectFestival.org

A little inspiration for the new year

A palindrome reads the same backwards as forward. This video reads the exact opposite backwards as forward.  Not only does it read the opposite, the meaning is the exact opposite.

This is only a 1 minute, 44 second video and it is brilliant. Make sure you read as well as listen…forward and backward.

This is a video that was submitted in a contest by a 20-year old. The contest was titled “u @ 50” by AARP. This video won second place. When they showed it, everyone in the room was awe-struck and broke into spontaneous applause. So simple and yet so brilliant..

Take a minute and watch it.

Sustainable Tucson General Meeting

The focus of the Sustainable Tucson General Meeting will be Food Sustainability. On February 8, your view of food sustainability in Tucson ’s future may change forever. The Sustainable Tucson Working Group on Food & Agriculture will engage your mind and your tastebuds in thinking about the sources of food in Tucson, Pima County and Southern Arizona. The February General Meeting of Sustainable Tucson will feature presentations and activities designed to help us understand our food resources. We’ll look at food facts and information that define our food supply, population, farmers and ranchers, farmers markets, traditional food sources and eating trends for local and natural foods in our desert home. Come join us. Be prepared to participate.

Ironwood Ridge High School Earth Awareness Day

On behalf of Club Green, we would like you to participate in our 2nd Annual Earth Awareness day on April 11th 2008. This will be a day in celebration of and education about Earth Awareness and the environmental problems and solutions that we face everyday.

Last year was our first Earth Awareness and it was a big hit. It was very successful in all aspects; in teaching our community about a green planet and getting students involved. The turn out for this event was amazing along with the support. This event received a lot of publicity from the newspaper and news stations. All of the attention gave our participates a great chance to get their names out last year, and this year it could be your turn.

Club Green is made up of students with a demonstrated interest in environmental issues. We have created Project Green, which includes a geodesic greenhouse, herb gardens, ponds, an amphitheater/outdoor classroom, and many demonstration gardens. The club is student initiated and run, with all projects student designed and all fund raising being student -centered. We meet every week to discuss how we can create an environment friendly campus and inform the public on how to keep our community and world green as well. We also regularly take part in holidays such as Earth Day and Earth Awareness Day to encourage protecting the environment.

As you already know, our environment is in danger and many people are unaware of the consequences of not taking care of our environment. Global warming is a huge atmospheric problem causing many living organisms and their environments to respond unfavorably. The social and economic factors should also to be taken seriously as well. Another result includes increasing extreme weather events such as droughts, floods, heat waves, and stronger hurricanes. This causes damage to communities and families that then in turn cost money to fix. The spread of disease is also increasing (such as West Nile Virus). Climate change is threatening entire cultures, nations, and life forms. People are not prepared for what is heading our way and do not know how to prevent global warming. This is why we are asking you to please join us on Earth Awareness Day to educate everyone. Education is the key to changing people’s attitudes about the environment.

We are inviting everyone to participate in the event. It will happen on Friday April 11th. You may set up a booth and donations are gladly accepted. This is the chance to sell your product as well as inform your customers about the good it will do for the environment. If you have any further questions, please contact Leah Goedecke at 520-797-4715 or Mr. Jim Ewing at 520-407-4143.
Thank you for your time. We hope to see you there.