How Do We Grow Our Food? – Native Seeds/SEARCH Free Monthly Salon – Sep 17

at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N Campbell Ave, Tucson (please note new time)

 

How Do We Grow Our Food?

A panel discussion with growers from River Road Gardens, High Energy Farm, Sleeping Frog and the NS/S Conservation Farm.

No till, cover crops, Effective Microorganisms, biodynamic and good ole elbow grease are some of the many strategies employed by our local growers. Learn about favorite methodologies from our favorite farmers and take some great insights home to your own garden!

Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N. Campbell Ave.

www.nativeseeds.org

Gardening for Wildlife and Sustainability – NS/S Green Bag Lunch – Sep 25

at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N Campbell Ave, Tucson

 

Gardening for Wildlife and Sustainability

with Kendall Kroesen

Tuesday, September 25, 2012
Noon – 1 pm

As the summer swelter recedes, we are excited to bring back your favorite mid-day brainfood break! Join us for the return of our Green Bag Lunch series with an afternoon nosh featuring Kendall Kroesen of Tucson Audubon Society. Kendall will give a  presentation to help us plan our winter gardens with the amazing wildlife of the Sonoran Desert in mind.

Green Bag Lunches are held on the last Tuesday of the month at our Retail Store at 3061 N. Campbell Avenue – a free “lunch-and-learn” gathering serving up plenty of food for thought. Bring your lunch and an appetite for mind-watering discussion!

www.nativeseeds.org

Harvest Festival – NS/S Conservation Farm – Sep 15 (changed from Sep 22)

at NS/S Conservation Farm
(note: changed from Sep 22 to Sep 15 !)

 

Reap, Chomp, and Stomp

This Saturday, September 15, 2012 3pm to dark

FARM TOURS ▪ CROP HARVESTING ▪ BEAN STOMPING ▪
POTLUCK DINNER ▪ MUSIC ▪ FRIENDS ▪ FUN!

Please bring:  Appropriate clothing incl. hat, water, a dish, silverware,
and a yummy locally grown organic dish to share

See website for directions to Farm: www.nativeseeds.org

Crucial ACC Election for Climate Activists – TUCAN Workshop Sep 8

at Miller Golf Links Public Library, 9640 E Golf Links Rd, Tucson (see below about carpooling)

Crucial ACC Election for Climate Activists

Workshop on September 8 Saturday 1 p.m., free t-shirt

Dear Climate Activist,

In the 2012, three of five seats at the Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) are up for election. This election will decide the future of energy efficiency and solar power in Arizona. The Grand Canyon Chapter of the Sierra Club has endorsed three candidates for the ACC. They are incumbents Paul Newman and Sandra Kennedy, and newcomer Marcia Busching.

Please join us on Saturday, September 8th to learn what you can do to elect the Solar Team – Newman, Kennedy, Busching – and help make Arizona the Solar State and a leader for energy independence. A well respected individual from the solar industry will join us to debunk some myths about solar energy, as well as other wonderful speakers. This election will decide our energy future. Please be there to learn how you can help.

Event will take place: Saturday, September 8th at 1pm
Miller Golf Links Public Library at 9640 E. Golf Links Rd., Tucson, Arizona 85730

Carpool: Rides and riders are encouraged to contact Andrea Sirois to set up carpooling. For information (and carpooling) call Andrea Siriois at 707-319-1089 or email arsirois(at)gmail.com

Best,
Laila Amerman
Field Director, Paul Newman 2012 for Arizona Corporation Commission
Work: (623) 850-1338
Email: Laila(at)PaulNewmanAZ.com

ST September Meeting – Sept 10 – Sustainability of Urban Mobility and Urban Form continued – Broadway Boulevard Project

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Downtown (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

Broadway Boulevard Project:
Sustainable Urban Mobility and Form?

As a follow up to Sustainable Tucson’s July meeting, The Sustainability of Urban Mobility and Urban Form, the September 10th meeting will be convening a public conversation furthering the discussion, using the Broadway Boulevard Project as a focus.

Presenters will include
Jen Burdick – Broadway Corridor project manager for the TDOT
Colby Henley – Citizen’s Task Force and local Neighborhood Association member
Tres English – Sustainable Tucson
• and others to be announced

Efforts to incorporate local Neighborhood goals with those of the transportation planning agencies are moving forward through the efforts of the Broadway Citizen’s Task Force (CTF). By the time Sustainable Tucson convenes its meeting on September 10th, the CTF will have conducted 2 public meetings. The findings of the 1st meeting are posted online at http://cms3.tucsonaz.gov/broadway

Neighborhood and City goals should be updated and integrated given the interrelated issues of mobility and urban form. In this age of fiscal and environmental constraints, we have the opportunity (and calling) to redirect limited funds to support live-ability and vibrancy at the neighborhood level while implementing a transportation system that unites and serves the larger city. Additionally, now is the time to address larger embedded issues such as the Urban Heat Island effect (UHI) and Climate Change.

A recent Arizona State University study by leading author, Matei Georgescu (http://geoplan.asu.edu/georgescu-megapolitan) notes that urban development could by itself, increase average June-August temperatures by as much as 7 degrees Fahrenheit by 2050. Add in another 5 degrees due to the effects of greenhouse gas emissions over the same period (United States Global Change Research Project), and it becomes apparent “business as usual” will significantly affect the health, live-ability, and pocketbooks of Tucsonans.

To mitigate temperatures neither current nor future inhabitants of Tucson want to endure and to ensure live-able and vibrant communities we must seek alternatives to current built-environment and mobility practices that solve rather than add to an unsustainable city. The Broadway Boulevard Project discussion is a great place to start.

Join us in conversation September 10th at the Joel Valdez Library, lower level meeting room.

Doors open at 5:30 pm.
The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

Who Owns Our Food? – Native Seeds/SEARCH free monthly salon – Aug 20

Free at NS/S Retail Store, 3061 N. Campbell Ave.

 

“Who Owns Our Food?” with Bill McDorman

Aug. 20th, 5-7 pm (Note new time)

Ten companies own and control 75% of the worlds seeds. How does this affect local food security and the health of our region? More importantly what does this have to do with the nationwide drought and the treasure trove of seeds in the Native Seeds/SEARCH Seed Bank? Join NS/S Executive Director Bill McDorman for a deep discussion on this vital topic and hear about the solutions as close as your own backyard!

No Coal in Tucson – Please help leaflet TEP – Aug 9

Wednesday 7pm – TUCAN meeting (every second Wednesday) at the Quaker Meetinghouse, 931 N 5th Ave, Tucson AZ

Thursday 11:30am – press conference and leafletting outside the TEP Headquarters, 88 E Broadway, Tucson AZ

Please help leaflet TEP – No Coal in Tucson

Dear Tucsonan Concerned About Health and Climate,

Tucson Electic (TEP) has refused to stop stockpiling its mountain of coal at its plant on Irvington on the Southside of Tucson, despite our well-publicized media report documenting the deaths of 4 people every year it burns coal – along with $28 million in economic damages to the community!

The Tucson Climate Activist Network (TUCAN) is a coalition of organizations and individuals concerned about climate change.

Burning fossil fuels, especially coal, is the moral issue of our generation, the apartheid of our times. Burning coal releases carbon dioxide causing global warming and thus the droughts, forest fires, heavy rains and wind storms which are becoming the “new normal.”

TEP is a coal company. Over 80% of its generating capacity is coal-fired. Less than 2% is solar. TEP and the fossil fuel industry is rendering our planet uninhabitable, just to make a buck.

Please join us at 11:30 a.m. this Thursday, August 9th, for a press conference and leafletting outside the TEP Headquarters at 88 E. Broadway.

We are demanding that TEP:

  * Immediately cease all further purchases and delivery of coal for the Irvington plant;

  * Pledge not to burn and to remove the current supply of coal being held at the Irvington plant;

  * Develop a plan to achieve a goal of 80% renewable energy sources for the all of its generating facilities including the Sundt plant on Irvington by 2050; and

  * Present the aforementioned plan to the Mayor, City Council, and the general Tucson community by December 31, 2012.

If you would like to join TUCAN and help us prepare for this event, our next monthly meeting (every second Wednesday) is next Wednesday, August 8th (the night before our leafleting) at 7-9 p.m. at 931 N. 5th Ave., the Quaker Meetinghouse.

Thanks for all you do.

Jim Driscoll

National Institute for Peer Support (NIPS)
4151 E. Boulder Springs Way
Tucson, AZ 85712
Phone: 520-250-0509
Email: JimDriscoll(at)NIPSPeerSupport.org
Website: www.NIPSPeerSupport.org

Tucson Time Traders – 2012 aug

Community Picnic/Potluck & Orientation Meetings

at Tucson Ward 3 Office, 1510 E Grant Road (southeast corner of Grant & Vine)
2nd Thursdays, 6 to 8 pm – Aug 9 – Sep 13 – Oct 11 – Nov 8 – Nov 18 (sunday 6:30-8:30pm) – Dec 13

at Himmel Park Library, 1035 N Treat Avenue (1 block south of Speedway)
many Saturdays, noon to 2 pm – Aug 25 – Sep 8 & 22 – Oct 6 & 20 – Nov 3 – Dec 1 (11:30-1:30) – Dec 22

(please go to timetraders.metasofa.org for latest details, dates and times)

We’re also at Sustainable Tucson Monthly Meetings (usually 2nd Monday every month) to give information about timebanking and Tucson Time Traders, and help you sign up online.

 

TUCSON TIME TRADERS

Building Tucson’s Empowerment Network 1 Hour at a Time

Tucson Time Traders is a local Timebank for the Tucson region.  You can go to our website and check our latest calendar & news, or open a new account, or login if you’re a member – http://timetraders.metasofa.org

Community Picnic/Potluck & Orientation Meetings

Everyone is invited to our timebank community orientation meetings, with optional picnic lunch / potluck dinner in the first hour, and a timebank orientation meeting for the second hour.

Before trading with our timebanking community, new members must attend an orientation meeting so we can meet each other in person, and also so we can help everyone make better use of the website.

Experienced members are always welcome and appreciated, and everyone gets one hour of time credit for each meeting attended.  Everyone’s participation is valuable, and benefits everyone in our timebanking community.

Looking forward to seeing you!

Tucson Time Traders has moved to a new website !

Thank you all for your patience and help – We now have a website and timebanking software that simply works.

Our new website includes a community calendar, discussion blog, time banking, and member profiles for finding people and their offers and wants.  It’s all accessible with any web browser, new or old, on your desktop, laptop, or mobile device.  It’s fast and simple to use, and easy to learn – for people who have no time to waste!

Local community currency and timebanking have been waiting decades to be live online with this kind of software, so that it’s finally possible for people to find each other easily, and exchange time and energy transparently and fairly, with almost zero overhead.

You can go to the new website here – timetraders.metasofa.org

Cookbook Author Janet Taylor – NS/S Retail Store – Aug 12

Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N. Campbell Ave. 2 p.m. FREE

SAMPLE THE SOUTHWEST! Hungry for local food inspirations?  Join us for a special engagement with Southwestern chef and cookbook author Janet Taylor.  Ms. Taylor will have delectable samplings on hand from recipes in her latest publication, The Green Southwest Cookbook.  Spend your Sunday afternoon exploring the culinary delights of our flavorful region!

www.nativeseeds.org

Sustainable Tucson August Film Festival – August 12th and 13th

at Joel D. Valdez Main Downtown Library, Large Lower Level Meeting Room, 101 N. Stone, (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

 

Sunday, August 12th 1:00 to 5:00pm, Sustainable Tucson will show three top-rated sustainability films covering critical sustainability topics:

• The U.S. financial crisis erupted in 2008 and still looms on the horizon.

• Resource depletion including non-renewable fossil fuels and clean water threatens further economic growth.

• Global warming and climate change threaten most life-forms including people and future food.

• Social disruption following economic dislocation and government contraction can threaten our capacity to solve-problems and build a more sustainable culture.

• Many solutions are being identified but most require abandoning “business as usual.”

The first film will be shown from 1:00 to 2:30pm and includes a comprehensive presentation of the sustainability crisis and a path way out of our predicament. Many sustainability leaders are interviewed including  Wes Jackson, Paul Hawken, David Suzuki, Kenny Ausubel, David Orr, Janine Benyus,, Stuart Pimm, Richard Heinberg, Paolo Soleri, Thom Hartmann, Lester Brown, James Hillman, Joseph Tainter, James Woolsey, Stephen Schneider, Stephen Hawking, Sandra Postel,  Bill McKibbon, James Hansen, Dr. Andy Weil, Ray Anderson, Andy Lipkis, Tom Linzey, Herman Daly, Peter Warshall, Jerry Mander, Mikhail Gorbachev, Bruce Mau, William McDonough, John Todd, and Gloria Flora among others.

The second film is an award-winning documentary describing the financial crisis which erupted in 2008 and continues to play out today as the global economy is beginning to contract. Financial experts help tell the story of how the largest financial bubble in history grew and finally burst. These include Simon Johnson, George Soros, Satyajit Das, Paul Volker, Nouriel Roubini, U. S. Rep. Barney Frank, Eliot Spitzer, Kenneth Rogoff, Raghuram Rajan, Martin Wolf, Christine Lagarde, and Martin Feldstein among others. This film will be shown from 2:30 to 4:15.

The final film to be shown from 4:15 to 5:00 is a special film which describes how the island nation of Cuba became more self- sufficient and resilient after the food and energy subsidies ended from the Soviet Union which collapsed in 1991.

 

Monday, August 13th, 5:00 to 8:00 pm, Sustainable Tucson will present two excellent films.

The first is a documentary about how the many electric street car systems in U.S towns and cities were intentionally scrapped by a group of automobile-related corporations. The result is that the U.S. is the only industrial country in the world without electric rail systems within and between most cities.  This film will be shown from 5:00 to 6:00pm.

The second film will be shown from 6:15 to 7:45pm and includes a comprehensive presentation of the sustainability crisis and the need to find a path way out of our predicament. Many sustainability leaders are interviewed including Richard Heinberg, Lester Brown, U. S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, Albert Bartlett, Joseph Tainter, David Pimental, Terry Taminen, Bill McKibben, James Hansen, David Korten, Derrick Jensen, and William R. Catton, Jr. among others.

Due to unanswered questions about public licensing, the titles of the films were omitted in this public announcement. The Pima-Tucson Library System does have a general license for showings of films free to the public for educational purposes. This license is granted by a film company consortium but we don’t know for sure about each film. ST falls back on its “fair use” rights under copyright laws to show the films for educational purposes.

We believe that building a sustainable future will take the cooperation and partnering of residents, businesses, government, institutions and organizations. It is in this spirit that we are reaching out to our members, interested people, and community leaders, bringing them together to focus the wider public on these critical sustainability discussions. Our ultimate intent is to build partnerships and work together toward our common goals.

Join us for viewing five great sustainability films in August!

PLEASE NOTE:

Doors open at 1:00 pm on Sunday, August 12th.
Doors open at 4:45 pm on Monday, August 13th

Menu for the Future – Discussion Course – Thursdays July 12 thru Aug 16

six Thursdays from July 12 thru August 16
in Central Tucson

Menu for the Future Discussion Course

Thursdays, July 12 to August 16, 2012 – 6:30 to 8:00pm

Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture offers the Northwest Earth Institute’s Menu for the Future Class, a 6-session discussion course that analyzes the connection between food and sustainability.  The goals of the course are to explore food systems and their impact on culture, society, and ecology; to gain insight into agricultural and individual practices that promote personal and ecological well-being; and to consider your role in creating or supporting sustainable food systems.

Topics covered include:

  • What’s Eating America (explores the effects of modern industrial eating habits on culture, society and ecological systems).
  • Anonymous Food (considers the ecological and economic impacts that have accompanied the changes in how we grow and prepare food).
  • Farming for the Future (examines emerging food system alternatives, highlighting sustainable growing practices, the benefits of small farms and urban food production, and how individuals can make choices that lead to a more sustainable food supply).
  • You Are What You Eat (considers the influences that shape our choices and food policies from the fields to Capitol Hill, and the implications for our health and well-being).
  • Toward a Just Food System (explores the role that governments, communities and individuals can play in addressing hunger, equity, and Fair Trade to create a more just food system).
  • Choices for Change (offers inspiration and practical advice in taking steps to create more sustainable food systems).

How it Works:  Prior to each meeting, participants read short selections from the course book relating to one of the topics listed above (book is provided as part of class fee).  Each gathering consists of open conversation regarding the readings.  Dialogue from a wide range of perspectives and learning through self-discovery are encouraged.  While each session is facilitated by one of the course participants, there is no formal teacher.

The Details:

  • Dates/Time: Weekly meetings occur each Thursday, July 12 to August 16, from 6:30 to 8pm.  Participants must attend all sessions.
  • Location: central Tucson.
  • Cost (for course book): $25 BASA members, $30 non-members (or $45 for course and a one-year BASA membership).

Contact Meghan at meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org or 520-331-9821 for further information.
Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture

Sustainable Tucson July Meeting – Urban Mobility and Urban Form – July 9

at Joel D. Valdez Main Downtown Library, 101 N. Stone, (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

The Sustainability of
Urban Mobility and Urban Form

The July ST General Meeting will feature panel presentations and conversation by special Tucson speakers who are addressing in their work “Sustainable mobility and urban form.” This is a very timely topic on many fronts now:

  City of Tucson’s current ten-year update of the General Plan.

  Anticipation of Tucson’s modern streetcar line.

  Tucson’s love affair with walking, jogging, biking, hiking and using transit.

  Community visioning and planning related to the Imagine Greater Tucson Project.

  The emergence of “urban villages” as places where we could live.

  City of Tucson’s current climate change mitigation and adaptation planning.

  Local adaptation to the global credit and energy contraction now taking place.

Gene Caywood, local transportation planner and leading light for Old Pueblo Trolley presents Tucson mobility: past, present, and future.

Ian Johnson, co-leader of the Living Streets Alliance discusses ways we can all help to create, maintain, and enjoy the culture of “living streets” combining sidewalks, bike paths, and transit where people meet and move.

Steve Farley, Arizona State legislator and public artist talks about the benefits of sustainable transportation and advocacy.

Ann Chaneka,  Pima Association of Governments bicycle planner and recently returning from the international Velo conference in Vancouver presents sustainable urban transportation and bicycle planning.

Tres English, ST Core Team member, talks about “21st Century Tucson – a Network of Urban Villages – More convenient, More accessible, More affordable – NOT More mobile.”

We believe that building a sustainable future will take the cooperation and partnering of residents, businesses, government, institutions and organizations. It is in this spirit that we are reaching out to our members, interested people, and community leaders, bringing them together to focus the wider public on these critical sustainability discussions. Our ultimate intent is to build partnerships and work together toward our common goals.

Join us for another lively Sustainable Tucson General meeting!

Doors open at 5:30 pm.
The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

Also read James Howard Kunstler’s Making Other Arrangements

Rainwater Harvesting – Native Seeds/SEARCH free monthly salon – July 16

Free, at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N. Campbell Ave. (just south of Ft. Lowell)

Rainwater Harvesting

Leona Davis, Education and Advocacy Coordinator
Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona

Harvest those wonderful monsoon rains. Learn about the benefits of rainwater harvesting both in the soil and in storage tanks. Gain an understanding of the cost, system sizing, and materials involved in a variety of home rainwater harvesting systems.

Occupy Arcology – ecological city design lecture & discussion – June 26

Free, at Historic Y conference room, 738 North 5th Ave (at University)

 

OCCUPY ARCOLOGY LECTURE – June 26

Come be a part of a lecture and lively discussion on Occupy Arcology. In this part of the lecture series, hosted by Occupy Tucson’s Doctress Neutopia, we will focus on the question of ecology and economy within the context of an arcology (ecological city design). Any knowledge you have about alternative economics—alternative currencies, time banks, labor relationships, the rights of nature, etc, are welcome in our discussion. So, please come and share your wisdom and knowledge.

Some of the questions to be raised in the discussion are:

What kind of economy fosters health and sustainability with our natural resources?
How do we move into a no-growth, zero-carbon city?
How would William McDonough’s “cradle-to-cradle industrials” move us beyond 20th Century industrials that are polluting our world?
What kind of labor-force is needed to construct an evolutionary city design?
Do we need a new definition of work?
What would a feminist economy, outlined in Riane Eisler’s book The Real Wealth of Nations, look like?
How do we convert military monies into building solar-powered arcologies so that a peace time economy can lead us into a beautiful future?

When: Tuesday June 26th, 2012
Time: 5:00 – 6:30 P.M.
Place: Historic Y’s conference room, 738 North 5th Ave (at University)

For More Info: Contact doctress(at)lovolution.net

Also see http://www.lovolution.net/MainPages/arcology/arcology.htm

GMO-Free “Meet & Eat” – June 21

at Khalsa Montessori School, 3701 River Road, Tucson

 

Start the Summer GMO-Free “Meet & Eat”
www.gmofreeprojectoftucson.org

A little bit meet up, a little bit happy hour, a little bit of learning new information, and a little bit of new and old volunteers getting to know each other and discussing exciting things that are coming up.

We had numerous people say they want to get involved in our group this summer, and we figured why not start this sweltering season with a hot update on the latest information in the GMO-free world, a cool breather with good food, and a rundown of some exciting events we know are coming and other events we would like to schedule with your help in a centrally located, easy-to-get-to venue?

Our Director of Education, Melissa Diane Smith – a nationally known investigative health journalist and nutritionist – will share information she recently learned in interviews she did with some top experts on GMOs.

We’ll also be supplying a wide variety of non-GMO chips that you can enjoy with dip, and organic guacamole. If anyone wants to bring salsa or another non-GMO dip, or veggie sticks for some more variety, please do.

We’ll also be running down the latest on our restaurant program; telling you about a new exciting movie on GMOs that’s coming soon and two sustainable food events later this year that are scheduled to have GMO-free food vendors if we can get enough restaurants on board; and getting the input, ideas, and connections you have to help further the GMO-free cause.

Thursday, June 21st, 2012 – 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Khalsa Montessori School
3701 River Road, Tucson

If you have any questions, email info(at)gmofreeprojectoftucson.org

Support Energy Efficiency Workshop – June 27

at Historic Y conference room, 738 N 5th Ave in Tucson

 

TEP Customers — Help TEP Move Beyond Coal to Clean Energy!
Join us at a free workshop!

You can help move Tucson Electric Power from coal to clean energy! Come to this informative workshop and find out more.

Support Energy Efficiency Workshop
Wednesday, June 27, 6-8 p.m.

Historic Y conference room
738 N. 5th Ave., Tucson (map)

We will discuss what Tucson Electric Power (TEP) can do to get off dirty fossil fuels, including through energy efficiency and renewable energy, and what you can do to help!

The Arizona Corporation Commission will be holding a special open meeting in Tucson on July 11 and taking comments on TEP’s Energy Efficiency Implementation Plan. Our workshop will help you prepare for this meeting and will provide an opportunity to write comments on this important issue.

For more information, please contact Dan Millis at (520) 620-6401 or dan.millis(at)sierraclub.org

Tucson Climate Activists Network – 2nd Wednesdays

 

Every second Wednesday 7-9pm at the Quaker Meetinghouse, 931 N. 5th Ave, Tucson AZ

 

TUCAN (Tucson Climate Activists Network)

TUCAN meets the 2nd Wednesday of each month, 7-9 pm at the Quaker Meetinghouse on 5th Ave, to connect the work of local Climate Change activists.

Contact: Jim Driscoll, Jimdriscoll(at)NIPSPeerSupport.org

Native Seeds/SEARCH free monthly salon – June 18

at NSS Retail Store, 3061 N. Campbell [south of Ft. Lowell]

Ancient and Traditional Water Harvesting in the Southwest

Native Americans have successfully farmed the arid lands of this region for centuries and continue to produce abundant crops.

Join us for another thought-provoking Salon with Melissa Kruse-Peeples, Collections Manager at Native Seeds/SEARCH, for an exploration of the water harvesting practices of ancient farmers in the Southwest.

ST June Meeting – Working Together Toward a Sustainable Community – Part II – June 11

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Downtown (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

Working Together Toward a Sustainable Community
Part II

In March Sustainable Tucson hosted our first “Conversation with our Elected Officials.” One hundred Tucson community members met with Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild, Council Member Regina Romero, and Council Member Steve Kozachik to discuss a wide range of sustainability issues such as water policy, urban form, food security and transportation.

On Monday, June 11, from 6 to 8 pm, Council Member Karin Uhlich, and Leslie Ethan, Director of the City of Tucson Office of Conservation and Sustainable Development, will join us for our second Conversation. A networking session will precede the meeting from 5:30 to 6:00.

We believe that building a sustainable future will take the cooperation and partnering of residents, government, institutions and organizations. It is in this spirit that we are reaching out to our public officials and bringing them together with Sustainable Tucson and the wider public in this discussion and process. Our ultimate intent is to build partnerships and work together toward our common goals.

We invite you to join us in our second conversation with local public officials.

Doors open at 5:30 pm.
The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

Community Water Coalition – Open House – May 23

at Ward 6 Council Office Community Room, 3202 East 1st Street (near Speedway and Country Club)

Community Water Coalition – Open House

Please join the us for a fun and informative meeting of professionals and passionate advocates for a sustainable water future in Southern Arizona! Come find out how you or your organization can get involved. We are having a great year so far, and want to share our vision and successes with you. Snacks and beverages will be provided.

For more information contact Karilyn at 396-3266 or email kroach(at)watershedmg.org

Please use this link to RSVP for this event! – http://watershedmg.org/sites/all/modules/civicrm/extern/url.php?u=2030&qid=119753

 
The Community Water Coalition’s mission is to provide leadership and guidance toward water policy that sustains healthy ecosystems and quality of life in the lower Santa Cruz River watershed.

Accomplishments in 2012:
  * Became a prominent voice in the review of the Tucson Water Service Area policy
  * Published a Guest Opinion in the Arizona Daily Star on Rosemont Mine.

Current Actions:
  * Engaging Imagine Greater Tucson leadership to encourage a focus on sustainability in their process.
  * Supporting efforts to resolve lawsuits and legislation seeking to force water delivery to proposed development at Painted Hills.

 
Member Organizations

Center for Biological Diversity
Coalition for Sonoran Desert Protection
Coalitions of Mutual Endeavor
Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona
­Desert Watch
Native Seeds/SEARCH
Primavera Foundation
Save the Scenic Santa Ritas
Sustainable Tucson
Tucson Audubon
Tucson Mountains Association
Watershed Management Group

Tucson Climate Activists Network – planning meeting & free 350.org activist leadership training – May 9 & 25-27

May 9 (and 2nd Wednesdays) at the Quaker Meetinghouse, 931 N. 5th Ave, Tucson
May 25-27 free workshop at Dunbar Cultural Center Pavilion and boardroom, 325 W. 2nd Street, Tucson AZ

TUCAN (Tucson Climate Activists Network) will meet Wednesday, May 9, 7 pm, 931 N. 5th Ave. (Quaker Meetinghouse) to debrief our highly publicized protest on May 3 asking TEP to stop using coal, and we will plan next steps for all our Action Groups.

In particular, 350.org is offering a free Climate Leaders Workshop Friday thru Sunday, May 25-27 at Dunbar Community Center, no charge, free meals.

DYNAMITE FREE LEADERSHIP TRAINING FOR CLIMATE ACTIVISTS
May 25 – 27

To take the climate change movement to a new level here in Tucson and Southern Arizona, 350.org is paying for a FREE (including meals) weekend leadership training and flying in two of their national trainers to build the skills of about 30 people who would like to do more to save our planet and our species. The content is state-of-the-art, developed by Marshall Ganz from Harvard’s Kennedy School, who designed Barack Obama’s 2008 grassroots campaign and worked with Cesar Chavez for sixteen years. Learn one-on-one, relational organizing (the gold standard for serious campaigns), strategy-making, working with the media and other specific skills. We will tailor the training to the needs of the participants and use our skills to design a local strategy and tactics.

You are invited, as a local climate and clean energy organizer and activist, to join us and other selected environmental leaders for a free three-day Climate Leadership Workshop, sponsored by 350.org. These workshops are being offered across the U.S. and around the world with the purpose of building the strongest possible climate and clean energy movement to address the climate crisis by building the organizing skills of local leaders. Please feel free to pass this invitation on to other climate activists.

The Tucson Climate Leadership Workshop will focus on campaign planning and story-telling, including practical information on traditional and social media, campaign planning, engaging allies, and other critical organizing tools. We will share lessons learned from our experience organizing both local events and international campaigns, and will equip you with skills that can bolster the work you do locally and empower you to more effectively contribute to the broader climate movement.

Dates: Saturday and Sunday, May 26 and 27 (with a welcome event the evening of Friday, May 25)
Times: 5pm-8pm Friday, 9am-5pm Saturday and 9am-4pm Sunday
Location: Dunbar Cultural Center Pavilion and boardroom; 325 W. 2nd St., Tucson, AZ, with low-carbon catering by the Green Gourmet (please indicate dietary preferences)

Please RSVP by May 21 if at all possible. After that, we cannot guarantee dietary requests or give you input to the design of the training. Please go to our Facebook page — 350Tucson (scroll down on the left to the blue box) and fill out the linked questionnaire if you wish to attend, and we will get back to you as soon as possible to confirm.

For more information, contact Vince @ 520-400-7517, or arizona1sky (at) dakotacom.net. There is additional information about the 350 workshops in general at www.350.org.

This training will be capped at approximately 30 participants, and RSVPs will be accepted at least until Monday, May 21. The training is free; we provide all the food and materials. Please consult with us about travel expenses and lodging if you will be travellling in from out of town.

We hope you can join us!
Vince, Patsy, Jim, Dave and the rest of 350’s Team Tucson
Deirdre, Ryan – facilitators
The staff of 350.org and partners

 
Jim Driscoll
Jimdriscoll(at)NIPSPeerSupport.org

TUCAN meets the 2nd Wednesday of each month, 7-9 pm at the Quaker Meetinghouse on 5th Ave. to connect the work of local Climate Change activists.

Soil is Life – Restoring the Soil Food Web – lecture and local foods potluck – May 31

at Saint Marks Church, Third and Alvernon, Tucson

 

Soil is Life – Restoring the Soil Food Web
A Lecture and Local Foods Potluck

Join Watershed Management Group’s Tucson Co-op to celebrate the end of our busiest season to date and to revel in anticipation of the coming monsoons, with our semi annual local foods potluck and lecture.

This event will be held in conjunction with our newest Soil Stewards program and we are excited that Dr. Mitchell Pavao-Zuckerman (of the University of Arizona’s Biosphere 2) will lead an interactive session on the soil food web after the potluck.

Dr Paveo-Zuckerman will discuss its importance for food production, plant growth, and soil water storage. We will examine techniques to enhance soil ecology in the arid urban environment, and help participants develop plans to boost the soil web in their own home landscape.

To find out more and sign up to this free event go to our Tucson Co-op website http://watershedmg.org/co-op/tucson

Date Thursday, May 31
Time: 6:00 p.m. — 8:00 p.m.
Location: Saint Marks Church, Third and Alvernon

Reconsider RTA Broadway Project – Public press conference – April 30

at Assembly of God Church parking lot, NW corner of Broadway & Campbell

 

Neighborhood Support Network / Broadway Corridor

Hi Neighbors,

You and your neighbors are invited to a press conference on Monday, April 30 at Broadway and Campbell that will begin at 6pm – please send around. Speakers will include Council Members Kozachik and Fimbres, Pima County Supervisors Elias and Valadez, as well as reps from Rincon Heights, Sam Hughes and Broadway business owners.

We look forward to seeing a big crowd!

Colby Henley, Rincon Heights

This is a critical point in our efforts to get the RTA to abandon it’s outdated plans for widening Broadway Blvd to 8-lanes and instead allow a Citizen’s Task Force to provide meaningful input to re-scope the project in a way that is within budget and compatible with the surrounding neighborhoods and our desired future for this corridor. We are asking for everyone’s support in two specific ways.

1. We need a big turnout for the press conference on Monday April 30th at 6 PM in the Assembly of God church parking lot on the NW corner of Broadway & Campbell. Steve Kozachik is calling this press conference and is inviting the Mayor and other City Council Members/County Supervisors to attend as well. We need to have HUNDREDS of people show up – so rally your neighbors to attend!

2. We are asking for people to write letters to the editor of the Arizona Daily Star supporting a re-scoping of the Broadway Project and to contact your City Council Member/County Supervisor asking them to add their support to this effort. In your letters, you can emphasize the need for the RTA/TDOT to engage the Citizen’s Task Force in a serious discussion about down-scoping the project to get it back to within the RTA funding level, and to reallocate RTA money saved to other RTA ballot approved projects, and the County Bond money that was earmarked for this project to road repair within the City limits.

Please circulate this call to action among your neighbors and we look forward to seeing a big crowd at the press conference!

Here is a letter recently submitted to the AZ Daily Star by Laura Tabili from Rincon Heights (not yet published):

Councilmember Steve Kozachik and County Executive Chuck Huckelberry have recently called for reconsidering and downscoping the costly and unnecessary Broadway Project. The 1987 plan to widen Broadway is outdated in view of conditions in the street itself as well as up-to-date thinking about sustainable transportation and livable cities. Wasting $71 million taxpayer dollars we simply do not have, widening the street to 150 feet would destroy over 100 local businesses and historic properties, lifeblood of our local economy and tax base.

Up-to-date infrastructure improvements such as bus pullouts, turn bays, and properly timed lights would better move traffic while encouraging bus ridership, biking and walking along a safe and pleasant street. The Broadway Coalition calls on our elected officials on the Board of Supervisors and the Tucson City Council to reconsider this costly and unnecessary project and find a sustainable solution that will better meet Tucson’s needs now and in the future.

Don Ijams, Coordinator
Neighborhood Support Network
email: dsijams(at)gmail.com

Plan Tucson – Urban Agriculture Policy Working Group – May 3

at Sentinel Building Conference Rooms, 320 N. Commerce Park Loop

 

PLAN TUCSON
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEGRITY FOCUS AREA
Urban Agriculture Policy Working Group

Meeting Invitation
Thursday May 3, 2012

Hello,

The Plan Tucson Team appreciates the active participation by agency, organization, and other stakeholders in the Working Groups to develop policies for elements to be addressed in Plan Tucson, the City’s new General Plan now in preparation.

During the Working Group discussions regarding a variety of elements from public health to green infrastructure to land use to economic development, the topic of urban agriculture has come up often enough that staff decided it would be helpful to have a separate meeting devoted to the topic. Therefore, we have arranged a meeting that will include brief presentations on efforts already underway in the City and County to address urban agriculture issues and to provide an opportunity for interested stakeholders to share their thoughts about the topic.

The URBAN AGRICULTURE meeting is scheduled for:

Thursday, May 3, 2012
1:30 pm – 3:00 pm
Sentinel Building Conference Rooms
320 N. Commerce Park Loop

If you would like to attend this meeting, please RSVP by sending an email to plantucson(at)tucsonaz.gov by Tuesday, May 1, and type “Urban Agriculture” in the subject line. If you have any questions, please contact Gina Chorover at gina.chorover(at)tucsonaz.gov or 520‐837‐6946.

If you are unable to join us on this date, but have ideas about Urban Agriculture that you would like considered, please email them to Gina Chorover at the above email address.

Thank you,

Gina Chorover
Plan Tucson Team

The 99% Spring – Non-violent Direct Action Trainings – Tucson April 14 & 15

Three training events & locations in Tucson
 
see below for details & links

 

The 99% Spring – Non-violent Direct Action Trainings

We’re at a crossroads as a country. In recent years, millions have lost their jobs, homes have been foreclosed, and an unconscionable number of children live in poverty. We have to stand up to the people who caused of all this and confront the rampant greed and deliberate manipulation of our democracy and our economy by a tiny minority in the 1%.

Inspired by Occupy Wall Street and the fight for workers in Madison, Wisconsin, the 99% will rise up this spring. In the span of just one week, from April 9-15, 100,000 people will be trained to tell the story of what happened to our economy, learn the history of non-violent direct action, and use that knowledge to take action on our own campaigns to win change.

We’ll gather for trainings in homes, community centers, places of worship, campuses, and public spaces nationwide to learn how to join together in the work of reclaiming our country through sustained non-violent action.

Will you rise with us and join a 99% Spring action training?

Find events within 50 miles of ZIP code 85701

 

Sunday, 15 Apr 2012, 1:30 PM

“Spring Training” for the 99%
Joel Valdez Main Library – Lower Meeting Room
Tucson, AZ 85701

Hosted by Tucson MoveOn Council, Julie Jennings Patterson, Robert Phillips, Ann Yellott, Marty Diamond

 

Saturday, 14 Apr 2012, 9:00 AM

99% Spring Action Training
Armory Park Center
Tucson, AZ 85701

Hosted by melissa donovan, Ethan Beasley, Sherry Mann

 

Saturday, 14 Apr 2012, 10:00 AM

The Power of Nonviolent Direct Action
near Alvernon & Speedway in Tucson
Tucson, AZ 85716

Directions: We are using the north conference room at Our Family Services, 3830 E. Bellevue St.(one block north of Speedway and a few buildings west of Alvernon). Parking is easy and there will be signs showing where to enter the training room.

Hosted by Ann Yellott, Robert Phillips, Melinda Parris, Joan Zatorski, Christopher Puca MD

 

The following organizations have called for a 99% Spring: Jobs With Justice, United Auto Workers,National Peoples Action, National Domestic Workers Alliance, MoveOn.org, New Organizing Institute, Movement Strategy Center, The Other 98%, Service Employees International Union, AFL-CIO, Rebuild the Dream, Color of Change, UNITE-HERE, Greenpeace, Institute for Policy Studies, PICO National Network, New Bottom Line, Veterans of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement, SNCC Legacy Project, United Steel Workers, Working Families Party, Communications Workers of America, United States Student Association, Rainforest Action Network, American Federation of Teachers, Leadership Center for the Common Good, UNITY, National Guestworker Alliance, 350.org, The Ruckus Society, Citizen Engagement Lab, smartMeme Strategy & Training Project, Right to the City Alliance, Pushback Network, Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment, Progressive Democrats of America, Change to Win, Grassroots Global Justice Alliance, Campaign for America’s Future, Public Campaign Action Fund, Fuse Washington, Missourians Organizing for Reform and Empowerment, Citizen Action of New York, Engage, United Electrical Workers Union, National Day Laborers Organizing Network, Alliance for a Just Society, The Partnership for Working Families, United Students Against Sweatshops, Presente.org, Get Equal, American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement, Corporate Accountability International, American Federation of Government Employees, Training for Change, People Organized for Westside Renewal (POWER), Student Labor Action Project, Colorado Progressive Coalition, Green for All, DC Jobs with Justice, Midwest Academy, The Coffee Party, International Forum on Globalization, UFCW International Union, Sunflower Community Action, Illinois People’s Action, Lakeview Action Coalition, Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada, International Brotherhood of the Teamsters, Resource Generation, Highlander Research and Education Center, TakeAction Minnesota, Energy Action Coalition, Earthhome.us.

MoveOn.org Civic Action is hosting the online event registration process but is not responsible for the content or programming of the trainings or for the planning or organization of any specific actions. The 99% Spring is a collaborative effort between many organizations to train over 100,000 Americans in the basics of nonviolent direct action — not an electoral campaign.

http://civic.moveon.org/event/events/index.html?action_id=268&rc=99350

How do you move through the city? – Worker Transit Authority

Free – April 27 & 28, May 4 & 5, May 11 & 12 – 5 pm to 8 pm
 
210 East Broadway, Downtown Tucson Arizona

The Worker Transit Authority asks the community

“How do you move through the city?”

A Convergence of Art and Planning

For three weekends in a series of free public events, Tucson residents can participate in this important discussion about land use, infrastructure, transportation, environment and distribution.

Like actual transit authority public process, this project is a form of civic engagement, but unlike actual transit authority pubic process the WTA events are fun!

The project wraps art, parody, and beauty to format new and radical notions of how we can function as individuals and as a society, including an overview of the Worker Transit Authority (WTA), the Consumer Transit System (CTS) & the Bicycle-centric Approach to Planning (BcAP).

The exhibits include interactive maps, brochures, surveys, drawings, sculptures, videos and text.

 

Bill Mackey of Worker, Inc. will present events that incorporate performance, graphics, and data in a participatory manner designed to facilitate discussion among the community.

Collaborators include Jeffrey Buesing, Ben Olmstead, Peter Wilke, Tyler Jorgenson, Dwight Metzger, Cook Signs, Ron and Patricia Schwabe, and the Apparatchiks.

For further information, visit www.workertransitauthority.com from your PC or mobile device and get involved. Feel free to ‘take the survey’ on our homepage.

Funded through the Tucson Pima Arts Council / Kresge Arts in Tucson ll: P.L.A.C.E. Initiative Grants. In kind support from Reproductions Inc., Peach Properties, Organic Kitchen & Zocalo Magazine. Letters of support from City of Tucson Department of Transit, City of Tucson Ward I and VI, Living Streets Alliance, Downtown Partnership, Drachman Institute, Department of Geography University of Arizona, College of Architecture University of Arizona, City of Tucson Office of Conservation & Sustainable Development.

 

Worker Inc. is a company that specializes in exploring the human connections to the built environment, bridging the theory and practice of architecture, the social sciences, planning and art. Since 2009, Worker Inc. has been instrumental in the production of community exhibits – Downtown Tucson Master Plans, Food Paper Alcohol, and You Are Here. The exhibits combine ART + PLANNING, creating a unique platform that is an act of discovery for the community. Visit www.workerincorporated.com for more information about Bill Mackey and Worker, Inc.

Bill Mackey 520.664.4847 workerarchitect(at)yahoo.com

ST April Meeting – Can Tucson Feed Itself?

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Downtown (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

Can Tucson Feed Itself ?

The short answer is no.
The longer answer will surprise and excite you.
The real answer is – its time to start.

At this Sustainable Tucson meeting, find out:

How food actually gets to your table (Dude – Who brought my lunch?)
How many different Tucson groups are now providing us with fresh, nutritious food
What Tucson would be like if we commit to having a reliable and healthy food supply

Find ways to act for yourself, your family, and Tucson.
Come to the Sustainable Tucson meeting this Monday.

Doors open at 5:30 pm.
The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

Prepare for this important topic by viewing videos and seeing reports on the impacts of climate change on global food security at this website.

Menu for the Future discussion course – Thursdays starting May 3

Six Thursdays, May 3 to June 7, in Tucson AZ

 

Menu for the Future

Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture offers Menu for the Future, a 6-session discussion course prepared by the Northwest Earth Institute that analyzes the connection between food and sustainability.

The goals of the course are to explore food systems and their impact on culture, society, and ecology; to gain insight into agricultural and individual practices that promote personal and ecological well-being; and to consider your role in creating or supporting sustainable food systems.

Topics covered include:

  • What’s Eating America (explores the effects of modern industrial eating habits on culture, society and ecological systems).
  • Anonymous Food (considers the ecological and economic impacts that have accompanied the changes in how we grow and prepare food).
  • Farming for the Future (examines emerging food system alternatives, highlighting sustainable growing practices, the benefits of small farms and urban food production, and how individuals can make choices that lead to a more sustainable food supply).
  • You Are What You Eat (considers the influences that shape our choices and food policies from the fields to Capitol Hill, and the implications for our health and well-being).
  • Toward a Just Food System (explores the role that governments, communities and individuals can play in addressing hunger, equity, and Fair Trade to create a more just food system).
  • Choices for Change (offers inspiration and practical advice in taking steps to create more sustainable food systems).

How it Works:

Prior to each meeting, participants read short selections from the course book relating to one of the topics listed above (book is provided as part of class fee). Each gathering consists of open conversation regarding the readings. Dialogue from a wide range of perspectives and learning through self-discovery are encouraged. While each session is facilitated by one of the course participants, there is no formal teacher.

The Details:

  • Dates/Time: Weekly meetings occur each Thursday, May 3 to June 7, from 6:30 to 8pm. Participants must attend all sessions.
  • Location: central Tucson.
  • Cost (for course book): $25 BASA members, $30 non-members (or $45 for course and a one-year BASA membership).
  • Advance registration is required.

Contact Meghan at meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org or 520-331-9821 for additional information or to register.

Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture – www.bajaaz.org

Melissa Diane Smith – GMO Free Project of Tucson – Native Seeds/SEARCH Salon – May 21

at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N Campbell Ave, Tucson

 

Native Seeds/SEARCH – Free Monthly Salon – A little something for anyone who has ever wielded a fork or pitchfork. Bring your juiciest ideas and appetite for mind-watering conversations.

May 21 Monday 5:30 to 7:30 pm

Melissa Diane Smith, nutritionist, author and Director of Education for the GMO Free Project of Tucson, will discuss what we can do to assure our food supply is GMO free. She will also show a short film, “Hidden Dangers in Kids’ Meals.”

www.nativeseeds.org

Desert Terroir with Gary Paul Nabhan – Native Seeds/SEARCH Monthly Salon – April 16

at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N Campbell Ave, Tucson

 

Native Seeds/SEARCH – Free Monthly Salon – A little something for anyone who has ever wielded a fork or pitchfork. Bring your juiciest ideas and appetite for mind-watering conversations.

April 16 Monday 5:30 to 7:30 pm

Gary Paul Nabhan, one of the founders of Native Seeds/SEARCH, will discuss his new book Desert Terroir, Exploring the Unique Flavors and Sundry Places of the Borderlands. Gary is an internationally-celebrated nature writer, seed saver, conservation biologist, and sustainable agriculture activist who has been called “the father of the local food movement” by Mother Earth News.

www.nativeseeds.org

Revenge of the Electric Car – Pima County Public Library – free showings in March

Now Showing at Your Library! – Revenge of the Electric Car

Pima County Public Library – free showings around Tucson in March…

Here’s your chance to watch and discuss the film Revenge of the Electric Car at a Community Cinema screening event.

Director Chris Paine on Revenge of the Electric Car: “Sometimes change, like a train in the old West, gets stopped dead in its tracks. That was the story of Who Killed the Electric Car? The villains were the same guys who always hold things up when real progress is in the air. Pistol-waving business lobbyists fighting for their old monopolies, simpleton leaders defending the status quo, and the tendency for most of us to stay in our seats rather then board new trains.”

Filmmaker Chris Paine takes his film crew behind the closed doors of Nissan, GM, and the Silicon Valley start-up Tesla Motors to chronicle the story of the global resurgence of electric cars. Without using a single drop of foreign oil, this new generation of car is America’s future: fast, furious, and cleaner than ever.

Following each screening, there will be an opportunity to explore the social issues raised in the films through facilitated discussions or special guest speakers.

Door prizes will be given to the first 5 people attending the screening.

Saturday, March 17, 2012
1:30pm – 3:00pm
Woods Memorial Branch Library

Saturday, March 17, 2012
3:30pm – 5:00pm
Miller-Golf Links Branch Library

Monday, March 19, 2012
4:00pm – 6:00pm
Mission Branch Library

Friday, March 23, 2012
2:00pm – 4:00pm
Joyner-Green Valley Branch Library

This event is a collaborative effort between Independent Television Service Community Cinema, PBS Independent Lens, Arizona Public Media, and Pima County Public Library’s Now Showing at Your Library documentary film series.

Brown Bag Lunch Seminars – Water Resources Research Center – March & April

Unless otherwise noted, all seminars are held at the Sol Resnick Conference Room, Water Resources Research Center, 350 N Campbell Ave, Tucson AZ 85721

Contact: Jane Cripps jcripps(at)cals.arizona.edu or 520-621-2526
http://cals.arizona.edu/azwater

 

WRRC Brown Bag Lunch Seminars

 

Wednesday, March 21, 12:00 – 1:30 pm

Gardenroots: The Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona Garden Project

Speaker: Monica Ramirez-Andreotta, PhD Candidate, Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science, University of Arizona

Project web link is: http://garden-roots.org/

 

Tuesday, April 10, 12:00 – 1:30 pm

Biofuel Production and Water in the Southwest

Speaker: Kim Ogden, Professor, UA Department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering

The Southwest is under consideration for production of fuel from plants and algae due to the long days and ample sunlight. However, water is an issue for sustainable production. This presentation will focus on the potential for using algae and sweet sorghum as feedstocks for biofuels in the Southwest. Strategies for reducing water usage, recycling water and using wastewater for cultivation will be highlighted.

 

Thursday, April 19, 12:00 – 1:30 pm

Valuing the multi-benefits of the Murray-Darling Basin Plan using an ecosystem service framework

Speaker: Rosalind Bark, PhD, CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, Australia

The Murray-Darling Basin Plan aims to maximise the benefits of river reform to the Australian public. Valuing the benefits from changed flow and inundation regimes under the Basin Plan requires linking ecological outcomes and economic valuation. An ecosystem service framework is used as the bridge between ecological sciences and economic valuation.

 

The views, opinions, advice or other content expressed by the author(s) or speaker(s) are their own and do not represent those of the Water Resources Research Center.

A Sweet Grass Braid of Connection – March 29

at City of Tucson Northwest Community Center, 2160 N 6th Avenue, Tucson AZ 85705

A Sweet Grass Braid of Connection” Gathering
March 29, 2012 from 6 to 8:30 p.m.

Gathering, Facilitator for Class, Martha Dominguez

It has been my observation in meeting people that community is something needed to have a sense of belonging and connection that is important to the human heart and soul.

As I come from community since my ancestral time being of Maya-Lenca culture I would like to invite you to attend a community seeding of ideas and to have a discussion about how to join efforts as our Mother Earth grows her family and to learn how community can develop. Let’s build a human network to stop individual conceptual ideas and become part of the whole. In communities of my life experience there is always a space for self because we each need space to just be and to center our spirit. For this gathering we will practice different aspects of community it will be interactive. The start will open sharing ideas then we will act to practice being in a community in our neighborhood in the city or else where.

Join us for this gathering of connection and exchange on Thursday March 29, 2012 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Alternative economic price for attending is $10 per person, contact Martha at: marthacd(at)earthlink.net or call 520-822-9302 to confirm your participation, payment can be mailed to Martha Dominguez, 13555 West Sacred Earth Place, Tucson, AZ 85735. Gathering is in limited space to no more than 25 participants so we love to have you with us.

Sustainable Tucson March Meeting – Working Together Toward a Sustainable Community

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Downtown (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

Working Together Toward a Sustainable Community

In Conversation with Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild,
Council Member Regina Romero, and
Council Member Steve Kozachik

We believe that building a sustainable future will take the cooperation and partnering of residents, government, institutions and organizations. It is in this spirit that we are reaching out to the City of Tucson Mayor and Council, and bringing together the City of Tucson, Sustainable Tucson, and the wider public in this discussion and process…

In recent meetings we’ve identified the following broad categories for projects and action steps that will assist our community to move toward a sustainable future: Water, Energy, Waste, Land Use, Climate Change, Food, Economy, Social Justice, and Democracy…

This month’s Sustainable Tucson General Meeting will be an opportunity for the Mayor and Council Members to showcase those areas of interest that we share, and talk about their projects – either in progress or in the planning/visioning stage – which fall under the sustainability banner, and with the intent to build partnerships and work together toward our common goals.

For this meeting, we’ll be using a “Fishbowl” process designed to initiate respectful and informative community dialogues. Too often our public processes end up getting stuck in the win/lose format of debates. The goal of the Fishbowl process is to move beyond rhetoric and get to substance. Instead of winning an argument, issues and evidence are clarified to help everyone gain a deeper understanding.

New perspectives and options that may not have occurred previously can develop, and strident positions tend to soften or break down. Fishbowl dialogs are a wonderful alternative to typical panel presentations that are followed by limited Q&A sessions.

The general outline for the process is to have one more chair than the number of presenters, in a semi-circle at the front of the room, or a circle in the middle of the room with audience members in concentric rings surrounding the Fishbowl. The panelists begin the process by presenting information to the audience – in this case the topic is sustainability.

Following this, members of the audience will be given the opportunity to join in the discussion by sitting in the empty chair. Each “guest” from the audience can take 5 minutes before vacating the chair to allow for another individual to participate.

We invite you to join us in our first Fishbowl conversation with local elected officials.

Doors open at 5:30 pm.
The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

Clean Elections – and other projects – To Stop Climate Change – Feb 22

CLEAN ELECTIONS – AND OTHER PROJECTS – TO STOP CLIMATE CHANGE — Wed, Feb 22, 7 PM, 931 N. 5TH AVE.

Dear Climate Change Activist,

Please join us Wednesday, February 22nd at 7 p.m. at the Quaker Meetinghouse, 931 N.5th Ave., Tucson, to learn more about the Clean Elections Law and ways to use it to stop climate change.

Also learn about our new Action Groups to stop coal burning at TEP’s Irvington plant; the Citizens’ Climate Lobby national carbon fee (tax) and dividend campaign; strengthening Tucson’s new climate change plan; 350.org’s bird-dogging, probably of Congressional District 8 candidates who take fossil fuel money, other election projects, our Neighborhood Sustainability and Climate Change Houseparties, and other ways to use listening and peer support in this fight.

Jim Driscoll and Vince Pawlowski

P.S. Please RSVP to Jim at the National Institute for Peer Support

Jim Driscoll
National Institute for Peer Support (NIPS)
4151 E. Boulder Springs Way
Tucson, AZ 85712
Phone: 520-250-0509
Email: JimDriscoll(at)NIPSPeerSupport.org
Website: www.NIPSPeerSupport.org

Plan Tucson – Urban Design Policy Working Group – Feb 29

Plan Tucson – Smart Growth Focus Area
Redevelopment and Revitalization Policy Working Group

Meeting Invitation for Wednesday February 29, 2012

Subject: Plan Tucson – Redevelopment and Revitalization Policy Working Group Meeting Invitation

Dear Colleague:

We are sending you this invitation because you expressed an interest or were recommended to participate in the Urban Design Policy Working Group. The first meeting will be held on:

Wednesday February 29, 2012
1:30 – 3:30 PM (Check in starting at 1:00 PM)
Sentinel Building, First Floor
320 Commerce Park Loop, Tucson, AZ 85745

Plan Tucson staff will make a brief presentation on the status of Plan Tucson activities and the Working Group schedule. This will be followed with background information and a discussion of current initiatives in Redevelopment and Revitalization. The second part of the meeting will be devoted to a group exercise designed to begin identifying concepts that should be considered in the development of Redevelopment and Revitalization policy for Plan Tucson.

To ensure that we have sufficient material for participants, please RSVP by sending an email to plantucson(at)tucsonaz.gov and include the phrase “Will Attend Redevelopment and Revitalization Policy Working Group” in the subject line. Please include your name and affiliation in the body of the email. There will be no response to this email.

If you have any questions about this meeting or would prefer that someone else from your agency/organization be the primary contact for Plan Tucson, please send an email to plantucson(at)tucsonaz.gov and include the phrase “Redevelopment and Revitalization Policy Working Group Question or Comment” in the subject line, or call María Gayosso at (520) 837-6972.

We value your time, and thank you in advance for participating in the development of Plan Tucson.

Sincerely,

María Gayosso, Project Manager
Plan Tucson Team
City of Tucson Housing and Community Development Department

Walking Away from Empire – Guy McPherson at Antigone Books – March 2

Walking Away from Empire – Guy McPherson at Antigone Books, 411 N. 4th Avenue, Friday, March 2, 7 PM

Guy McPherson will discuss his book, Walking Away from Empire: A Personal Journey.

McPherson was a successful professor by every imperial measure: tenured, published in all the right places, mentoring students who acquired the best jobs in the field. He earned enough to live on a third of his income and still travel as much as he desired throughout the industrialized world. In other words, McPherson was the perfect model of all that is wrong with the United States!

Rather than questioning the system, he was raising minor questions within the system. During the decade of his forties, he awakened to the costs of the nonnegotiable American way of life: obedience at home and oppression abroad. McPherson transformed his life from mainstream ecologist to friend of the earth and social critic.

The reading will be followed by a question and answer period.
Refreshments will be served.

What Are We Planning For? – A New Advocacy Initiative

What Are We Planning For?
A Sustainable Tucson Issues Paper                                                  March 2012

Since Imagine Greater Tucson’s initiating phase began more than three years ago, Sustainable Tucson has been engaged with the IGT Project at many levels, participating in the steering, community values, outreach, and technical committees. Imagine Greater Tucson has consistently requested input and Sustainable Tucson has tried to contribute ideas in order to make IGT a more relevant and successful visioning process for the Tucson region.

The following text summarizes seven key issues which Sustainable Tucson has previously presented and which the IGT process has yet to address. This document concludes with four specific requests to modify the Imagine Greater Tucson Project.

 

1. There has been no step or focus in the IGT process to sensitize and ground the community in the context of the emerging future. The impacts of climate change, resource depletion, food security, water use, conservation of our natural environment and economic and financial crises were all avoided.

Problem:  Without a grounded understanding of the emerging context, how can we realistically connect our values to a preferred future for the region? IGT views the problem of addressing growth as disconnected from the unprecedented challenges facing us. What does it mean to envision the future with our eyes closed and our heads in the sand?

 

2. Every IGT scenario is built on doubling population and the purpose of the visioning process is to determine the preferred way this growth should happen.

Problem: If this doubling of growth does not happen, IGT will have left us less prepared to adapt to any other possible future. Planning on the basis of doubling population growth constrains the investigation of what is best for the Tucson region. Population may or may not grow as current trends are showing (See Appendix A) and far different scenarios follow from those different assumptions. In planning a sustainable future it would be prudent, considering issues of climate change and resource limitations, to be considering population “build out” or planned decrease. A doubling population may make it impossible to decrease carbon emissions enough to limit uncontrollable climate change effects – important since Tucson is frequently described as “ground zero” for the worst effects of global warming.

 

3. IGT is intended to inform the 10-year comprehensive plans of the regional jurisdictions.

Problem: If IGT is only concerned about how we shape and support growth and if growth does not happen in the next decade (See Appendix A), then what value does IGT actually offer to inform the 10-year comprehensive jurisdictional plans? Worse still is the diversion of time and energy away from addressing the coming unprecedented challenges in what may be the most critical decade of our region’s history.

IGT has surveyed the region’s “values” but again not within the present context of changing eras. These survey results can be used by the jurisdictions but they will not reflect the community’s response to what is important in a coming period of unprecedented social, environmental, and economic change. The elephant in the room that IGT does not address is how to restructure our economy without population growth being the primary economic driver.

 

4. The scope of IGT is limited to how we shape the land-uses and infrastructures for the addition of one million future residents. It is true that the existing community was asked what we value and how we should shape this future addition. But existing residents had no option to define what land-use and infrastructure options we want for ourselves.

Problem: How can we define a preferred future without including the desired changes the existing community would like to see in its mix of infrastructures, especially given that becoming more sustainable and resilient requires significant changes in existing systems? Are the existing residents’ needs and preferences for urban form not an important part of the region’s future?

 

5. The impact of debt restructuring and credit availability were not included as key indicators.

Problem: Preparing for growth and preparing for sustainability both require significant public and private investments. How can we plan for change without estimating availability of funding, especially given the unprecedented local and global credit contraction ongoing these past three years. Population increase, development, economic growth, and protecting our natural environment will all be constrained by credit availability.

 

6. Scalability of scenario features was not included as an indicator or evaluative criterion.

Problem: Regional investment capacity is inherently constrained regardless of population growth level. So it is important that for each level of actual growth, a balanced approach is taken to ensure that all infrastructure categories are adequately addressed. If the investment approach is not balanced, some systems become over-built with excess capacity and others suffer with insufficient investment and capacity. Worse yet is the lack of financial planning for maintenance and repair of both existing and newly planned infrastructures. An obvious example of the latter is our crumbling regional and neighborhood roadways described by Pima County officials as  “rapidly deteriorating”.

IGT staff response to the problematic construct of doubling population has been that if this doubling growth doesn’t happen we will simply scale the implementation of the final “preferred” scenario to what actually happens. However, if an infrastructure cannot be “smoothly” or “linearly” scaled, investment in such infrastructure may preclude other critically-needed system choices should growth not happen as projected.

Thus, the scalability value of features in the alternative scenarios should be presented so that community participants can choose their preferred scenario, in part, by the characteristic of scenario features to be scalable or adaptable to lower growth levels.

 

7.  The 3 IGT scenarios  compare indicators with the reference projection or “trend” scenario, not with current conditions.

Problem:  Because the reference scenario is constructed in such a way as to demonstrate the unsustainability of continuing “business as usual”, the alternative future scenarios automatically show “improvement” over the reference scenario.

Not comparing the 3 alternative scenarios to current conditions – conditions that people can experience and verify now – obscures the very real possibility that for important indicators like greenhouse gas emissions, the values will actually get worse not better under what becomes the final “preferred” scenario.

In the case of greenhouse gases, the goal of regional climate change mitigation planning is to reduce emissions by at least 80% below current levels. It would appear these reductions cannot be met by adding population, even at greatly improved infrastructure efficiencies.

 

Bottomline Conclusion:  The intent of the IGT project to educate the community about “smart growth” concepts and how they can be applied to jurisdictional planning is by itself a worthy effort. Unfortunately, this should have happened 10 to 15 years ago when the region was experiencing the pressures of rapid growth.  Further, these concepts have not been re-calibrated to embody new constraints such as current greenhouse gas reduction targets.

The biggest challenge now is: how do we maintain prosperity and quality of life and environment without continuous population growth and how will we adapt to the unprecedented sustainability challenges in the coming decade.

 

We invite other individuals and organizations to join us in requesting that IGT:

 

1) Directly address and facilitate greater regional understanding of the unprecedented challenges which we face including climate change, peak oil, resource depletion, food security, water use, economic crises, and conservation of our natural environment.

2) Augment its future scenarios to include at least one scenario that considers population stabilization or “build-out” at no or low growth levels.

3) Broaden the scope of participant choices to register “optimal population levels“ along with their scenario preferences.

4) Compare indicators of the alternative future scenarios to actual current conditions, not hypothetical projections.

To support and add your endorsement of this proposal, please post a comment below.

 

Appendix A: Evidence that a new era without growth has begun

The IGT Project’s assertions that regional population “is projected to double in the coming decades” or more recently,  “is expected to grow by as many as 1 million people during this century” are misleading and not substantiated by any facts. At recent rates of change, our population would not even double in a hundred years – a timeframe that climate change and resource depletion research indicate would likely be unfavorable for growth.

For many decades up until five years ago, Arizona and the Tucson region did double their populations at rapid rates: every 20 and 35 years respectively. A major task for every jurisdiction was to manage the pressures and impacts of this growth dynamic. But the rapid growth era has ended as we find increasing evidence that the factors governing growth have indeed changed.

For four years, Americans have been moving less, driving less, and in great numbers, walking away from homes worth less than the mortgage obligation.  The 2010 US Census shows that the Tucson region had less population in 2010 than the 1 million 2006 population estimate. CNBC News recently named Tucson, “The Emptiest City in America” because of high apartment and home vacancies. UA economist Marshall Vest recently revealed that the Tucson region lost net population in 2011.

Declining regional home prices have erased ten years of gains and experts conclude that the local housing market will never return to past levels of activity. All of this points to the likelihood of a  “growthless” decade ahead, perhaps even longer.

www.SustainableTucson.org

What Are We Planning For? – A New Advocacy Initiative

A Sustainable Tucson Issues Paper
March 2012

Since Imagine Greater Tucson’s initiating phase began more than three years ago, Sustainable Tucson has been engaged with Imagine Greater Tucson at many levels, participating in the steering, community values, outreach, and technical committees. Imagine Greater Tucson has consistently requested input and Sustainable Tucson has tried to contribute ideas in order to make IGT a more relevant and successful visioning process for the Tucson region. The following text summarizes seven key issues which Sustainable Tucson has previously presented and which the IGT process has yet to address. This document concludes with four specific requests to modify the Imagine Greater Tucson Project…

Go here to read and comment on “What Are We Planning For?

Also see Reconsider RTA Broadway Project – Public press conference – April 30

and the Sustainable Tucson general meeting, ST May Meeting – Prosperity Without Growth – May 14

Hot Chile Recipes – Native Seeds / SEARCH – Free Monthly Salon – Feb 20

at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N. Campbell Road
February 20, Monday 5:30 – 7:30 pm, Free

Native Seeds / SEARCH Monthly Salons – A little something for anyone who has ever wielded a fork or pitchfork. Bring your juiciest ideas and appetite for mind-watering conversations.

Celia Riddle, owner & creator of Hot Flash Chile Products

Celia will demonstrate how you can incorporate her delicious Roasted Green Chile & Red Chile pastes into your recipes, and will have food to sample.

Mole Recipes – Native Seeds / SEARCH – Free Monthly Salon – March 19

at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N. Campbell Road
March 19, Monday 5:30 – 7:30 pm, Free

Amy Schwemm, owner of the Mano y Metate line of tasty and versatile moles

Amy will talk about how she created her moles and ways to use them in your cooking, and of course will provide samples. The varieties include Mole Dulce, Mole Adobo, Mole Verde and Mole Pipian Rojo.

Native Seeds / SEARCH Monthly Salons – A little something for anyone who has ever wielded a fork or pitchfork. Bring your juiciest ideas and appetite for mind-watering conversations.

Citizens’ Climate Lobby Tucson Meeting – January 7th

The Citizens’ Climate Lobby, Tucson Chapter is meeting at 11 am on Saturday at 255 W. University Blvd to join the national chapters’ conference call and discuss local climate lobby plans. If you have any comments before the meeting, please forward them to Vince Pawlowski:  pawlowski (at) ultrasw.com
Reminders for our call on Saturday:

  • Please call  review the individual planning form ( CCLindividplan2012, ) and bring any questions.  This will help the meeting move quickly.
  • If anyone wants to ask a question on the call, please email Vince and he will let Mark know.
  • Link to Mark’s interview: http://citizensclimatelobby.org/video/mark-reynolds  (on our site under press room)

ST January Meeting – Topics and Working Groups for 2012

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library
101 N. Stone, Downtown (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

ST December 2011 Meeting

How do we “green” our homes and neighborhoods?
How do we work together and contribute to each other?
How do we prepare for climate change?

Join us on January 9th to learn of some exciting efforts now underway in your home town to prepare for the challenges ahead.  A half-dozen of the most innovative and effective people in Tucson will distill their ideas for a sustainable Tucson into concise presentations to ignite your own ideas and enthusiasm…

» Karin Uhlich (Tucson City Council) – Re-establishing PRO Neighborhoods
» Bob Cook (NEST, Inc) – Green re-development initiative
» Dan Dorsey (Pima Community College) – Co-op Permaculture projects program
» Winona Smith (Tucson Time Traders) – Time Banking and local communities
» Tres English (Empowering Local Communities) – Secure food supply
» Ron Proctor (Sustainable Tucson) – Mobilizing for climate change

… and we’ll have a review of working group topics and project ideas from discussion tables in the ST December meeting, including

Recycling / Waste management
Composting toilets
Water use
Water harvesting
Solar Hot Water / Energy / Gas
Paradigm change
Land use planning (density, etc.)
Climate Change – Reducing greenhouse gases
Defining sustainability & adopting it legally
Food security

(This is not a complete list and can be added to… please use the comment form for this page!)

Sustainable Tucson is committed to engaging our audience in a participatory process. Following the presentations, we will ask everyone to engage in table discussions focusing on what actions we can take to make Tucson a more vibrant and sustainable community. Actions might be in the form of policy development, support of on-going projects, or the initiation of new projects.

The ideas generated will be used to develop topics and working groups for future Sustainable Tucson meetings, where in-depth presentations and audience discussions will continue. The goal is to create projects and initiatives that we believe will build our resilience as a Desert People.

also see recent 2011 Sustainable Tucson meetings,

ST December Meeting – The Politics of Sustainability
ST November Meeting – Food Security
ST October Meeting – Water Priorities
ST September Meeting – Non-GMO Food
ST August Meeting – Natural Building in the Desert
and an index of past ST Monthly / General Meetings

Doors open at 5:30 pm.
The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

Monthly Salon – Native Seeds / SEARCH

FREE at the Native Seeds/SEARCH Store, 3061 N. Campbell Ave. 85719

Bring your juiciest ideas and appetite for mind-watering conversations. The Salons are held every third Monday of the month, and have a little something for anyone who has ever wielded a fork or pitchfork.

Our Salon on January 16, 2012 will feature Carolyn Niethammer, author of several books including her newest Cooking The Wild Southwest, and Janet Taylor, author of The Healthy Southwest Table. There will be food to sample, they will autograph their books and talk about their recipe research and food writing.

http://www.nativeseeds.org/index.php/events/native-seedssearch-salons

Pima County Food Systems Alliance – Meeting & Potluck – Nov 30

On November 30th (this Wednesday) from 6-8 pm, there will be a large group meeting of the Pima County Food Systems Alliance (PCFSA) with a potluck at the Sam Lena Library (1607 S. 6th Ave, Tucson; call 520.594.5265 for directions)

The Agenda is as follows:

  1. Welcome & Introduction (Nick) (5 min; 6:00-6:05)
  2. Presentation by PCFSA Consultants (Bryn/Lewis) (25 min; 6:05-6:30)
  3. Break & Get Food; Potluck (5 min; 6:30-6:35)
  4. Workgroup Activity (Bryn/Lewis) (1 hour; 6:35-7:35)
  5. Activity: Getting involved in the Policy Process (Jaime) (5 min; 7:35-7:45)
  6. Next Steps (Lewis) (15 min; 7:45-8:00)

Bring your friends & colleagues, plus a taste of your favorite or signature Thanksgiving dish.  And check out our Facebook page!

The Pima County Food Systems Alliance is an open membership network comprised of a variety of groups and individuals—including but not limited to farmers, chefs, restaurants, schools, educators, youth, gardeners, researchers, food banks, health professionals, attorneys, nonprofits, activists, and consumers.  The Alliance works in a collaborative manner to serve as a space to invite discussion and foster learning and education for those who are directly affected by food insecurity, as well as legislative decision makers about food policy.

Tucson Time Traders – at Connect 2 Tucson – Sept 24

We’re starting a local Tucson Timebank soon.  If you’re interested in joining, please pre-register below, and/or contact us by email – timetraders(at)sustainabletucson.org

We will also be at the Connect 2 Tucson – Moving Planet event on September 24 to meet people and give information about time banking.

[ For current information on Tucson Time Traders, please go to
www.sustainabletucson.org/tucson-time-traders ]

What Is A Time Bank?

A TimeBank is a group of people who trade an hour of work for an hour of work.  The time is banked so you can trade accumulated hours with anyone within the network.

TimeBanking is a rapidly growing movement that allows people to trade assistance, and builds healthy communities.

Missions and Values

  • We are all assets.
  • Redefining work – to value whatever it takes to raise healthy children, build strong families, revitalize neighborhoods, make democracy work, advance social justice, make the planet sustainable.
  • Reciprocity – “How can I help you?” becomes “How can we help each other build the world we both will live in?”
  • We need each other – Networks are stronger than individuals.  People help each other reweave communities of support, strength and trust.
  • Respect – Every human being matters.

Intrigued?
Contact us by email – timetraders(at)sustainabletucson.org

TUCSON TIME TRADERS
Building Tucson’s Empowerment Network 1 Hour at a Time

The Story of Stuff, and more!

Q: Why should I care about the Citizens united v. FEC ruling?
A: In this landmark case, the U.S. Supreme Court decided that it is unconstitutional to limit how much money corporations can spend to influence elections. Why? They said limits would violate the First Amendment guarantee of free speech. Since the 2010 ruling, corporations have spent $300 million to influence election results. This money has been used to run ads and engage in other activities to sway us – the voters– to support candidates who serve the interests of those corporations. Since the interests of corporations rarely match up with the interests of individuals like you and me, that’s a real concern!

View this informative and entertaining little film here.

 

Watch “The Story of Cap & Trade”

200x57_capandtrade copy

The Story of Cap & Trade is a fast-paced, fact-filled look at the leading climate solution being discussed at Copenhagen and on Capitol Hill. Host Annie Leonard introduces the energy traders and Wall Street financiers at the heart of this scheme and reveals the “devils in the details” in current cap and trade proposals: free permits to big polluters, fake offsets and distraction from what’s really required to tackle the climate crisis. If you’ve heard about cap and trade, but aren’t sure how it works (or who benefits), this is the film for you. Find about it here: http://www.storyofcapandtrade.org.

 

And what about bottled water?

And, after you’ve seen this one, you might want to see what they have to say about the story of bottled water at http://www.storyof stuff.org/bottledwater/

217x188_bottledwater_border

 

Watch “The Story of Stuff”

The Story of Stuff is a wonderful online video about sustainable production and consumption, a culture of practices we don’t see very much of yet. In addition to the suggested “10 Little and Big Things You Can Do”, there is a pressing need for organized, coordinated action at the grassroots level. This is why Sustainable Tucson is so important. Watch “The Story of Stuff” here.

Quantifying and Analyzing Sustainability: Modeling Sustainable Solutions (tech/science)

JANUARY Meeting –Organizing questions:

How large a population can Tucson/Pima County support in a sustainable manner, providing our needs from local capacity? (e.i., without importing energy, water, food, and other resources from outside the region)
Do we have a good database model of resources in and out of Tucson?
What is sustainability for a community? Is it self-sufficiency?
Where is the “sweet spot” on a graph where desired quality crosses with minimum resource usage?
What does the ongoing process of an evolving sustainability plan entail?
Do we understand the mathematics of sustainability under uncertainty?
How are we addressing the possibility of this meltdown being “evolutionary in scope” such that what is happening is outside our normal learned perspective of life?
At what point will we stop talking and begin taking action?

Group Discussion

Can we come up with a set of data that shows how, in terms of numbers, we use resources in Tucson so we can create an input/output matrix for life resources, not just money?
To be sustainable is not optional – being unsustainable leads to death!
We need to define the root problems. Sometimes people view implementing solutions as if the solution is the main problem.
People are not fully aware of what it takes to be able to live in Tucson.
What needs to be done: Take a bioregional perspective, calculate carrying capacity, and determine environmental, social, and economic assets to build from and to see what’s missing.
The problem is undefined. What is the problem we are trying to solve?
What are we trying to sustain? Environment, quality of life, economic growth.
Collect data, formulate analysis.
We need to define sustainable population (range or number) for this region.
Does sustainability evolve? Have we always been sustainable?
Is sustainable a “zero-sum problem”, i.e., Is there a fixed resource pie so that more resources on one side makes fewer resources on another? For example, does increased population mean less water for each person.
What is consensus of problem definition we need to solve?
Scientific problem-solving requires analysis of data.
Sustainability is avoiding disastrous consequence of growth.
Are we sustainable if we use money to buy our life-support from outside Pima County?
Part of problem is people do not have a good idea of how much of a resource is needed to sustain their lives in Tucson. Also where do these resources come from? For example, where does our food come from?
Can we create a model so people can “see” the use of resources and make decisions based on data about possible trade-offs? For example, Does rainwater harvesting to water gardens plants reduce stream flows to downstream riparian areas, wildlife, and communities? We currently have no data?
How can we address this need for data and understanding?
What data do we need to collect to define “sustainable” for each life quality or resource? We need an input/output model for local and imported life-support resources – what comes in, what is used here, what goes out?
What is optimal size region for sustainability? USA, Pima County, Tucson?
Water is one measure of sustainability limits.

Main points:

1) What are we trying to sustain? Environment, quality of life, economic growth.
2) Sustainability is avoiding disastrous consequence of growth.
3) Part of problem is people do not have a good idea of how much of a resource is needed to sustain their lives in Tucson. Also where do these resources come from?
4) How can we address this need for data and understanding?
5) What data do we need to collect to define “sustainable” for each life quality or resource?
6) What is optimal size region for sustainability?

FEBRUARY General meeting — Discussion and Who else needs to be involved/invited?

What resources does it take to sustain our current Pima County population for water , food, shelter & livelihood and where do thses resources come from?
What is the carrying capacity of Pima County
How much electric-generation from roof tops in Tucson?
How much roof-water could come from Tucson?
How much water needs to go into the ground?
How much water comes in, gets used, and goes out of Pima County?
How much ag/food development needed to support population/ eco base
What is the measure of an economic base that indicates “enough” jobs or development for the population? Solar panel production, green retrofitting

Who needs to be invited?
Biosphere II, UA departments, Pima County Gov, Huckleberry, Board of Supes, PC P&Z, TREO

Food

JANUARY Organizing Questions & Notes:

* How do we coordinate cooperation and support between people and groups involved in local small scale food production?
* Is it possible to have rainwater harvesting on every home in Tucson? Are community gardens in the future?
* How can we get fast food places to use recyclable containers?
What plants make sense for us to grow (on a large scale) to reduce trucking in groceries from great distances?
* I see a lack of recycling and a lack of composting.
* What thoughts and questions come up with the following question: “Who is your farmer?”
* How can food production address urban poverty, local resource replenishment and civic engagement?

* See what needs to be done: Education about food choices since many scientists/experts believe the single most impactful action an individual can take to mitigate climate change and halt global warming is a vegetarian diet and that animal agriculture is the largest contributor of (to) global warming and climate change. How do we educate the public on a massive scale of this info since it seems most people are not aware of this.

Who should be involved in the sustainability Discussion?
Community Gardens
City of Tucson
County
Available spaces to allocate
School Gardens, Church
Existing Gardens
Example Sonoran Kitchen Gardens

Discovery needed on existing organizations
Local Food Production
Green Jobs
Research Gardens elsewhere as models
Pea Patch City Wide
Hydroponics
C.S.A.s
City Mercado
Centralize Listing of Local Produce
Coalition of Food Growers

Other Thoughts
Education
Ecology of food to create sustainable health
How to grow food
Educate Public on food choices
Vote with our choices
Connecting children with Food Produciton
Law that prevents children from receiving garden produce to eat at school.
Resources – animal agriculture
Veg/Meat – common threads to unite groups
Recyclable containers – Education
Status of this issue – how many participating?
Contact neighborhood organizations; ie 4th Ave
What plants should we grow to discourage trucking of produce?

FEBRUARY General Meeting — Who else needs to be involved/invited?

Who is not here?
CSAs Phillipe
Native Seeds
Brad Lancaster
Desert harvesters
Community Food Bank Varga garland
Tucson originals:
TUSD  School Gradens
Feast, Pastische, Local Harvest

Environmental mapping: toxic places Habitatmap.org
Community Gardens
Southside gardening empowerment group
GMO’s—eliminate, desirable?
Bill of rights for pure food
Eliminating Transfats
Sustainable Diet/City Diet/ artificial food?
Chlorine in water/safe?

February Meeting at Coffee Exchange

Summary of meeting:
——————————–
* Plan for next meeting discussed: Tentative agreement was to try to move meetings to the 3rd Thursday of the month, around 5:30-7:30 PM at the Woods Library (1st and Prince)
Barry and Judith will coordinate on arrangements and surveying all members who were not present to ensure that works for the majority, as well as that the space is available.

* We discussed the goals of our group.. seems to be 3-fold:
1) Achieve sketch/outline for Sustainable Tucson’s Earth Day deadline for a presentation (which Barry sent more info about earlier)…. using the framing questions provided so far, as well as what further clarification comes from the next General Meeting. 2) Plan to flesh out more details over the next year through Sustainable Tucson’s more detailed process (more info to come).
3) Identify any actions or projects we’re interested in pursuing, and how to best do so (individually and/or collectively).
(Many are hinted at in items in the attached sketch)

* We started solidifying our sketch (goal 1) by answering “What needs to be done to create a food-Sustainable Tucson?” (ie: what if the trucks were to stop rolling in? Or if we expect they will in the next 10 years?)
– Carla (I) took down all ideas discussed on laptop notes — that’s what the below comment on Feb. 21 is.
– Many details began to be mentioned that would further each of these ideas/items beyond what could be taken down for the outline… , like lists of books, organizations, people to connect with, etc… those are referred to as future action items needed … like resource mapping, community networking that we will plan for at next meetings, or other resource creation (like a bibliogroaphy of recommended reading to post online) … individuals can work on these as time allows, in the meantime.

As you think of more, keep notes and either email them, or bring them to the next meeting and we can work them in.

ALSO See “Food & Agrigculture” resources under “Topics in Focus” in top navigation