Tucson’s Complete Streets Policy

On February 5th, the Tucson City Council passed Ordinance 11621 – The City of Tucson Complete Streets Policy. What’s in the Complete Streets Policy? How was it created? What does it mean? How will it affect the future of Tucson? At our next meeting, we are going to answer these questions and more. We’ll look at the details of the new policy and how it was created. We’ll also have some expert opinion about how the policy will be implemented. Be sure to join us and get a glimpse of the future of Tucson!

Tuesday, March 12, 2019 from 6-8 pm at the Ward 6 community room. Doors open at 5:30.

Advocacy 101 – Working with our government

RSVP

The 2019 Arizona State Legislature session is well underway, with legislators introducing bills that will, if passed, have significant impact on our lives and our rights. At the federal level, the new Congress is hard at work, and locally both City Council and County Board of Supervisors deal with matters of direct interest to our community. At all levels, it’s vitally important to make our voices heard on important issues that we care about and that affect us all.

Join Sustainable Tucson at our February Monthly Meeting for Advocacy 101, an evening of training and tips on effective ways to reach out to elected officials, focusing primarily on the State Legislature, with lessons learned that can apply equally well at the local or national level. Presenters from League of Women Voters Greater Tucson will give an overview of the state legislative process and provide details about the Request to Speak (RTS) process, an easy but effective way to communicate your position on proposed bills as they are reviewed in committee. Then Jana Segal, Sustainable Tucson’s Advocacy Chair, will present a description of ST advocacy and policy efforts and how you can (and should) get involved.

Along with an overview of RTS, the LWVGT presenters will teach us how to sign up for an online account to use the system. If you bring your laptop, phone, or whatever you use to connect to the Internet, you’ll be able to sign up right then and there. Alternatively, you’ll learn how to sign up online at home or where to go in Tucson to sign up.

This evening’s program is the first in a series that Sustainable Tucson will be presenting on effective communication with our elected officials — and with those who aspire to be elected. We’ll be looking ahead and getting prepared for communicating to candidates for the City Council elections this fall, and then for elections at multiple levels in 2020.

Tuesday, February 12
Doors open 5:30 pm; program starts at 6:00 pm.
Ward 6 Council Office, 3202 E. 1st Street

WHAT’S UP WITH THE PROPOSED ROSEMONT MINE?

Sustainable Tucson’s October meeting

Sustainable Tucson’s October meeting

 

6:00 – 8:00 PM, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018

(Doors open at 5:30 p.m.)

Tucson City Council Ward 6

3202 East 1st Street · Tucson, AZ

If you’ve been looking at the newspaper recently, you will have seen an op-ed from the Tucson Chamber of Commerce saying that it is time for us all to stop “fighting” and for the Rosemont mine to start. That was followed by a number of letters to the editor that clearly explained why the mine is a really bad deal for southern Arizona.

In this talk Gayle Hartmann, president of Save the Scenic Santa Ritas, will bring you up to date on what is happening and what is likely to happen in the near future. We’ll also screen a documentary about the Rosemont Mine by Frances Causey: “Ours Is The Land” is the new short film that depicts in moving and powerful detail the spiritual, cultural, and physical connection of the Tohono O’odham people of Arizona to Ce:wi Duag or the Santa Rita Mountains which are imperiled by the proposed creation of the mile-wide, half-mile deep Rosemont open pit copper mine. Desecrating this revered area with a mine would fundamentally alter the cultural landscape of the Tohono O’odham nation.

 

Sustainable Tucson at TENWEST!

At 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. on Sunday, October 14th, look for our tents at Discover Local Day in the Tucson Museum of Art Courtyard. “Discover Local Sustainability” Fun activities for all ages that show how our desert town can flourish in the future. Activities include:

  1. “Design your Neighborhood”: Create a walkable, inviting neighborhood from a typical Tucson neighborhood map using movable pieces that represent elements of complete streets. (Model built by Changemaker High School students.)
  2.  “Planning Tucson’s Future”: Draw your ideas of what we can do now to make Tucson a great place to live in 2038.
  3. “Understanding Our Groundwater”: Nothing is more important in the desert than water and the water we use in Tucson comes from underground. Understand how this works with an interactive groundwater model from Arizona Project Wet.
  4. “Note to the Future” letter-writing activity. Adult participants will be prompted to write a letter to a young person to be read 20 years from now, and young people will be prompted to write to a parent or other elder, looking ahead 20 years.
  5. “Tales of the Future”: Attendees will be inspired to tell their own 2-3 minute stories on their vision for a sustainable future for Tucson. The show will be hosted by local comedian Jeremy Segal.

 

TACTICAL URBANISM BLOCK PARTY

From 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. on Saturday, October 20th, you can find our tent at Sixth Avenue and Seventh Street (near EXO coffee.) “Design your Neighborhood” and “Understanding Our Groundwater” activities. Volunteers with vehicles needed to transport tables and activities. For more information call Jana at 325-9175.

SHADE FOR TUCSON

September Sustainable Tucson Monthly Meeting

Tuesday, September 11, 2018     

One of the simplest and most pleasing ways we can adapt to climate change, while mitigating its effects, is to reforest our world. Globally, trees are dying off. But cities across the country are working to reverse this trend. Tucson is one of those cities. The goal: a shade canopy of 20% (we’re currently at 8%) by 2030.

At this Sustainable Tucson meeting, you can learn about the Shade for Tucson campaign, led by a network of non-profits who are reaching out to businesses, government agencies, and community groups to join in this massive effort. After brief presentations, leaders in this campaign will engage in conversation with all present as we envision and plan for the planting and care of one million trees across the city. Panelists include Tom Ellis, Executive Director, Tucson Clean and Beautiful; Katie Gannon, Program Director, Trees for Tucson; Kendall Kroesen, Community Outreach Coordinator, Mission Garden; and Tanya Quist, Director, UA Campus Arboretum.

Doors open 5:30 pm   Program starts 6:00 pm   

Ward 6 City Council Office  3202 E 1st Street

 

 

What’s the future of energy for Tucson?


Solar power. Wind energy. Hydroelectric. Geothermal. Nuclear power. What are the alternatives to our fossil fuel addiction? How can we implement them? What are the advantages? What are the challenges?

There are a lot of questions about transitioning to alternative energy. Join us at the next Sustainable Tucson meeting as we explore the options. We’ll start off with a movie program that highlights some of the issues and then welcome a panel of local experts to discuss the topic and answer your questions. It promises to be a stimulating and informative evening.

The panelists for the evening:

  • Duane Ediger, Technicians for Sustainability
  • Michael Peel, Local First Arizona
  • Russell Lowes, Sierra Club Rincon Group
  • Jeff Yockey, TEP Resource Planning Manager
  • John Eisele will be able to represent Tucson 2030 District

In addition, we will present two short videos that gives important context for the discussion:

  1. National Geographic Renewable Energy 101 (3:16). May seem elementary to our audience, but it does provide some basic organizers. Suggestion: introduce it as a primer/reminder, a kind of warm-up for what follows.
  2. Global Weirding Series Renewable energy is way too expensive, right? (6:27). Katharine Hayhoe rocks, modeling what activists want to be able to do: understand and be ready for the scoffing remarks of status quotists . . . with a smile
  3. What is a Zero Energy Building?
  4. 12 steps to net zero. Conserving heat is a big piece of the puzzle in Puget Sound, but the concepts are applicable here

What’s in store for Tucson? Find out at the next Sustainable Tucson meeting:
August 14, 2018
Ward 6 • 3202 E 1st St
6:00 (Doors open at 5:30)

Complete Streets, Connecting Complete Neighborhoods, Creating a Complete City

New construction is popping up all over Tucson: widening roads, new hotels and apartment complexes, and development of some of our most treasured architectural icons. At the same time, Tucson’s bicycle and pedestrian fatalities are on the rise. In recognition of the opportunities and problems, Ward 6 will be hosting a Complete Streets planning session on July 25th at 5:30 pm (see below).

In preparation for this meeting and to discuss the ramifications of some of the many development projects in the works or being proposed, we will be hosting a Complete Streets Primer at our July meeting (July 10 at 6 pm). Join us in thinking about



this topic in a broad and comprehensive way, including access to friends, neighbors, jobs, urban food production, services, resources, and entertainment in ways we can afford and that produce a lot less CO2.
We’ll present a selection of informative videos, followed by a discussion to envision building complete streets, complete neighborhoods, and a complete city in Tucson.

July 10, 6:00 pm (doors open 5:30 pm)
Ward 6, 3202 E. 1st Street

NOTE: Ward 6 no longer allows food or drink in the Community Room, so we can no longer provide refreshments at our meetings.

If you want to see what you missed, here are the videos we showed:

Do you eat? – Tucson’s Local Food Systems

One of the reasons Tucson is recognized as a UN City of Gastronomy is that we have continuously grown and eaten local food for over 4000 years. We are also at the crossroads of many cultures and major climate zones, and have developed a unique culinary history. And we have dozens of local groups that are working to build a strong food system that provides delicious food, cuts down on food waste, and supports local economy, local farmers, community, and much more.

The May and June Sustainable Tucson meetings will begin to explore what we are already doing to make a vibrant and delicious local food system, and what we need to do to make Tucson more resilient and sustainable in food.

May is Movie Night. We’ll feature a wide variety of short videos on the Tucson local food scene — growing, distributing, eating, and sharing delicious local food. These shorts will feature local organizations and food heroes. Follow-up discussion will include how we can use food to build community and the local economy.

June will feature a potluck that (if you bring it) will feature a lot of locally sourced ingredients, with (planned) demonstrations of delicious food you can harvest from your own neighborhood (and yard), and presentations by local groups working to ensure food security in their communities.

Join us and prepare to share the abundance of our desert home.

Tuesday, May 8, 2018
6:00, Ward 6, 3202 E 1st St (doors open at 5:30)

Sustainable Tucson is supporting this. You can too.

This letter begins:

“We ask Tucson Electric Power (TEP) for the following:

  • Plan for seven generations of ecological recovery.
  • Expedite the replacement of fossil fuels with clean renewable energy enriched by energy storage.
  • Start in Tucson with the Irvington H. Wilson Sundt Generating Station (IGS).”

If you want to find out more (And you really should),
then check out
<SIGN THIS LETTER>

You can sign it too.

Sustainable Water – A mirage or our future?


At this month’s Sustainable Tucson meeting we will continue our investigation of water sustainability in Tucson.

A five person panel of water experts from academia, government, and the community will present their viewpoints about what water sustainability means in Tucson and how we can achieve that goal. There will be a moderated question session and then we will open the discussion up to the audience.

There’s nothing more important to life in the desert than water, so be sure to join us for this fascinating and essential discussion.

Tuesday, April 10, 2018
6:00 pm (Doors open at 5:30)
Ward 6, 3202 E 1st St

Start the year right – with Friends and Action

What delicious food would you like to share with other STers? We’re looking forward to sharing good food with you at a potluck dinner at the next Sustainable Tucson meeting on January 9.

The January Sustainable Tucson meeting will be a working potluck dinner. Our goal is to get to know one another, and to start to develop the ST working groups.

In 2018 we will continue to provide excellent information programs. But it is time make sustainability the agenda that drives public policy, the local economy, and private actions. Beginning on January 9, we are forming working groups that will:

  • Organize important meetings on ways to make Tucson more sustainable
  • Help you advocate for sustainable public policies, local businesses and private actions
  • Expand the reach of Sustainable Tucson and “get the word out” about our sustainable future
  • Help you work with your neighbors so we can all create that “village” where we work together to create the beautiful and resilient future we all seek

We are starting now, and you can help make it happen. We need your help to make it happen

Join us for a delicious potluck. Bring something to share and your own tableware. We particularly hope you will look for local ingredients, since local food is critical to creating our sustainable future. You can check out farmers markets near you thru this Edible Baja Arizona list

We know 2018 will be an exciting year. Kick it off the right way – working with friends to create our sustainable future together.

Happy New Year.

January 9 Sustainable Tucson meeting
Working potluck dinner
Ward 6 office, 3202 E 1st
Starts at 6:00 (doors open at 5:30).

Aug 11, 2017 Jonathan Overpeck Interview

Here’s the UA’s former Institute for the Environment  Director Jonathan Overpeck in his final interview with Metro Week. The August 11 program in which this interview was aired no longer appears on the UA’s podcast site for MetroWeek. Due to size limitations this 10 minute clip is presented in low resolution.

LowResOverpeck

 

 

July Workshop
What are our best opportunities for action?
What’s next? How do we get governments, businesses, financial organizations, educational institutions, and just plan folk to work together to make Tucson more sustainable and resilient?

One answer is to know what we want … and then talk “amongst ourselves” – every chance we get.

Come to the next Sustainable Tucson meeting, July 11 at Ward 6 office from 6-9pm, and help create the next step in developing “Principles for Our Sustainable Future”. Please register now, so we know how many people to plan for and can provide additional materials for next Tuesday’s meeting.

At this workshop, we will build on the principles developed at the June Sustainable Tucson meeting. These principles were developed by over 40 people in a 3 hour workshop and cover five areas – water, transportation, local jobs and businesses, green redevelopment, and financing.

At the July workshop, you will help identify overlaps and connections between these principles and then craft community-wide opportunities that the City of Tucson could help promote. (Example connection)

The results of this meeting will guide our City Council Candidates forum on August 9. The goal will be to identify 4-6 such opportunities and ask the City Council Candidates to discuss the City’s role in making Tucson more resilient and sustainable, using these opportunities as examples. These principles and connections may also be used in candidate forums for the Board of Supervisors, next year.

This should be a fun evening. You will be working with other creative and caring Tucsonans who want to make Tucson a better place for all of us. So put on your creative cap, and join in the fun. Register now.

Food, Water, And Traditional Knowledge In Arid Lands

The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences and the Southwest Folklife Alliance are screening a 15-minute documentary — produced by the College of SBS and SFA — titled “Food, Water, and Traditional Knowledge in Arid Lands.” The film emerged from the Food and Water in Arid Lands conference held at the UA this spring.

Following the free film showing — which will be held at the Loft Cinema on April 23 at 2 p.m. — a panel of community experts, including people from the film, will dicuss “Tools for policy, organizing, and action.”

Description of the film
Human beings are putting more stress on our food and water delivery systems than ever before. While some may look to emerging technologies, there is a growing acknowledgement that Traditional Knowledge and Indigenous practices hold tremendous promise for food security in times of population growth, economic inequality, and changing climates.

In this film, practitioners and teachers of Indigenous and Traditional Knowledge from the Southwestern United States and around the globe share their insights on multigenerational, community-based, and culturally-embedded models of food and water sustainability in arid lands.

These models are important for food and water security, but even more, they can also help ensure social justice, economic justice, human rights, and political autonomy across the globe.

Loft Cinema, Sunday April 23, 2:00 pm
Free Admission. Post-film Q &A
https://sbs.arizona.edu/event/film-screening-panel-food-water-and-traditional-knowledge-arid-lands

ACC Public Comment Meeting on Distributed Solar

June 26, 2017, 10:00 am — Arizona Corporation Commission office, 400 W. Congress Street, Room 222

This public meeting will deal with Phase 2 issues of TEP’s Rate Application. Phase 2 will address rate design for solar distributed generation and net metering tariff modifications. The Commissioners need to hear from all of us!

Public Meetings About Proposed Interstate 11- May 2 & 3

Tuesday, May 2 — Arizona Riverpark Inn, 777 W. Cushing Street
Wednesday, May 3 — Marana Middle School, Cafeteria, 11285 W. Grier Road, Marana

The Arizona Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration are hosting public meetings to present corridor alternatives for the proposed interstate 11 between Nogales and Wickenburg.

More information and talking points will be available from Coalition for Sonoran Desert Preservation closer to the meeting date.

Sign-making Workshops — People’s Climate March – Tucson 2017

Come one, come all. You don’t have to be artistic! We will have examples of slogans or bring your own! Bring art supplies or donate them. We will have some too.

Workshop 1
Friday, April 14, 3 pm – 7 pm
Raices Taller 222 Art Gallery and Workshop
218 E. 6th Street
Workshop 2
Thursday, April 20, 5 pm – 8 pm
Ward One Council Office (Regina Romero)
940 W. Alameda Street
Workshop 3
Monday, April 24, 5 pm – 8 pm
Brother John’s Beer, Bourbon, and BBQ
1801 N. Stone Avenue

Tucson Earth Day Festival

Tucson Earth Day Festival

Saturday, April 22, 10:00 am-2:00 pm — Tucson Children’s Museum, 200 S. 6th Avenue

Free and open to the public, with free admission to the Museum all day
Eco-friendly exhibits and hands-on activities — for kids of all ages!

Interested exhibitors can register through April 7.
www.tucsonearthday.org

Case Studies and Cocktails with Tucson Emerging 2030 District

Thursday, April 20, 5:30-7:00 pm — Hotel Congress, 311 E. Congress Street

USGBC Arizona and the Tucson Emerging 2030 District invite you to celebrate Earth Month in Arizona with a tour and networking reception at the historic Hotel Congress.

Learn how Hotel Congress is positioning itself as a leader in energy efficiency and sustainable design through partnership with the 2030 District.

Come and find out how you can get involved.

See details and RSVP to event

Initiatives for Climate-ready, Resilient Buildings – the Emerging Tucson 2030 District and More

2030 Districts are a national network of organizations in 15 cities in North America that are working to reduce building energy, water waste, and carbon transportation emissions by 50% by 2030.

At Sustainable Tucson’s April General Meeting, come hear the update of the Tucson Emerging 2030 District, Tucson’s new Community Partnership to transform our commercial and institutional buildings.

The Tucson Emerging 2030 District continues to evolve, and their executive committee will share their progress and expectations with Sustainable Tucson to describe how far the concept has proceeded since earlier presentations. Learn about the workshops, forums, PCC classes, and community events, which are attracting interest in this important new initiative in Tucson.

After Tres English presents a brief overview of the conditions of our quarter million aging tract homes, the second half of the April General Meeting will feature David Eisenberg, Director of the Development Center for Appropriate Technology.

David will present an overview of what people need to know to embark on the green building journey. This will include information on building codes, building science, green building materials, and reliable sources for further information. If you are interested in the subject of green retrofitting of existing residences or designing and building your own eco-house, this part will be of particular value. David will also describe the potential for green retrofitting Tucson’s vast housing stock built between 1950 and 1990.

• Ward 6, 3202 E 1st St
• Tuesday, April 11, 2017
• 6:00 pm (doors open 5:00)

Food Resilience Project POTLUCK – Next step to resilience and delicious, local food

Join future friends from around Tucson who want to Learn to Grow, Eat and Share lots of delicious local food, at the kickoff Community Potluck of the Food Resilience Project of Feeding Tucson/Sustainable Tucson. The potluck is March 25 from 4:00 to 6:30 near County Club and 22nd.

Find out more at the Food Resilience Project kickoff event . Please bring a dish to share, preferably one made with some local ingredients, either from your own garden or local farmers markets.

Building Resilience by Building Community

How can we build supportive relationships with our neighbors in a world that is fragmented by everything from automobiles to zoning to the internet to globalization? How do we remain secure in a world where we have almost no things stored here (like food) and nearly everything we have is made someplace else in the world and then shipped here, all using fossil fuels?

The March Sustainable Tucson General Meeting is Building Resilience by Building Community. It is the second of our The Opposite of Helpless series. At this Building Resilience program, we will explore many of the ways that Tucsonans are working together to build community and resilience in local food, care for the elderly, education, and climate readiness.

The meeting format is:
* Brief presentations by groups on their current activities and volunteer opportunities
* Panel discussion on how their work can help promote community connections and what Tucson can do to dramatically expand the sort of work they are doing.
* A “Volunteer Fair” so you can find out how to help these organizations, develop a future general meeting program, or develop a Sustainability Agenda for Tucson.

Currently scheduled groups are:
• Food Resilience Project
• Pima Council on Aging’s Neighbors Care Alliance
• Building Resilient Neighborhoods
• Community Food Bank’s Garden program
• Changemaker High School
• Watershed Management Group

Find out how you can get involved, and what we need to do to make Tucson a more Resilient and Sustainable community at the Sustainable Tucson March 14 General Meeting, 6:00 at Ward 6, 3202 E 1st St. (Doors open at 5:30).

Map and directions

Public Dialogue: Intro and Practice Overview

Want to learn how to do a conversation where issue differences can be addressed, shared understanding and actions can be experienced? Come to this overview and potential practice (for any complex public policy issue) using the National Issues Forum Institute methods. Facilitated by NIFI trained and “well-seasoned” practitioner: Anita C. Fonte, Community Renaissance. Co-convened with The Southwest Fair Housing Council.

RSVP recommended due to limited space in the Children’s Meeting Room, first floor.

At:Joel D. Valdez Main Library
101 N Stone Ave, Tucson, Arizona 85701

Pima County and the Next Economy: How Energy Planning Can Recession-Proof Our Region

The Office of Sustainability and Conservation is very excited to announce that local resource economist guru, Skip Laitner, will be our featured speaker for February’s Sustainability Brown Bag! He’ll be discussing his experience as the co-creator of Luxembourg’s strategic economic plan and how Pima County can use features of this plan to create a more energy-efficient, sustainable, and robust economy in the face of imminent uncertainty.

TUCAN – Tucson Climate Action Network monthly meeting

Organizing for the Scientists’ March in Tucson

Meet at: 350Tucson clubhouse, 255 W. University Blvd.
3 blocks west of Stone Ave., 1 block east of Main, south side of the street. On the Third St / Univ. Blvd Bikeway. Stone/University bus stop serves Sun Tran routes 4, 10, 16, and 19, all running till 11:00pm or later

We’ll be organizing for the Scientists’ March in Tucson (April 22) and more.

SCIENCE, NOT SILENCE https://www.marchforscience.com/

The March for Science is a celebration of our passion for science and a call to support and safeguard the scientific community. Recent policy changes have caused heightened worry among scientists, and the incredible and immediate outpouring of support has made clear that these concerns are also shared by hundreds of thousands of people around the world. Mischaracterization of science as a partisan issue, which has given policymakers permission to reject overwhelming evidence, is a critical and urgent matter. It is time for people who support scientific research and evidence-based policies to take a public stand and be counted.

ON APRIL 22, 2017, WE WALK OUT OF THE LAB AND INTO THE STREETS.

“Transformational Solutions for Climate Change Adaptation and Water Sustainability in the Colorado River Basin”

Seminar by UA Center for Climate Adaptation Science & Solutions: “Transformational Solutions for Climate Change Adaptation and Water Sustainability in the Colorado River Basin”

February 8 at 4:30 p.m.

UA Campus, ENR2 Bldg. Room S0107, 1063 E. Ft. Lowell St.

Speaker: Dave White, Professor, School of Community Resources and Development, Arizona State University

Drawing from use-inspired sustainability science and decision making under uncertainty, this talk will address the overarching question: Given environmental and societal uncertainties, how can cities dependent on the Colorado River Basin develop transformational solutions to implement water sustainability transitions? Managing transitions toward urban water sustainability will require innovative approaches to water governance that are anticipatory, adaptable, just, and evidence-supported.

AZ Corporation Commission public hearing in Tucson

The Arizona Corporation Commission has scheduled a public meeting in Tucson on Wednesday 02/08/17 on the TEP and Trico rate cases. ACC press release states the Commission will be voting on rate cases involving Tucson Electric Power and TRICO Electric Cooperative. Read the full press release here.

State office building, 400 W. Congress St., hearing room #218

COMMUNITY VOLUNTEER FAIR

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, President’s Day, 4:30-6:30
THE HISTORIC Y, 300 E. University Blvd.
This is an event:

– for social and environmental activists to connect and engage and learn about the great work that others are doing with whom they may not be so familiar

– for those with little or no experience in activism who are frustrated by the current political climate, and/or who feel inspired by President Obama’s call to action and are looking to get involved, help vulnerable populations and fight for social and environmental justice, equality and liberal progressive causes

– for people feeling disenfranchised looking to engage within a place of love and support

– for social, environmental and political organizations looking for volunteers

This is for those who are looking for ways to get involved, to learn about the many great organizations there are in Tucson and find causes which resonate with them so that they can, in the words of President Obama, ‘hitch their wagon to something bigger than themselves’, affect positive change, and make a difference. Groups will be able to set up tables where they can educate attendees about their missions, objectives, actions and projects and sign up volunteers to do the work that our democracy demands. We hope people find this a great opportunity to meet like-minded people, get inspired, and make meaningful connections. Beer, snacks, and music will add to the convivial atmosphere in our lobby and our lovely courtyard.

More than 40 organizations are being invited to participate in the Fair. They are social, environmental and political, with an emphasis on fighting for equality and social justice and protecting the environment and vulnerable populations and causes.

Organizations that wish to participate or people seeking more information about the event are encouraged to contact Shawn Burke, 415-218-0020, shawnburke@me.com

Following the Fair, there will be additional social time to encourage introductions, collaboration and idea exchange, from 6:30 to 7, as the setting turns from President’s Day to “Not My President’s Day” with the staged reading of “The Higher Education of Khalid Amir,” an award-winning play with Anti-Trump themes by Monica Bauer, beginning at 7:00 at ZUZI! Theater.

Tucson Citizens Climate Lobby

Saturday Jan. 14th 2017 at Grace St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 2331 E Adams St, Tucson, AZ 85719.

Please join our greater Tucson CCL group for our monthly meeting that starts with welcome and coffee at 9:30, our chapter meeting from 10:00 to 11:00am, followed by our international call. Meeting adjourns at 11:45.

This month’s guest is Yoram Bauman, founder of Washington’s carbon tax initiative – yeson732.0rg.

  • What are the lessons we can learn from the defeat of the Washington state carbon tax referendum, Initiative 732?
  • Bauman holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Washington and is known as the “Stand-up Economist.”
  • He is co-author of the 1998 book Tax Shift that helped inspire the revenue-neutral carbon tax in British Columbia.
  • In 2012, he co-authored with Shi-Ling Hsu an op-ed in the New York Times, The Most Sensible Tax of All.

SAz Solar Partnership – ACC and solar customers

Southern Arizona Solar Partnership will discuss what the recent ACC decisions mean for future solar customers. Get your solar questions answered!!

The Southern Arizona Solar Partnership is a group of folks interested in solar: installers, government people, solar customers and those who just want to see more solar in Tucson!! We meet every other month at PAG (1 East Broadway, 4th Floor). Next meeting is Jan 19 at 2:30 pm.

Communicating Climate Change

Our January General Meeting focuses on issues of how we communicate on Climate Change. To stimulate our discussion, we will view selections from a lecture titled “Climate Change in the American Mind,” by Anthony Leiserowitz, the Director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication.

The program includes a reading by Susan Feathers (one of the founders of Sustainable Tucson), from her newly released novel Threshold, which looks at Tucson and the Southwest in the not-so-distant future under the impacts of climate change.

Please join us to be part of the discussion and explore ways in which we can communicate more effectively on this vital issue.

Note new day of the week and new location for 2017 General Meetings.

Tuesday, January 10, 2017
Ward 6 Office, 3202 E 1st St. (one block south of Speedway, one block east of Country Club)
Doors open 5:30 for networking. Program starts 6 pm.

Further References:

Yale Program on Climate Change Communication:

http://climatecommunication.yale.edu

Dr. Anthony Leiserowitz – full March 2015 lecture:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpmcJDr3KX8

Key Climate Scientists

Dr. James Hansen, 2016 lecture

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42wtAennn8w

Dr. Kevin Anderson 2016 Interview

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ck_Ev8oqBh0

COP22: A Multimedia Presentation and Discussion about the UN Climate Talks in Marrakech

Speaker(s):
Remy Franklin, Masters Candidate, School of Geography and Development
Location:
ENR2, Rm S230

School of Geography and Development MA Candidate Remy Franklin tells the story of COP22 from his perspective as an activist and observer with the youth advocacy organization, SustainUS.

Sponsored by the Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice.

Light refreshments will be served at 5:45pm.

UN Conference in Tucson on Food & Water in Arid Lands

A Food and Water Conference, and a Celebration of Place

WHAT: The 2016 ITKI ● UNESCO ● City of Gastronomy Conference in Tucson, Arizona, USA: Food and Water in Arid Lands: Dialogues across Contemporary and Traditional Knowledge

WHEN: Opens on Friday, November 4, 2016 and concludes on Saturday, November 5 at 5pm, followed by a closing celebration to which all are invited. Additional programming before and after the Conference also available for those interested.

WHERE: The Conference will be held on the University of Arizona Campus, largely in the Student Union Memorial Center.

COST: Absolutely free, but registration required. Space is limited. Please join us!

Please join us for this opportunity to learn about efforts across the globe to create sustainable and thoughtful futures informed by place, history, Traditional Knowledge, and other ways of knowing.

As the world undergoes climate change, urban and rural communities in arid lands need effective adaptive strategies for ensuring resilience in the face of increasing environmental variability, changing weather patterns, dwindling water resources, and intensifying strains on food systems and food security. Join us November 4 and 5, 2016 for discussions with expert panelists about their experiences with water management and water scarcity, their work toward just food systems and sovereignty, and their insights on the roles of local knowledge in adaptation and climate change.

In addition to the Conference, panelists, distinguished guests, and attendees are encouraged to join a number of excursions that highlight both the uniqueness of our region’s cultural and food heritage, as well as our unique scientific inquiries into Earth’s living systems. Click here for more on our Friday night dinner and reception with James Beard Award winning Chef Janos Wilder at the Carriage House, and our Sunday morning brunch and programming at the Desert Museum.
For more on Tucson as a ‘culinary capital’:

Tucson becomes an unlikely food star (New York Times, 23 August 2016)
Tucson, Arizona, cultivates its foodie reputation – with a nod from Unesco (The Guardian, 17 July 2016)

Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) Candidate Forum

You’re invited to our next Tucson Energy Group (TEG) Talk which will be an Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) Candidate Forum on Thur (9/29), 5:00 – 7:00 PM in the meeting room at Ermanos (http://www.ermanosbrew.com/). (Interested people under 21 years old can attend!)

Candidates Attending:
Robert “Bob” Burns (www.BobBurns.gop),
Tom Chabin (www.TomChapin.com),
Boyd Dunn (www.BoydDunn.com),
Bill Mundell (www.BillMundell.org ), &
Not yet confirmed:
Andy Tobin (www.AndyTobin.com).

We all know that this 2016 ACC election is critical to Arizona’s future, so I hope that you can join us and distribute this invitation freely to others who might be interested.

The University of Arizona’s Students for Sustainability will be in attendance to register voters during the forum.

Solidarity Rally – resisting the Dakota Access Pipeline

Join Rising Tide Tucson and others for a Solidarity Rally with the water protectors of Standing Rock resisting the Dakota Access Pipeline. We will be gathering on Wednesday September 14th at 4:30 at Bank of America downtown (33 N. Stone, between Congress and Pennington). Bank of America is one of many financial institutions investing in the pipeline. Bring signs showing your solidarity with the indigenous-led resistance and calling out Bank of America for its support of environmental destruction.

Last week, the Red Warrior and Sacred Stone camps issued a call for two weeks of solidarity actions targeting companies responsible for the Dakota Access Pipeline from Sept. 3-17. Let’s make a statement that Tucson stands strong in solidarity with this historic movement.

The proposed pipeline will bring oil from North Dakota to Illinois, crossing the Missouri River near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation, critically endangering water resources for the tribe and desecrating sacred lands containing burial sites and cultural artifacts. The resistance at Standing Rock has brought over a hundred tribes together in a historic display of strength and unity. Bulldozers have already torn up sacred lands, and the people fighting to protect them have been met with pepper spray and attack dogs. Though the Obama administration issued a statement earlier today halting construction in the area until further review, continual pressure is needed to stop this pipeline from becoming a reality.

Tucson Energy Group (TEG) – Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) Candidate Forum

You’re invited to our next Tucson Energy Group (TEG) Talk which will be an Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) Candidate Forum on Thur (9/29), 5:00 – 7:00 PM in the meeting room at Ermanos (http://www.ermanosbrew.com/).

Three of the five candidates (Tom Chabin, Boyd Dunn & Bill Mundell) have already committed to attend, thanks to Robert Bulechek’s help. I have not heard back yet from the other two candidates (Bob Burns & Andy Tobin), but your involvement might still encourage their participation.

Candidates will provide brief individual presentations (under 5 mins.), followed by their answers to written questions and then a moderated discussion with our well-informed audience of area energy professionals.

We all know that this 2016 ACC election is critical to Arizona’s future, so I hope that you can join us and distribute this invitation freely to others who might be interested.

Please RSVP by 9/22, if possible, so we can accommodate everyone who wants to attend. Doug (520-250-2553)

The ABCs of the ACC: A Full Run-down of the Arizona Corporation Commission

We’re all familiar with the role of the ACC in setting our electricity rates. Many of you were probably at the ACC public hearing in Tucson on August 31 and may even have given testimony about TEP’s rate case now before the Commission. But do you know the full range of what the ACC does?

The Arizona Corporation Commission, known as the “4th branch of government in Arizona,” impacts our lives and the economy of the state in many ways — not just our utility rates. This meeting will provide an overview of all aspects of the ACC’s work. In November, we’ll be voting for candidates to fill three seats on the Commission, and this program will help ensure that we’re all informed voters as we make that decision.

Join Sustainable Tucson for our September Monthly Meeting, presented in collaboration with Sierra Club Grand Canyon Chapter. Speakers (confirmed to date) will be Sandy Bahr and Dan Millis.

Meeting Date: September 12, 2016
St. Mark’s Presbyterian Church, in Geneva Hall, at 3809 E. 3rd St. (west of Alvernon, south of Speedway).
Doors open at 5:30 pm; program begins at 6:00 pm
Free parking in the church lots off 2nd St. (preferred) and 3rd St.

Food Resilience — Learning to Adapt, Survive & Thrive in the 21st Century

Of all the things that we could do to make Tucson more resilient — better able to survive and thrive, no matter what the world throws at us — the “lowest hanging fruit” is probably — FOOD. Who woulda thunk it?

Come to the joint meeting of Sustainable Tucson and Ward 3 Neighbors Alliance this coming Monday (June 13 at 6:00) at the Downtown Main Library.

This meeting will focus on what Tucson is already doing to create a beautiful and healthy community that can provide a more secure food supply based on our renewable rainfall, ample land, year-round growing climate, and long tradition of unique local food.

A panel of local experts will discuss what Tucson is already doing that contribute to our food resilience, as well as what we might do to magnify our efforts. The panelists are:
• Nick Henry – Director of the Community Food Bank’s Food Resource Center
• Sarah Brown – Co-coordinator of Watershed Management Group
• Oscar Medina – Changemaker High School teacher in History, Civics, and Urban Agriculture Restorative Ecology
• Carolyn Niethammer – Author on the plants, food, environmet, and people of the Southwest
• Tres English – Director of Sustainable Tucson Food Resilience Project
The panel discussion will be followed by Q&A from the audience.

In addition to the panel, there will be an opportunity to talk with local vendors who are directly involved in local sustainability. Currently confirmed are:
• Tanks Green Stuff
• Iskashitaa Refugee Harvesting Network
• Tucson Organic Gardeners.
• Carolyn Niethammer – Local author on SW food, environment and people

Join us for lively discussion on an important issue facing Tucson.

As always, the doors of the downstairs meeting room open at 5:30 and the program starts promptly at 6:00. Parking is free in the parking garage below the Main Library.

Sustainability and Architecture: USGBC ADVANCE and Tucson’s Prospective 2030 District®

For our May General Meeting, Sustainable Tucson is very pleased to present “Sustainability and Architecture: USGBC ADVANCE and Tucson’s Prospective 2030 District®.” This program will present the innovative partnership between the 2030 Districts and the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)-Arizona Sonoran Branch, with the goal of developing a 2030 District® here in Tucson.

First established in Seattle, 2030 Districts® are unique private/ public partnerships that bring property owners, managers, and developers together with local governments, businesses, and community stakeholders to provide a business model for urban sustainability through collaboration, leveraged financing, and shared resources. Now in 11 other cities across North America, 2030 Districts® are forming to meet the energy, water, and vehicle emissions reduction targets for existing buildings and new construction called for by Architecture 2030 in the 2030 Challenge for Planning.

Here in Tucson, since late January of this year, a growing group of representatives from community environmental organizations, City and County departments, and building professionals have been meeting regularly to explore the development of a 2030 District in Tucson. Initial focus has been on forming a District in the Bonita neighborhood in Menlo Park, but there is also interest in expanding to include downtown Tucson and the U of A. The 2030 Challenge for Planning goals, which need to be adopted to form a District, if successfully met, would result in reducing energy use, water use, and CO2 transportation emissions by 50% District-wide by 2030.

USGBC-Arizona Sonoran Branch members, working together with Architecture 2030 and 2030 Districts® representatives, have formed the Tucson ADVANCE/2030 District Partnership (TADP), in a joint effort to provide free resources and tools such as ENERGY STAR to benchmark, develop, and implement creative strategies, best practices, and verification methods for measuring progress towards the goals of the 2030 Challenge for Planning and the Tucson 2030 District. (See article below for related training event.)

Speakers include:
Peter Dobrovolny: Retired Architect/Planner and 2030 District Advocate. Peter was instrumental in forming the first 2030 District in Seattle and is currently facilitating the exploration of a 2030 District in Tucson
Michael Peel: Community and Government Relations Liaison, Pima Community College. Michael is facilitating the USGBC ADVANCE training that is focused on development of the Tucson ADVANCE Prospective 2030 District.
Ray Clamons: Owner of Xylon Designs Sustainable Architecture & Water Harvesting Landscapes. Ray has produced the concept of the Bonita District – Tucson 2030 District and is currently active in planning for that District.
Joel Loveland: Professor Emeritus University of Washington (UW) School of Architecture and Director, UW Center for Integrated Design; 2030 District Advocate. Joel is currently supporting Peter and Michael in the area of building performance analysis and benchmarking for the emerging 2030 District in Tucson.

Monday, May 9, 2016
Joel D. Valdez Main Library, Lower level Conference room
101 N Stone (lower level parking off Alameda St.)
Program begins at 6:00pm. Doors open at 5:30 for networking.

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS AND YWCA OFFER FREE WORKSHOPS

Is your organization planning to hold a candidate or issue forum this year? If so, you’ll want to attend the free workshops being offered on Saturday, April 30th.

The morning will be devoted to a presentation on how to plan forums, and the afternoon will be on how to moderate forums, with hands-on practice.

Both will be at the YWCA, 525 N. Bonita Avenue. The morning workshop begins at 9 AM, and the afternoon one at 12:30. Light refreshments provided; if you’re staying for the full day, bring a bag lunch or purchase food on site. You can register for one or both workshops at the League’s website at www.lwvgt.org or call 520/327-7652.

“Catching the Sun” New Film Screening

You are invited to a screening of the new film “Catching the Sun” on Friday, April 22nd at 7pm at Casa Video Film Bar at 2905 E Speedway Blvd.

Catching The Sun is a feature length documentary that explores the global race to a clean energy future. The event will be done by donation, as Tucson Solar Punk is fronting the cost for distribution rights. Check out the Trailer at catchingthesun.tv.

The film follows the hope and heartbreak of unemployed American workers seeking jobs in the solar industry, and sheds light on the path to an economically just and environmentally sustainable future. Set against the struggle to build a ‘green economy’, Catching the Sun will engage new audiences in solutions to climate change and income inequality. Please spread the word to others among your networks.

I hope to see you at the theater!

We Need to Electrify As Much Transportation As We Can – Heinberg

We Need to Electrify As Much Transportation As We Can

by Richard Heinberg

Transcript:

JESSICA DESVARIEUX, PRODUCER, TRNN: Welcome to the Real News Network. I’m Jessica Desvarieux in Baltimore.

Folks are lining up to reserve electric car automaker Tesla’s Model 3. It’s considered to be one of the first electric cars for the mass market at an expected price tag of 35 thousand dollars. Tesla’s CEO, Elon Musk, will be unveiling the vehicle on Thursday evening, so we can’t show you what it will actually look like. But in this segment we wanted to get beyond the consumerism and ask, will this be a game changer for the automobile industry in America and the environment?

Now joining us to help us answer that question is Richard Heinberg. He’s a senior fellow at the Post Carbon Institute. Thanks so much for joining us, Richard.

RICHARD HEINBERG: It’s a pleasure, Jessica.

DESVARIEUX: So, Richard, why has it taken so long for an affordable electric car to sort of come to the market? I’m reminded of the 2006 documentary “Who Killed the Electric Car?” which really highlights how we essentially went from having electric cars on California roads in the ’90s to then, eventually, shredding and destroying those very same vehicles years later. So my question to you, Richard, is, who killed the electric car?

HEINBERG: Well, the bosses at the Detroit automakers decided back in the 1990s that there wouldn’t be a mass market for the electric car because of the short range of the vehicles. They thought consumers wouldn’t buy a car if it didn’t have a two to three hundred mile range, and the batteries at that time were not capable of delivering that kind of range. So even though they built some prototypes and sent them out to drivers, they never produced a mass market car.

Today, battery technology has improved enough so that it is possible to produce an electric car for the masses with at least a 200-mile range, and that’s what’s anticipated for the Tesla Model 3.

DESVARIEUX: Okay. there are some folks that are saying that this isn’t as big of a game changer as people are making it out to be, because essentially you’re getting power to charge your electric vehicle from fossil fuel sources like coal. Do you agree with that?

HEINBERG: Not entirely. First of all, the energy mix is different in different parts of the country. Some parts of the country, electricity is mostly coming from coal. In other parts of the country the mix is more oriented toward natural gas, hydro and renewables. So, first of all, it depends on where you’re getting your electricity from.

And second, you know, if you look out at the energy transition that we’re just beginning right now, away from fossil fuels toward renewables, it’s clear that one of the main strategies that we’ll have to pursue during this energy transition is electrification. Right now only about 20 percent of the final energy that we use in the United States is in the form of electricity. The rest is in the form of liquid fuels for transportation, energy for high heat industrial processes and so on.

We have to electrify as much of that energy usage as we can, because most of our renewable sources of energy produce electricity. That’s true of solar and wind, geothermal and hydro power. So we need to electrify as much transportation as we can.

DESVARIEUX: Okay. You have some automakers, you know, really touting this as a bright future, that we’re going to see more and more electric cars hit the market. I want to ask you about the role of cheap oil. Do you think that threatens he growth of the electric car industry?

HEINBERG: Well, probably not over the long run. We’re headed toward electric cars one way or the other, I think. However, over the short run it definitely takes some wind out of the sails, because from the consumer’s standpoint the biggest draw for an electric car is that over the lifetime of ownership the operating costs are much lower, so if you have cheap gas that changes that differential a bit, so that there’s not as much of an advantage.

DESVARIEUX: Okay, let’s talk about the future. What would a truly green transportation system look like, and are there some states or countries that are really laying out a road map to get us there?

HEINBERG: Well, a truly green transportation system probably wouldn’t rely on electric cars that much because it wouldn’t be relying on cars that much. Cars are an inherently inefficient mode of transportation. I mean, think about it. Most cars just have a driver and maybe one passenger, and meanwhile you’re dragging around two tons of metal, glass and plastic in order to get those one or two people where they want to go.

Much more efficient modes of transportation are light rail, any kind of public transportation, actually. So what we really need is to build up more rail transport and get people walking and bicycling as much as possible.

DESVARIEUX: Okay. Richard Heinberg, thank you so much for joining us.

HEINBERG: It’s been a pleasure. Thanks, Jessica.

DESVARIEUX: And thank you for joining us on the Real News Network.

DISCLAIMER: Please note that transcripts for The Real News Network are typed from a recording of the program. TRNN cannot guarantee their complete accuracy.

Electric car teaser image via shutterstock. Reproduced at Resilience.org with permission.


Content on this site is subject to our fair use notice.

Resilience is a program of Post Carbon Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping the world transition away from fossil fuels and build sustainable, resilient communities.


Source URL: http://www.resilience.org/stories/2016-04-04/we-need-to-electrify-as-much-transportation-as-we-can

ST April General Mtg – Tucson’s Energy-Economy-Climate Revolution

Sustainable Tucson’s April General Meeting will provide an up-to-the-minute update on efforts to pave the way for creating a positive energy-economy-climate future for our region.

Tucson-based international economist Skip Laitner will report for the RENEW team on this important three-part community initiative. These include 1) intervening in the Arizona Corporation Commission’s current energy rate cases for southern Arizona; 2) high-level discussions with senior Tucson Electric Power staff; and 3) building community support for a sane and prosperous energy future.

RENEW (Ratepayers Expect New Economic Wisdom) is a collaboration of Tucson-based individuals, groups, and businesses who have begun the hard discussion of positive strategies that might strengthen the region’s economy at the same time we transition to clean, renewable energy sources.

Monday, April 11, 2016
Downtown Library, 101 N Stone
Lower level Conference room.
Program begins at 6:00pm. Doors open at 5:30