Tucson Talks Transit – with Jarrett Walker – July 11

at Tucson Electric Power Company, 88 East Broadway, Downtown Tucson AZ (two blocks south of Ronstadt Transit Center)

Tucson Talks Transit – with Jarrett Walker

Friday, July 11, 2014
5:00 p.m. Sign-in and Reception
6:00 p.m. FREE Public Presentation

Jarrett Walker, the preeminent transit planner and transit thinker, will visit Tucson for a town hall the evening of Friday, July 11.

Jarrett Walker is renowned as a public transportation planner and consultant, leader of major transit planning projects around the world, and facilitator of community dialogue. He is author of the book Human Transit: How clearer thinking about public transit can enrich our communities and our lives and the blog HumanTransit.org

For more info contact Suzanne, 520-289-4088, chelcdavid(at)gmail.com

also download the print flyer – Jarrett Walker 2014-07-11 Tucson Flyer (english & espanol)

 


 

Tucson Habla Sobre El Transporte – con Jarrett Walker

Viernes 11 de Julio del 2014
5:00 p.m. Registración y Recepción
6:00 p.m. Presentación Pública GRATUITA

Está invitado al diálogo con Jarrett Walker, planeador, pensador y escritor del tránsito, el viernes 11 de Julio.

Jarrett Walker se reconoce mundialmente como consultante y diseñador de transporte público, líder de grandes proyectos de planeación, y facilitador de diálogo comunitario. Es autor del libro Human Transit: How clearer thinking about public transit can enrich our communities and our lives y el blog HumanTransit.org

Tucson Electric Power Company
88 East Broadway en el Centro de la ciudad de Tucson
(a dos cuadras al sur del Centro de Tránsito Ronstadt)

Si tiene preguntas contacte a Suzanne, 520-289-4088, chelcdavid(at)gmail.com

also download the print flyer – Jarrett Walker 2014-07-11 Tucson Flyer (english & espanol)

ST September Mtg: Working Together Toward a Sustainable Community Part IV – Sept 9th

Monday, September 9, 2013

5:30 pm to 8:00 pm

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, Lower Level Meeting Room, 101 N. Stone, Downtown (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

ST September Meeting
Working Together Toward a Sustainable Community
Part IV

Sustainable Tucson’s “Conversations with our Public Officials” series provides Tucson community members the opportunity to meet with local public officials to discuss a wide range of sustainability issues. The venue offers a unique opportunity to converse with our public officials in a supportive atmosphere designed to build understanding and establish relationships.

Join Sustainable Tucson for our fourth Conversation with our Public Officials.

Jessie Baxter, Outreach Coordinator for Congressman Raul Grijalva, Ray Carroll, Pima County District 4 Supervisor, and Claire Zucker, Director, Sustainable Environment Program, Pima Association of Governments, will share their vision of a more sustainable Tucson. A networking session will precede the meeting from 5:30 to 6:00.

We believe that building a sustainable future will take the cooperation and partnering of residents, government, institutions and organizations. It is in this spirit that we are reaching out to our public officials by bringing them together with Sustainable Tucson and the wider public in this discussion process. Our ultimate intent for these popular “fishbowl discussions” is to build partnerships and work together toward our common goals.

We invite you to join us on September 9 for this exciting conversation with our local public officials.

Doors open at 5:30 pm. The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

 

Climate Smart Southwest: Ready or Hot? – National climate change conference in Tucson – Sep 20-21

Free lecture Friday evening at the TEP Unisource Building, 88 East Broadway, Tucson AZ

Saturday conference at the Tucson Convention Center (details below)

Tucson will be hosting a climate change conference focused on public health and climate adaptation in September, sponsored by Physicians for Social Responsibility and 35 other local and national organizations. The following guest article by Susan Waites has more details.

Climate Smart Southwest: Ready or Hot?

article by Susan Waites

We have all been hearing lots about climate change. Have you ever wondered if climate change will affect us here in the Southwest? Have you ever wondered if climate change will affect you and members of your family personally? Here’s an opportunity to find out. You can attend this conference focused on public health and climate adaptation coming up Friday and Saturday September 20th and 21st. The conference is being sponsored by the Physicians for Social Responsibility and 35 other local and national organizations.

To kick off this community event there will be a free talk by Eric Klinenberg, Professor of Sociology at New York University and the author of the bestselling book Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago, about the July 1995 week-long triple-digit heat wave that took over 700 lives. Dr. Klinenberg will give his talk Friday September 20 from 7 to 8pm at the TEP Unisource Building Conference Room, 88 E. Broadway in Tucson. While this event is free and open to the public, you are asked to RSVP as space is limited. You can do so by going to the conference website www.psr.org/azclimate

On Saturday September 21 the conference itself will take place from 7:30am to 5:30pm at the Tucson Convention Center. The cost is just $35 ($15 for current students) which includes a free buffet lunch and free on-site parking at the TCC. The morning of the conference will be dedicated to hearing nationally and internationally known speakers present information about climate change and emerging health problems, food security, mental health, and about how we can educate our children, build neighborhood resilience, and address cross cultural issues as we adapt to climate change. In the afternoon conference attendees will have the opportunity to participate in workshops to prepare and respond to the challenges posed by climate change. To register for Saturday’s events go to www.psr.org/azclimate

The Climate Smart Southwest Conference will be a unique opportunity to learn how climate change will affect you and your family. Best of all, you’ll learn what you can do be prepared and help yourself and your loved ones meet the challenges we will face with a changing climate. For more information, go to www.psr.org/azclimate. If you need more information, please contact Dr. Barbara Warren at bwarre01(at)gmail.com

Sustainable Tucson July Film Night!

Monday, July 8th, 5:30 – 8:00, Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Downtown (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

Sustainable Tucson will show a variety of films at our July general meeting. Included among the short and medium length topics are greening the desert, climate change in the arctic, how the people of Cuba adapted to the loss of oil and fertilizer after the Soviet Union collapsed, a Tucson documentary of a community strawbale homebuilding project, and the multifold challenges of sustainability.

Doors will open at 5:30 and films will start showing immediately. Regular monthly announcements will take place at 6:00 during a brief intermission.

Come enjoy film viewing with us at the cool Downtown Main Library lower meeting room

ST June Meeting – Working Together Toward a Sustainable Community – Part III – June 10

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Downtown (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

Working Together Toward a Sustainable Community
Part III

Last spring Sustainable Tucson hosted two “Conversations with our Public Officials.” Tucson community members had the opportunity to meet with City public officials to discuss a wide range of sustainability issues. The venue offered a unique opportunity to converse with our public officials in a supportive atmosphere designed to build understanding and establish relationships.

On June 10, from 6 – 8pm, community members will once again have the opportunity to converse with our public officials. This year we are inviting County and City officials to sit together to share their vision of a more sustainable Tucson. City of Tucson Ward 2 Council Member Paul Cunningham, Pima County District 5 Supervisor Richard Elias and Pima County Sustainability Coordinator Alex Odin will join us for our third “Conversations with our Public Officials.” A networking session will precede the meeting from 5:30 to 6:00.

We believe that building a sustainable future will take the cooperation and partnering of residents, government, institutions and organizations. It is in this spirit that we are reaching out to our public officials by bringing them together with Sustainable Tucson and the wider public in this discussion process. This is the third of our popular “fishbowl discussions.” Our ultimate intent is to build partnerships and work together toward our common goals.

We invite you to join us June 10 in this exciting conversation with our local public officials.

Doors open at 5:30 pm.
The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm.

Also see last year’s Sustainable Tucson meetings – 2012 March Conversation with our Elected Officials – 2012 June Working Together Toward a Sustainable Community Part II

March Against Monsanto worldwide – and in Tucson at Reid Park – May 25

Free movie at Murphy-Wilmot Public Library, 530 N Wilmot Road Tucson, AZ

March begins May 25 at 12 noon at Reid Park, 900 Randolph Way, Tucson AZ

 
May 19 Sunday 1:30 pm – free documentary movie showing and discussion of “The World According to Monsanto” at the Murphy-Wilmot Public Library, 530 N Wilmot Road Tucson, AZ. Also see the complete movie free online at www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VEZYQF9WlE

May 25 Saturday 12 noonMarch Against Monsanto – meet 11:30 am at the Reid Park Festival Area. March followed by speakers, entertainment, and refreshments. More info at the GMO-Free Tucson website www.gmofreetucson.org

 

March Against Monsanto

To the Sustainable Tucson Community, Farmers, Ranchers, & Community Organizations:

Please support and participate in an unprecedented worldwide March Against Monsanto and Family Friendly GMO Awareness Festival & Rally that’s taking place on Saturday, May 25th. Hundreds of Tucsonans will be marching in Reid Park at 12 Noon to raise awareness and consciousness for taking back our food supply and be part of this turning point and historic global event.

Join the grass roots community in helping to create our own safe, nutritious, sustainable Non-GMO food system free of dangerous pesticides, chemicals, GMOs and other toxins. GMOs are NOT sustainable!

As an educational event before the march, there will be a Free documentary movie showing and discussion of “The World According to Monsanto” at the Murphy-Wilmot Public Library 530 N. Wilmot Road Tucson, AZ 85711 on Sunday, May 19th at 1:30 pm.

Tucson March Against Monsanto organizers will be at the Sustainable Tucson general meeting on Monday the 13th to answer any questions about the GMO Awareness Festival and Rally and how any individuals or organizations can get involved and participate in this fabulous opportunity and historical community event.

Please support this unprecedented worldwide May 25th event by posting it on your websites, newsletters, blogs, FB pages, and inviting friends and family. Also, we welcome any other support or services you feel may help with this community-wide awareness opportunity.

www.march-against-monsanto.com

www.facebook.com/MarchAgainstMonstanto/events (sic)

www.gmofreetucson.org

Bisbee Solar Cook-Off and Festival – June 1

Free, at the Bisbee Farmers Market in Vista Park, Warren District, Bisbee Arizona

 

Bisbee Solar Cook-Off and Festival

Join Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture and the Bisbee Farmers Market for the 11th Annual Solar Cook-Off & Festival on Saturday, June 1 from 9am to 1pm.

Activities will include solar cooking demonstrations as well as solar ovens and accessories for sale.  At 10:30am, join local experts for a Solar Cooking Basics class.  At 11:30, learn how to build your own solar oven with a cardboard box and aluminum foil.  Feel free to bring a solar oven and join in the fun (a potluck will follow the event for those who prepare solar food).

Location: Bisbee Farmers Market (in Vista Park, Warren District).
For more info, visit www.bajaaz.org/calendar.  Free.

Questions?  Contact Meghan at meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org or 520-331-9821.

Bisbee Organic Garden Tour – May 26

Free, starting at Ecoasis, 54 Brewery Avenue, Bisbee Arizona

 
Join Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture (BASA) and Ecoasis on the first annual Bisbee Organic Garden Tour on Sunday, May 26 from 10am to 2pm.

This year’s tour will showcase four successful vegetable gardens along Brewery Gulch in the heart of Old Bisbee.  Come out to view artistic, inventive ways to grow produce in unconventional spaces.  Also learn how to start (or improve) your own garden, get growing tips, observe spring crops, and learn about mulching, composting, and watering systems.  Or just meet some fellow gardeners.

The tour is self-guided; stop by Ecoasis (54 Brewery Avenue) before you begin to pick up a tour map and get information on backyard growing, sustainable agriculture, and gardening for market.

This is a free event.  Contact BASA for details at www.bajaaz.org, 520-331-9821 or meghan.mix(at)bajaaz.org

Building Sustainable Cities – New York Times Conference April 25

See the online video archive of the entire conference at nytenergyfortomorrow.com

ENERGY FOR TOMORROW – BUILDING SUSTAINABLE CITIES

A NEW YORK TIMES CONFERENCE
IN COLLABORATION WITH RICHARD ATTIAS AND ASSOCIATES

APRIL 25, 2013
THE TIMESCENTER, NEW YORK CITY

 
THE CONCEPT

According to U.N. data, the worldwide urban population over the next 40 years will increase by 3.1 billion people. Where will the water come from for these people to drink and use? The fuel to heat and cool their homes? The fresh fruit and vegetables for them to eat? The modes of transportation to move them from home to workplace and back? And how can we build buildings, develop infrastructure and diversify transport in ways that limit the waste and pollutants that could make these urban areas unpleasant and unhealthy places to live? These are the issues The New York Times will tackle in its second annual Energy for Tomorrow Conference: Building Sustainable Cities.

In America and in other countries around the world, there is an enormous amount of innovation going on to make our cities more eco-friendly and sustainable. There are fleets of natural gas-fueled trucks and hybrid taxis. LEED-certified buildings are being constructed. Cutting-edge technology is helping cities cut down on energy and resource use. Summers bring urban and rooftop farming. And this innovation is occurring at both a micro and macro level.

THE FORMAT AND AUDIENCE

The New York Times will bring together some 400 thought leaders, public policy makers, government urbanists and C-suite level executives from energy, technology, automotive and construction industries among others, to debate and discuss the wide range of issues that must be addressed if we can create an urban environment that can meet the needs of its citizens and, thanks to innovation, run cleanly and efficiently. The conference will be invitation-only.

There will be a fee of $795 to attend the one-day conference, but The Times will make some grants available for N.G.O.s, entrepreneurs and start-ups to attend at a discount. The format will mix head-to-head debates, panel discussions, keynote addresses, case studies and audience brainstorming sessions.

 
APRIL 24 EVENING
(THE EVE OF THE CONFERENCE)

7 – 9p.m.
SCREENING OF THE DOCUMENTARY “TRASHED”

The documentary feature film “Trashed” highlights solutions to the pressing environmental problems facing us all. Academy Award-winning actor Jeremy Irons has teamed up with British filmmaker Candida Brady to record the devastating effect that pollution has had on some of the world’s most beautiful destinations. The screening will be followed by a conversation with Irons.

Confirmed speakers:
Jeremy Irons, actor and executive producer, “Trashed”
in conversation with David Carr, media and culture columnist, The New York Times

 
APRIL 25 AGENDA

Throughout the day, we will be conducting networking and discussion sessions (via smartphones and BlackBerries) to gather, as well as to submit questions to the panel

7 a.m.
REGISTRATION AND BREAKFAST

7:45 – 8:45 a.m.
BREAKFAST DISCUSSION
SMART VEHICLES ARE HERE: CAN GOVERNMENT KEEP PACE?

The pressures are building for safer and smarter vehicles on our roads, raising questions about the national, state and local policies that will emerge. Several states are already early adopters of legislation to enable the use of autonomous vehicles. But every law is different, no national policies exist and innovations are unfolding rapidly. With the evolution of connected vehicles, intelligent roadways, and cloud-based technologies (first maps, soon much more), there will be a host of choices for consumers and governments.

Moderated by Gordon Feller, director of urban innovations, Cisco Systems; founder, Meeting of the Minds

Confirmed Panelists:
Anthony Levandowski, manager, Google autonomous vehicle project
Alex Padilla, state senator, California
Jim Pisz, corporate manager, North American business strategy, Toyota Motor Sales Inc.
Dan Smith, senior associate administrator for vehicle safety, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
Bryant Walker Smith, fellow, Center for Automotive Research, Stanford University

9 – 9:30 a.m.
OPENING ADDRESS

Michael Bloomberg, mayor of the City of New York and chair of the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group

Introduced by Arthur Sulzberger Jr., publisher, The New York Times

9:30 – 10:15 a.m.
THE MAYORS’ PANEL
HOW DO WE REINVENT OUR CITIES FOR THE THIRD INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION?

The city of 2025 could be crisis-ridden if the world doesn’t create more sustainable models of urban development. Research says that our cities will continue to expand and increase in population, while their populations will bring rising consumption and emissions. Alongside these huge challenges, there are also opportunities for businesses: electric vehicles, new low-carbon means of cooling, and energy efficient buildings. We ask a group of mayors to outline an urban planning strategy for 2025.

Moderated by Bill Keller, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
Jaime Lerner, former mayor of Curitiba, Brazil
Stephanie Miner, mayor of Syracuse
Enrique Peñalosa, former mayor of Bogotá, Colombia
Greg Stanton, mayor of Phoenix

10:15 – 10:40 a.m.
COFFEE BREAK

10:40 – 11 a.m.
COLUMNIST CONVERSATION

Jeremy Irons, actor and executive producer, “Trashed”
in conversation with Andrew Revkin, Op-Ed columnist and author, Dot Earth blog, The New York Times

*Please note, there is a screening of “Trashed” on the eve of the conference. Seats are limited and the
screening will be open to the public. Confirmed conference participants will get priority.

11 – 11:30 a.m.
PLENARY: THINK NATIONAL, BUT POWER LOCAL

A sustainable city will use a high proportion of renewable energy, but there is a catch-22: sites that generate renewable electricity – wind farms, solar farms and tidal generators – tend to be far away from urban centers. How can we create grids that get renewable energy from the places it is made to the hundreds of millions who will use it? Meanwhile, how can we increase and incentivize localized power generation and supply? Options include district heating and cooling, and buildings producing their own power through solar powered roofs or single wind turbines, and then sharing that power through a smart grid.

Moderated by Thomas L. Friedman, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
Sabine Froning, C.E.O., Euroheat and Power
Patricia Hoffman, assistant secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S.
Kevin Burke, chairman, president and C.E.O., Consolidated Edison Inc.

11:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
COLUMNIST CONVERSATION

Shaun Donovan, United States secretary of housing and urban development
in conversation with Thomas L. Friedman, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

12 – 12:40 p.m.
GAMECHANGERS: THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION

Cutting-edge technology is helping cities cut down on energy and resource use and this innovation is occurring at both a micro and macro level. Can we innovate quickly enough?

Moderated by Joe Nocera, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
Stephen Kennedy Smith, president, Em-Link LLC
Judi Greenwald, vice president for technology and innovation, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions
Adam Grosser, group head and partner, Silver Lake Kraftwerk
Neil Suslak, founder and managing partner, Braemar Energy
Steven E. Koonin, director of the Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP)

12:40 – 2:05 p.m.
LUNCH AND BRAINSTORMING, URBAN FOOD SUPPLY

Lunch will take place in the Hall downstairs; during lunch we will host a brainstorming discussion featuring expert panelists on the Urban Food Supply.

Moderated by Mark Bittman, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

Discussion leaders:
Will Allen, founder and C.E.O., Growing Power
Dave Wann, president, Sustainable Futures Society
Dan Barber, chef and co-owner, Blue Hill at Stone Barns and director of program, President’s Council on
Fitness, Sports and Nutrition

2:05 – 2:40 p.m.
DISCUSSION: GREEN BUILDINGS AND URBAN DESIGN

Sustainable cities need energy-efficient buildings and the current symbol of urban architecture – the glass and metal skyscraper – scores badly in this regard. What kinds of building should be the centerpieces of new sustainable cities? Are current green building codes leading us in the right direction? Nearly half of the world’s new megacities will be in China and India: how can their leaders ensure that the millions of new structures in these cities use energy sparingly and follow sustainable urban planning?

Moderated by Michael Kimmelman, architecture critic, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
David Fisk, co-director of the BP Urban Energy Systems Project and Laing O’Rourke Professor in Systems Engineering and Innovation, Imperial College London
Hal Harvey, C.E.O., Energy Innovation: Policy and Technology LLC
Katrin Klingenberg, Passivehouse Institute, USA
Jonathan Rose, founder and president, Jonathan Rose Companies
Martha Schwartz, professor in practice of landscape architecture, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, and co-founder, Working Group for Sustainable Cities, Harvard University

2:40 – 3:15 p.m.
DISCUSSION: TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC

An effective and energy-efficient transport network is the skeleton of a sustainable city, allowing residents to move from home to work with a minimum of congestion, pollution or emissions. The solutions are different for old cities and new cities, and for rich cities and poor cities. But the traditional model of urban expansion followed by new roads has created a vicious spiral where new roads beget more cars, which beget the need for more roads. New, more sustainable ideas for city transportation not only reduce emissions, but also improve quality of life.

Moderated by Joe Nocera, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
Walter Hook, C.E.O., Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
Peder Jensen, head of programme, governance and networks, European Environment Agency
Anna Nagurney, director, Virtual Center for Supernetworks, Isenberg School of Management, University of Massachusetts
Naveen Lamba, intelligent transportation lead, IBM
Janette Sadik-Khan, NYC transportation commissioner

3:15 – 3:30 p.m.
COLUMNIST CONVERSATION
PLANET-WARMING EMISSIONS: IS DISASTER INEVITABLE?

Klaus Jacob, adjunct professor, School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University
in conversation with Joe Nocera, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

3:30 – 4:15 p.m.
NETWORKING DISCUSSION:
Participants will be split into two concurrent sessions to brainstorm two issues on the sustainable agenda. Led by a member of The Times team, and with an expert panel to comment and shape the discussions, participants will brainstorm ideas together. The results of the brainstorming – including suggested actions – will be released after the event.

DISCUSSION 1: TRANSPORT

Ingvar Sejr Hansen, head of city planning, City of Copenhagen
Ari Kahn, policy adviser for electric vehicles, New York City Mayor’s Office of Long-term Planning and Sustainability
Bruce Schaller, deputy commissioner for traffic and planning, New York City Department of Transportation
Greg Stanton, mayor of Phoenix

DISCUSSION 2: GREEN SPACES

Kai-Uwe Bergmann, partner, Bjarke Ingels Group
Steven Caputo Jr., deputy director, New York City Mayor’s Office of Long-term Planning and Sustainability
Susan Donoghue, senior adviser and assistant commissioner for strategic initiatives, New York City Parks
Deborah Marton, senior vice president of programs, New York Restoration Project

4:15 – 4:35 p.m.
COFFEE BREAK

4:35 – 4:55 p.m.
COLUMNIST CONVERSATION

Carol Browner, senior counselor, Albright Stonebridge Group, and former energy czar
in conversation with Bill Keller, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

4:55 – 5:45 p.m.
CLOSING PLENARY
DEALBOOK: INVESTING IN THE CITY OF TOMORROW

The challenge is to reinvent and retool the cities and urban life in a guise that is more sustainable – and to do it fast. Some of the best minds in the developed and developing worlds are trying to address this global issue. Architects, urban planners and engineers are drawing up plans. Business consultants are looking for new business opportunities as these sustainable cities evolve. The World Bank is trying to figure out how to finance their growth. How can we finance the creation of the city of tomorrow?

Moderated by Andrew Ross Sorkin, columnist/editor, DealBook, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
Alicia Glen, managing director, Urban Investment Group, Goldman Sachs
Richard Kauffman, chairman of energy and finance, Office of the Governor, State of New York
William McDonough, chairman, McDonough Advisors

5:45 p.m. CLOSING AND RECEPTION

 
See the online video archive of the entire conference at nytenergyfortomorrow.com

Awakening the Dreamer workshops – Circle Tree Ranch – June 10, Sep 9, Dec 9

 
Free (RSVP) at Circle Tree Ranch, 10500 E Tanque Verde Road, Tucson AZ 85749

 

 

Awakening the Dreamer – Changing the Dream

“Cultural Wisdom: The Indigenous Worldview as a Model for Social and Environmental Justice”

The Awakening the Dreamer – Changing the Dream Symposium is a profound inquiry into a bold vision: to bring forth an environmentally sustainable spiritually fulfilling and socially just human presence on Earth.

The symposium involves dynamic group interactions, cutting-edge information, and inspiring multimedia. Participants of this half-day event are inspired to reconnect with their deep concern for our world, and to recognize our responsibilities to each other, future generations, our fellow creatures, and the planet we jointly inhabit.

Designed with the collaboration of some of the finest scientific, indigenous and socially conscious minds in the world, the symposium explores the current state of our planet and connects participants to a powerful global movement to reclaim our future.

This dynamic and innovative presentation will explore the ancient wisdom of cultures around the globe and their spiritual, social, and environmental worldview. Recognizing the critical role of community, participants engage with one another in analyzing methods that create earth-honoring systems and ways of being. Experiencing the world as profoundly interconnected, participants will understand how in their living practices they can bring forth an environmentally sustainable, socially just, and spiritual fulfilling human presence on our planet. The goal of the presentation is to provide an experience that inspires each person to stand for an entirely new possibility for our future by embracing the indigenous worldview as a model for social and environmental justice.

Amity Foundation – Circle Tree Ranch
Bear Hall
10500 E Tanque Verde Road
Tucson, AZ 85749

RSVP to Pamela Jay at 520-749-5980 ext.252 or email pjay(at)amityfdn.org

3 Continuing Education Hours, NAADAC Provider #538

Donations welcomed for Dragonfly Village – dedicated to the inclusion and habilitation of children and families marginalized by homelessness, poverty, addiction, crime, racism, sexism, trauma, and violence.

www.circletreeranch.org

Move to Amend – Corporations Are Not People – May 10

May 2 planning meeting at Unitarian Church, 22nd between Swan and Craycroft

May 10 demonstration at Miracle Mile freeway entrance

 

Move to Amend – Corporations Are Not People

JOIN US IN A NATIONWIDE ACTION ON MAY 10TH (details below) urging Americans to take the next step in passing a CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT which declares that corporations are not persons, and money is not speech.

The disastrous “Citizens United” ruling was just the death knell in the 127-year-long corporate takeover of our government, and must be overturned, to return control of our government to the people.

Until we do that, we will not be able to achieve any of the changes necessary for stopping the slide of the middle class into poverty, creating jobs instead of soaring unemployment, holding Wall Street, Big Banks, and other financial entities accountable for their crimes against Americans, social justice, freedom from war waged for corporate profit, preventing reckless plundering and poisoning of natural resources, and saving our environment. Currently, we can’t even pass legislation for background checks on gun purchases.

Twelve states have already formally requested a Constitutional Amendment to overturn “Citizens United”

We need 22 more to make it happen.

May 10th is the date of the action, and we need volunteers now to help in planning and preparation, and to help in executing it on the 10th IN LARGE ENOUGH NUMBERS THAT THE MEDIA CANNOT IGNORE IT.

COME TO OUR MEETING at 7:00 PM WED MAY 2ND AT THE UNITARIAN CHURCH ON 22ND BETWEEN SWAN AND CRAYCROFT, TO HELP US IN OUR PLAN TO GET THE WORD OUT TO ALL AMERICANS ON MAY 10TH !

The plan is to have a very large group of real “persons” holding a 45-foot long banner on the walkway over the freeway at the Miracle Mile freeway entrance from 7:00 AM until 9:00 AM facing incoming rush hour traffic, and from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM facing outgoing rush hour traffic on Fri. May 10th.

www.MoveToAmend.org

Local Food Summit at U of A – Gary Nabhan & Jeff Silvertooth – May 14

at Student Union Memorial Center, South Ballroom, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ

 

Local Food Summit

with Gary Nabhan and Jeff Silvertooth

At this working summit, participants will develop action plans for how University of Arizona entities and partners can support socially equitable, economically viable, and environmentally sound local food systems. To break out of our disciplinary silos, this summit will foster collaboration within the university for those working on issues related to local food systems. The summit is free but limited to 100 participants, so application is required with this form.

http://www.portal.environment.arizona.edu/events/local-food-summit

Pima County Food Alliance – April Meeting – April 29

at the Sam Lena Library, 1607 S 6th Ave, Tucson AZ

 
Join the Pima County Food Alliance for our monthly meeting on Monday, April 29 from 6:00 to 8:00pm at the Sam Lena Library (1607 S 6th Ave, Tucson).

April is Native Foods Month at the Pima County Food Alliance!

This month we’ll be hearing from two experts on native foods. The first is Chef Barry Infuso, who works with Pima Community College and is known for his work with the Pascua Yaqui Tribe. In particular, Infuso’s work has explored the use of native, culturally appropriate foods as an avenue to (re-)establishing health with a population that has suffered tremendously from the pervasiveness of the Western diet.

Amy Schwemm, known around town for her delicious mesquite cookies and prickly pear lemonade, comes to us from a local organization called Desert Harvesters. If you’re not familiar with the organization, well…you should be. Come learn about all the great native food- and plant-related work they’re doing, and find ways to plug in.

The Pima County Food Alliance works to engage community partners to understand and develop our food system through the following strategies:

Education: Creating opportunities for coalition members, their families, friends, neighbors, schools, and elected officials to learn about the importance of sustainably growing and eating healthful food as well as relevant food policy issues.

Networking: Having a space to meet and learn from other food councils and individuals in the community who are involved in community-based food projects and programs.

Outreach: Meeting with and inviting other individuals, organizations, agencies and policy makers to collaborate around the goals of the group.

Policy change: Determining what governmental, institutional, and corporate policies are barriers to or opportunities to improve the conditions involved in growing and eating sustainable, local, and healthful food. Work to promote healthy and sustainable policies based on community-wide collaboration.

Contact Meghan at 520-331-9821 with any questions!

Cooking the Books: The True Climate Impact of Keystone XL


Click to view/download a pdf of the full report

Cooking the Books: The True Climate Impact of Keystone XL

April 16, 2013

A new report out today from environmental groups shows that the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline would, if approved, be responsible for at least 181 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) each year, comparable to the tailpipe emissions from more than 37.7 million cars or 51 coal-fired power plants.

In documenting the emissions associated with the controversial pipeline project, the report makes real the scale of climate impact and the further hurdles the project would create for the battle against climate change, putting the State Department’s “business as usual” scenarios into doubt.

The major findings of “Cooking the Books: How The State Department Analysis Ignores the True Climate Impact of the Keystone XL Pipeline” are:

– The 181 million metric tons of (CO2e) from Keystone XL is equivalent to the tailpipe emissions from more than 37.7 million cars. This is more cars than are currently registered on the entire West Coast (California, Washington, and Oregon), plus Florida, Michigan, and New York – combined.

– Between 2015 and 2050, the pipeline alone would result in emissions of 6.34 billion metric tons of CO2e. This amount is greater than the 2011 total annual carbon dioxide emissions of the United States.

– The International Energy Agency has said that two-thirds of known fossil fuel reserves must remain undeveloped if we are to avoid a 2 degree C temperature rise. Constructing the Keystone XL pipeline and developing the tar sands make that goal far more difficult, if not impossible, to reach.

“When evaluating this project, the State Department should apply a simple test: Does its completion bring the U.S. closer to meeting its climate goals? The answer is clearly no, and therefore the project must be denied,” said Steve Kretzmann, Executive Director of Oil Change International.

In its 2012 World Energy Outlook, the IEA is very clear about the impact of climate policy on U.S. oil demand. If meaningful climate policy is pursued, U.S. oil demand would necessarily be cut 50 percent by 2035 and 70 percent by 2050 based on a 2012 baseline.

“Alberta’s premier was just in Washington, DC noting how essential the pipeline is to meeting increased production of the dirtiest oil on the planet. The numbers in this report make it clear that we can’t afford to help Big Oil meet that goal,” said Elizabeth Shope of the Natural Resources Defense Council.

U.S. demand for oil has declined since 2005 by 2.25 million barrels per day – or the equivalent of almost three Keystone XL pipelines.

“Any objective analysis of the impact of building Keystone shows that it would be a climate catastrophe,” said Ross Hammond, senior campaigner for Friends of the Earth. “Instead, the State Department seems ready to buy into the pipeline propaganda of an army of lobbyists who are trading on their ties to Secretary Kerry and President Obama to taint the decision. The president must act in the national interest, not the interests of Big Oil, and reject the Keystone XL pipeline.”

“Today’s report clearly demonstrates that we can’t protect future generations from the worst impacts of global warming while allowing ourselves to become hooked on even dirtier sources of fuel,” said Daniel Gatti, Get Off Oil Program Director for Environment America. “We need President Obama and Secretary Kerry to say no to tar sands, and no to the Keystone XL pipeline.”

“If he’s to keep his promise to confront climate change to protect America’s wildlife and communities, President Obama should say no to the proposed Keystone XL tar sands pipeline,” said Jim Murphy, senior counsel at the National Wildlife Federation. “Our leaders can’t have it both ways – if they’re truly committed to protecting America’s wildlife and communities from climate change, they need to say no to Keystone XL and massive amounts of climate-disrupting carbon pollution it would deliver.”

The report was researched and written by Oil Change International with input and review by the Natural Resources Defense Council, 350.org, Environment America, National Wildlife Federation, Friends of the Earth, the Sierra Club and Greenpeace.

Original article by David Turnbull – http://priceofoil.org/2013/04/16/cooking-the-books-the-true-climate-impact-of-keystone-xl/

Submit a comment to the State Department regarding the Keystone XL pipeline here.

100% Renewable Energy – Earth Day Weekend Rally – April 20

at Tucson Electric Power Headquarters, 88 E Broadway Blvd, Tucson AZ (corner of Broadway and Scott, just west of 6th Ave)

100% Renewable Energy: Earth Day Weekend Rally

This Saturday April 20 at 10:00 am, the Tucson Climate Action Network continues its campaign to stop TEP’s stockpiling and burning of coal and push ahead with a full transition to renewable energy for southern Arizona.

Bring your brightest yellow shirt or top (to symbolize solar energy) AND a black shirt or top (to symbolize fossil fuels). We will do two group photos to demonstrate our preference for renewable energy. Bring signs if you can. We will supply some signs and other props. This demonstration will only be one hour long. Bring your family and friends for this community event.

When: Saturday, April 20, 2013, 10 to 11 am (group photo at 10:45 am)

Where: Tucson Electric Power Headquarters, 88 E. Broadway Blvd., Tucson (this is the corner of Broadway and Scott, just west of 6th Ave.)

To share the event via Facebook, sign up here www.facebook.com/events/449689741774850/

Fore more info, contact rongoproctor(at)hotmail.com, 520-629-9788

How Can Arizona Survive the Coming Dust Bowl? – Climate presentation at Milagro – May 4

at Milagro Cohousing, 3057 N Gaia Place, Tucson, AZ
Come early for a tour of Milagro at 4 pm.

How Can Arizona Survive the Coming Dust Bowl?

Presentation by renowned climate scientist Dr. Steve Ghan, a Fellow of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Editor-in-Chief of the Atmospheres Section of the Journal of Geophysical Research.

Refreshment will be available before any dust bowl conversations! And during as well as afterwards. Come early for a tour of Milagro at 4:00PM as well.

For more info, contact EVJerry, email EVisionA2Z(at)usa.net or phone (202)486-5450

Hosted by the ECO ED Committee of Milagro Cohousing

www.milagrocohousing.org

Sustainable Tucson Community Fundraising Appeal

Sustainable Tucson needs your support to continue to present timely, interesting and informative monthly programs. With minimal financial support from the larger community we have provided continuous monthly programs for nearly seven years, drawing particularly on local talent and sustainability leaders. As we increasingly bring in cutting-edge speakers from other cities and regions, Sustainable Tucson faces greater costs and increased organizational needs.

A brief review of previous programs archived on our website shows the breadth and depth of subject matter we have produced for the emerging sustainability community free of charge. More than 2,000 people have directly benefited from our educational, networking, and advocacy opportunities. Efforts to provide media coverage of our events will reach many thousands more.

There are two ways you can help us further our mission to foster greater understanding  and collaborative activities ensuring resilience and a sustainable future.  One way is to use your credit card and go to our online donation webpage: (http://www.sustainabletucson.org/contactcontribute/donate). The other is simply to write a check to “NEST Inc — Sustainable Tucson”  and mail it to P.O. Box 41144, Tucson, AZ 85717

Thank you for your support and remember that every dollar donated to Sustainable Tucson goes a long way to help all of us find our way to more sustainable lives and a more sustainable community.

Tucson Time Traders – Tucson’s Local Timebank

Please see timetraders.metasofa.org for more information on our Timebank orientation meetings and other events.

We’re also at Sustainable Tucson Monthly Meetings to give information about timebanking and Tucson Time Traders, and help you sign up online.

 

TUCSON TIME TRADERS

Helping Build Community 1 Hour at a Time

Tucson Time Traders is our local Timebank for the Tucson region.  Check the website for our latest news and events, or open a new account, or login if you’re a member – http://timetraders.metasofa.org

 

What Is A Time Bank?

A Timebank is a group of people who trade an hour of work for an hour of work – everyone’s time is valued equally.  The hours are recorded in the timebank software so we can trade them around the timebank community.  Timebanking is a great way for people to exchange assistance and help build healthy communities.

Core Values

We are all assets – Every human being has something to contribute.

Redefining work – Some work is beyond price.  We need to value whatever it takes to raise healthy children, build strong families, revitalize neighborhoods, make democracy work, advance social justice, make the planet sustainable.

Reciprocity – Helping works better as a two-way street.  “How can I help you?” becomes “How can we help each other build the world we both will live in?”

Community – We need each other.  Networks are stronger than individuals… People helping each other reweave communities of support, strength and trust.

Respect – Every human being matters.  Respect underlies freedom of speech and freedom of religion, and supplies the heart and soul of democracy.

Intrigued?

Open a Tucson Time Traders account online, and come to an orientation meetingMembership is free and open to everyone.

For some background information, take a quick look at these excellent short videos and a sample of resources within our local timebank.

timetraders.metasofa.org

 
Also see Sustainable Tucson joins Tucson Timebank
and ST February Meeting – Tucson’s Economy

ST May Meeting – Food Resilience in the Time of Global Climate Change – May 13

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N Stone, Downtown Tucson (in the large lower-level meeting room, free lower-level parking off Alameda St)

Food Resilience in the Time of Global Climate Change

Almost all the food we eat in Tucson is not grown here. It isn’t even grown in Arizona.

Please join us for the May Sustainable Tucson meeting, and discuss with a panel of local food experts what Tucson can do to become more food resilient, and connect with local food organizations and vendors. Find out what you can do here in Tucson at the Resource and Networking session.

Nobody knows for sure how much of Tucson’s food is grown in Arizona, but the best informed guesses are that it is only a small percentage (perhaps as little as 2%-3%). The rest comes from hundreds or even thousands of miles away. Are we food secure? Can we be? Should we even try? Can we become more food resilient? Tucson can grow a lot more of our food locally than we do today, and do it sustainably and healthily. Is that important? What will it take? What are our options?

Our panel of speakers will be

Bill McDorman, Native Seeds/SEARCH
Elizabeth Mikesell, Pima County Food Alliance
Stéphane Herbert-Fort, Local Roots Aquaponics
Rafael de Grenade, Desert Oasis Initiative
Adam Valdivia, Sleeping Frog Farms
Dan Dorsey, Sonoran Permaculture Guild

And take the opportunity to meet with these organizations that are making Tucson more food resilient,

Community Gardens of Tucsonwww.communitygardensoftucson.org
Local Roots Aquaponicswww.localrootsaquaponics.com
Tucson Aquaponics Projectwww.tucsonap.org
Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculturewww.bajaza.org
Native Seeds/SEARCHwww.nativeseeds.org
Flor de Mayo Artswww.flordemayoarts.com
Iskashitaa Refugee Networkwww.iskashitaa.org
Tucson Organic Gardenerswww.tucsonorganicgardeners.org
Walking J Farmwww.walkingjfarm.com
Pima County Public Library Seed Library – www.library.pima.gov/seed-library

Explore with us what Tucson could become: 
“Resilient Tucson 2020 – Visions of a local, healthy, sustainable food supply for Tucson”. Find out what’s happening now, what’s possible, and what you can do.

We meet at the Joel Valdez downtown library, lower level meeting room (free parking under the Library, enter from Alameda Street).

Doors open at 5:30 pm
The meeting will begin at 6:00 pm
Free and open to the public

Also see Local Food Summit May 14 at U of A with Gary Nabhan & Jeff Silvertooth

Ask for Transportation Alternatives! – ADOT hearing in Tucson – Apr 12

at Pascua Yaqui Justice Center – Albert V Garcia Auditorium, 7777 S Camino Huivism, Building C, Tucson AZ

ADOT hearing in Tucson – Fri, Apr 12th, 9 AM
Ask for Transportation Alternatives!

Come to a public hearing and speak in support of transportation options.

There will be a hearing in Tucson this Friday, April 12th at 9:00 am on ADOT’s 5-year plan. We’re asking ADOT to include transit, passenger rail, biking, and pedestrian projects in their 5-year plan.

Some quick background:

Every spring, ADOT comes out with an updated 5-year construction plan and gets public comment on the plan. The 5-year plan has huge implications for our transportation system because the projects in it are the ones that get funded and built. And as usual, this year the only projects in the plan are highways and airports, which means that there won’t be any rail, transit, pedestrian, or bicycling projects that get funded and built through the 5-year plan.

This is in disconnect with the trend of Arizonans driving less, young people choosing not to drive (which was covered in a great article in the Arizona Republic last year), and as our aging population will need options other than automobiles. It doesn’t make sense to invest Arizona’s scarce transportation dollars in yesterday’s transportation system. ADOT would say that their hands are tied in a lot of ways, so they can’t fund transportation alternatives. That’s true to extent – for example, they can’t use gas tax money to fund transit like other states can – but there is more that they could be doing, such as flexing their federal Surface Transportation Program dollars to fund transit or by making sure that bike paths and sidewalks are included and funded when they build or expand a road.

We’re asking ADOT to do what they can to make sure their 5-year plan reflects that Arizonans want and need more transportation options. To do this, we’ll need to show them that there’s broad support for walking, bicycling, transit, and passenger rail.

This Friday’s hearing (Friday, April 12th; 9:00 am) will be held in the Pascua Yaqui Justice Center in the Albert V. Garcia Auditorium at 7777 S. Camino Huivism, Building C in Tucson.

If you can attend, please contact Serena Unrein of Arizona PIRG – email sunrein(at)arizonapirg.org or phone 602-252-1184 – and she can provide you with sample talking points and more information.

Community Vision for the Ronstadt Transit Center – Tucson Bus Riders Union – April 2

at the Rialto Theatre, 318 East Congress Street, Tucson AZ

 

Community Vision for the Ronstadt Transit Center

Music, food, information, and the opportunity to give YOUR input.

As downtown development proceeds, what will become of the Ronstadt Center? The City of Tucson has begun a public process aimed at “seeking a qualified development team to plan, design, construct and own/lease/manage some components of an integrated mixed use development/transit center.”

Tucson Bus Riders Union is taking the lead by hosting a community discussion about the future of Ronstadt. Help make sure the Ronstadt Center truly serves Tucson’s bus riders and that our downtown is for everyone!

Join the conversation.
Bring your ideas… Your story… Your voice

Hosted by Tucson Bus Riders Union and Primavera Foundation.
For information or to help with this event, contact Suzanne, 289-4088, chelcdavid(at)gmail.com


Ronstadt Center user survey, Wednesday, April 10

Tucson Bus Riders Union is seeking volunteers to help survey bus riders at the Ronstadt Center, in cooperation with Sun Tran and the Downtown Tucson Partnership.

If you’d like to participate for a 3-hour shift between 4:30 a.m. and 8:00 p.m., contact Suzanne, 289-4088, chelcdavid(at)gmail.com, for info about the brief training session to be held in the preceding days.

A great opportunity to learn about transit users and the current downtown scene!

Rethinking Money in Tucson – meetings with Bernard Lietaer & Jacqui Dunne – March 25 & 26

Monday – Santa Rita Room, Student Union, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ
Tuesday – City of Tucson Public Works Building, 201 N. Stone Avenue, Meeting Room C in the basement

 
Both events are Free. Monday’s will also be webcast (ask for address). Please RSVP for Tuesday.

Rethinking Money: A Wildcat Currency?

Date: Monday, March 25, 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.
Location: Santa Rita Room, Student Union, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
Contact: rshatz(at)inno-tech.org / mfoudy(at)gmail.com

“Currently, we stand at an extraordinary inflection point in human history. Several intergenerational, even millennial cycles are coming to a close including the end of the Cold War (50 years), of the Industrial Age (250 years) of Modernism (500 years), of Hyper-Rationalism (2,500 years), and of Patriarchy (5,000 years).” from Rethinking Money by Bernard Lietaer and Jacqui Dunne

Recognizing the complex duality played by the market economy and the invisible economy (unpaid ‘volunteer’ work), we see that goods and services produced for oneself and one’s circle are quite real, but they are not measured nor valued in the Gross Domestic Product. What we create in the invisible economy does more than complement the array of goods and services generated in the market economy. It engenders Community Spirit. Now 4000 Communities around the planet have started to monetize the invisible economy to improve quality of life for all.

Jacqui and Bernard will help us begin to explore ways to monetize the Wildcat Mystique into our own currency. What would it look like, how would it be earned, how would it be used, how would it be recycled, how is it managed, what are the metrics, how much money do we start with, how will it be funded, how do all of the pieces fit together? How do we brand this?

Bernard Lietaer, MIT PhD in economics, served as an official of the Central Bank of Belgium, and as President of Belgium’s Electronic Payment System. He was an architect of the European Currency Unit that transformed into the Eurocurrency System, and Business Week named him “Top World Currency Trader” in 1992. Ms. Jacqui Dunne is an award winning journalist and a leader in identifying, evaluating and promoting environmentally friendly technologies.

Rethinking Money: A Tucson Currency?

Date: Tuesday, March 26, 1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (doors open at 1 pm)
Location: City of Tucson Public Works Building, 201 N. Stone Avenue, Meeting Room C in the basement
Contact: rshatz(at)inno-tech.org / mfoudy(at)gmail.com

What is complementary currency? How can we promote economic activity especially among small businesses and build the Tucson community?

You are invited to attend a conversation with the Author of “Rethinking Money”, Bernard Lietaer. Mr Lietaer holds a PhD in economics from MIT and served at the Central Bank of Belgium, and as President of Belgium’s Electronic Payment System. He was an architect of the Euro. He will be joined by Jacqui Dunne, an award winning journalist, and Tucsonan Tom Greco, a currency expert. Learn how 4000 communities around the world have started to monetize the invisible economy for a quality of life for all.

Jacqui, Bernard and Tom will help us explore opportunities to create our own complementary currency; discussing for example: “What would it look like, how would it be earned, how would it be used, how would it be recycled, how is it managed, what are the metrics, how much money do we start with, how will it be funded, how do all of the pieces fit together? How do we brand this?”

There is no cost to attend, but RSVP is requested to mfoudy(at)gmail.com

Co-sponsored by University of Arizona, National Law Center, Sunbelt World Trade Association, Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, and SABHA.

 
Also see Money and Life – Fox Theater March 26 and Tucson Time Traders – Tucson’s Local Timebank

31st Annual Solar Potluck – Catalina State Park – April 6

at Catalina State Park near Tucson AZ

Citizens for Solar – 31st Annual Solar Potluck

Saturday, April 6 from 10 am to sunset at Catalina State Park

The Solar Potluck is free and open to the public, although the park charges a $7/carload entry fee.

Please go to Citizens for Solar website for more info – citizensforsolar.org

ST April Meeting – Power to the People: Should TEP be municipalized? – April 8

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Downtown Tucson (in the large lower-level meeting room, free lower-level parking off Alameda St)

Power to the People:
Should TEP be municipalized?

with guest speaker Leslie Glustrom, Research Director for Clean Energy Action, Boulder Colorado

also speaking – Dan Millis (Sierra Club)

The science is clear. We need to slow the rate of atmospheric carbon emissions to avoid the worst effects of run-away climate change. A “Manhattan Project”-scale effort is needed to de-carbonize our culture if present and future generations are to have a chance to adapt. There is plenty we can do as individuals to tackle the problem: modify our lifestyle; reduce our energy and material consumption, the carbon footprint of our travel, diet, and so forth. But there are aspects of our energy consumption where we seem to have little or no choice – like the carbon-intensive electricity supplied by our local utility, Tucson Electric Power (TEP).

Or is there a choice?

Initiatives have begun to spring up around the country to municipalize privately owned utilities, like TEP, that are resisting the transition to clean energy sources. In 2011, voters in Boulder, Colorado approved two ballot measures to allow the city to create a municipal utility placing it among the nations’ first communities in decades to do so.

The city’s most recent analysis found that Boulder could get 54% of its energy from renewable resources and cut greenhouse gas emissions by more than 50% at a lower cost than the current provider, Xcel Energy.

On Monday, April 8th, Sustainable Tucson is bringing Leslie Glustrom, Research Director for Clean Energy Action, to town to share the lessons learned from Boulder’s campaign to reclaim its energy future. We hope you’ll come and join the conversation about whether or not Tucson might pursue a similar path.

We meet at the Joel Valdez downtown library, lower level meeting room.

Doors open at 5:30 pm
The meeting will begin at 6:00 pm
Free and open to the public

Followup – For a download of Leslie’s informative powerpoint, an audio recording of this important presentation, and further info & notes, please see (and contribute to) the comments on this post, below…

Citizens Climate Lobby monthly conference call & planning meeting – (usually) first Saturdays

at 255 W University Blvd, Tucson AZ

Groups meet at 9:45am PT / 12:45pm ET, the international conference call starts at 10:00 am PT / 1:00 pm ET. The conference call is about an hour long, and the groups meet for another hour after that to plan actions.

 

Citizens Climate Lobby – Monthly Conference Call

www.citizensclimatelobby.org

 

Saturday, July 13th 2013, 9:45am (3rd Saturday)
Guest Speaker: Lynne Twist of the Pachamama Alliance

 

Saturday, March 2, 2013

Guest speaker: Dr. Amanda Staudt, National Wildlife Federation

Dr. Amanda Staudt is a climate scientist with the National Wildlife Federation who uses her expertise to translate complex scientific theories into terms the public can understand.  Dr. Staudt connects the dots between global warming and weather related phenomenon including wildfires, hurricanes, increased flooding and drought in certain areas of the country. On our next call, she will give an overview of the National Climate Assessment, a report that will be finalized and released later this year.

 

Actions:

1) Write letters to your two senators asking them to improve and co-sponsor the Climate Protection Act, and plan your group’s strategy for generating additional support in your state for this legislation.

2) Confirm which members of Congress your group will research and schedule meetings with during the conference in Washington this summer.

 

For more info, come to a meeting, or email Tucson Climate Action Network tucan.news(at)gmail.com or phone 400-1775

Also see: Tucson Climate Action Network monthly meetings, the March 2013 Sustainable Tucson meeting on Climate Change Activism, and the Citizens Climate Lobby website

ST March Meeting – Climate Change Activism – March 11

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Downtown Tucson (in the large lower-level meeting room, free lower-level parking off Alameda St)

Climate Change Activism – Messaging and Solutions

with guest speaker Julie Robinson, Center for Climate Change Communication, George Mason University

In our future there will be no more important issue to the health of humans and continuance of civil society than that of Climate Change and its disruptive effects.

Projections of increasing heat in our region (now 6-10 degrees F by the turn of the century), increasing severity of drought and wildfire, decreasing water supply, distant crop failures and super storms lay before us a challenge to which we either respond or succumb. Detrimental environmental, health and economic effects all stem from a historic reliance on fuels producing carbon dioxide, and exacerbated by a region planning for an ever increasing population.

The timeframe for effective action to mitigate the worst outcomes continues to shrink, and we find ourselves at our own localized ground zero. It is this paradigm that motivates a growing number of concerned citizens to put aside other life tasks to concentrate more of their time on tackling the climate change challenge.

The goal of this Sustainable Tucson meeting is to increase participation in effective climate change activism in Tucson.

Please join us this month and learn about climate change messaging from our guest speaker Julie Robinson, a recent post-doc with the Center for Climate Change Communication (George Mason University). She will present an overview of relevant work in this field including the latest research conducted by her colleagues at Mason and Yale on Global Warming’s Six Americas.

And please acquaint yourselves with the work being done locally and globally by Tucson Climate Action Network (TUCAN), the local activist community… and hopefully lend your support for TUCAN’s mission and these initiatives, presented by some of our local activists,

350.org – Patsy Stewart
Sierra Club – Dan Millis
Interfaith Power and Light – Lisa McDaniels-Hutchings
Tucson Bus Riders Union – Susan Willis
Physicians for Social Responsibility – Dr. Barbara Warren
National Institute for Peer Support – Bridget Stoll
Citizen’s Climate Lobby for national Carbon Fee and Dividend legislation – Ron Proctor

If there was ever a time to support a climate action solution, the time is now. Come find out about solutions to this most-challenging dilemma, and join a growing community of activist-friends in the process.

See you there,
Ron Proctor
Coordinator, Sustainable Tucson

Monday, March 11th, 2013 at the Joel Valdez Library
in the large lower-level meeting room.

Doors open at 5:30 pm
The meeting will begin at 6:00 pm
Free and open to the public

p.s. Here are Julie Robinson’s powerpoint slides for this presentation, other notes and audio recordings will be available here soon…

Also see: Tucson Climate Action Network meetings and monthly conference call with the Citizens Climate Lobby. View this recent interview with Anthony Leiserowitz, Yale climate change communication expert, by journalist Bill Moyers.

The 4th Annual Water Festival – Tucson Arts Brigade – Earth Day – April 21

Earth Day at Reid Park, Tucson Arts Brigade presents
 

THE WATER FESTIVAL

Synergy of Art, Science, and Community

The 4th Annual Water Festival, presented by Tucson Arts Brigade, raises awareness and promotes stewardship for water and water-related themes relating to sustainability, health, and community.

The Water Festival brings community together through creative and diverse activities for learning, networking, and family friendly fun – featuring an exhibitor fair, workshops, speakers, performances, art show, “The Vibe” Live Art Happenings, Design for Water Solutions Contest, 3-mi Walk for Water, and a mermaid in a wishing well.

This year, The Water Festival is partnering with The Earth Day Festival at Reid Park on Sunday, April 21, 2013, 9am-2pm, and expects over 5,000 people.

 
CALL FOR PARTNERS, EXHIBITORS, ARTISTS & VOLUNTEERS!

Register as a Sponsor, Exhibitor, Artist / Inventor, Activity Leader, or Volunteer.

More info / Register:
phone: 520-623-2119
email: info(at)WaterFestivalTucson.org
web: www.WaterFestivalTucson.org

c/o Tucson Arts Brigade
PO Box 545, Tucson AZ 85702
www.TucsonArtsBrigade.org

Edgar Cahn, TimeBanks USA – How President Obama Can Beat The Odds And Make Good On His Commitments

How President Obama Can Beat The Odds And Make Good On His Commitments

from Edgar S. Cahn, CEO TimeBanks USA,
Distinguished Professor of Law, UDC David A. Clarke School of Law

In his Inaugural Address, President Obama made some commitments that seem to defy fiscal reality:

  “A little girl born into the bleakest poverty knows that she has the same chance to succeed as anyone else.”

  “We reject the belief that America must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future.”

  “We must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit.”

The problem: there are not enough funds, public, private, philanthropic to pay the cost, at market prices, for all the educational services and all the health care services needed to make good on those promises.

For a quarter century, the TimeBanking community has been demonstrating how to make the impossible possible.  There is vast untapped capacity in community.  We have proven that:

  • Healthy seniors and their families can provide reliable, informal care that reduces medical costs.

  • Fifth graders can tutor third graders who otherwise fail to attain essential reading levels.

  • Teenagers can tutor elementary school children using evidence-based cross-age peer tutoring.

How could this get paid for?  How can we record, recognize and reward labor from a work force that is not recognized or valued by the GDP?  For decades, the TimeBank community in the United States and thirty four other countries has been learning how to do it, teaching us all that every one of us has something special to give.

The function of a medium of exchange is to put supply and demand, capacity and need together.  What money does not value, TimeBanking does.  TimeBanking provides a tax-exempt, local medium of exchange that uses Time as a currency.  One hour helping another (regardless of mainstream market value) equal one Time Credit.  TimeBanking has proven capable of harnessing vast untapped capacity that the market does not value to address vast unmet needs.

Ask the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation which just made a major award to Neighborhood Health Centers of Lehigh Valley to utilize its TimeBank program as a resource to help build a super utilizer intervention program to reduce health care costs.  For ten years, home visits by Lehigh Valley TimeBank members functioning as health coaches and providing informal support have helped folks with chronic problems stay healthy and at home.

Ask Mayor Bloomberg’s Department for the Aging which has established TimeBank programs for seniors in all five boroughs to provide the kind of informal support needed to promote health and prevent unnecessary utilization of the emergency room care by elders.

Ask the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (with a 3,000 member TimeBank) that reports that 79% of TimeBank members felt that their membership gives them support they need to be able to stay in their homes and community as they get older and 100% reported they have benefited from becoming a TimeBank member.

Ask the National Education Association or do a Google search to see if Cross-Age Peer Tutoring rates the status of an evidence-based instructional and remedial strategy.

Ask the Washington State Office of Public Instruction for its authoritative manual on Cross-Age Peer Tutoring.

Ask the National Science Foundation why it granted nearly $1million dollars to Pennsylvania State University Center for Human-Computer Interaction to develop mobile apps for TimeBanking so every Smartphone user can be a time banker.

It’s time America discovered its vast hidden wealth: people not in the work force – seniors, teenagers, children, the disabled – whose energy and capacity has been tapped by TimeBanking for over a quarter century to strengthen fragile families, rebuild community, enhance health, promote trust, restore hope.

President Obama, if you want to do the impossible, it’s time to bet on each other and on our collective capacity.  TimeBanking supplies a medium of exchange that translates “Created Equal” into a currency that embodies that equality.  If we take it to scale, we can make good on delivering those “inalienable rights” to life, liberty and pursuit of happiness promised to every one of us by the Founding Fathers.

Also see TimeBanks USA and Tucson Time Traders

ST February Meeting – Tucson’s Economy – Feb 11

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Downtown Tucson (in the large lower-level meeting room, free lower-level parking off Alameda St)

Local Economy • Financial and Monetary Innovation

Please join us for Sustainable Tucson‘s February Meeting where we’ll hear leaders and experts from Tucson and Phoenix, and engage everyone in discussion on the subject of sustainable local economy.

Our speakers will sketch the current economic condition of Tucson and the state of Arizona – prospects, challenges, and possible futures, and describe innovative approaches to exchange and finance that are emerging and could have a significant impact over the near term. We will look at the possibilities of public banking and alternative local currencies and exchange systems including community time banking, as well as innovative approaches to economic development for enterprises contributing to community resilience and sustainability – mutual credit clearing, micro-lending, and crowd-funding.

Tom GrecoBeyond Money – Tom, moderator of this evening’s program, is Tucson’s own world-renowned expert on innovative economic systems supporting community resilience and local economic independence.

Michael GuymonTucson Regional Economic Opportunities – Michael will speak on the state of Tucson’s economy. He is responsible for planning, developing and implementing the business development strategies of TREO to attract, retain and expand jobs and capital investment for the region.

Jim HannleyProgressive Democrats of America – Jim will describe ongoing efforts to institute Public Banking in Arizona. Also see the Public Banking Institute website.

C J CornellPropel Arizona – C J Cornell is Professor of Digital Media & Entrepreneurship at Arizona State University, and founder of Propel Arizona, a new platform for internet crowd-funding for local projects in Arizona.

Winona Smith & Chris VansproutsTucson Time Traders – Winona and Chris are coordinators for Tucson’s local timebank, and will talk about how community timebanking can be significant in the healing and prevention of economic troubles. Participating in Tucson Time Traders is something everyone can do right now to strengthen local community and economy!

There will also be a tour and demonstration of Tucson Time Traders‘ website on the big screen from 5:30 to 6:00 pm before the main meeting starts. Come early, and/or join us online at timetraders.metasofa.org

Join us Monday, February 11th, 2013 at the Joel Valdez Library
in the large lower-level meeting room.

Doors open at 5:30 pm
The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00 pm
Free and open to the public

Also see Public Banking InstituteCenter for Advancement of Steady-State EconomySlow Money investing in local food • SeedSpotGangplanka message to President Obama from Edgar CahnST joins Timebank and past ST articles on Economy and Relocalization

Also see the comments on this article for audio recordings and followup notes & links…

Worldwide GLOBE at Night 2013 Campaign

Worldwide GLOBE at Night 2013 Campaign

What would it be like without stars at night? What is it we lose? Starry night skies have given us poetry, art, music and the wonder to explore. A bright night sky (aka light pollution) affects energy consumption, health and wildlife too. Spend a few minutes to help scientists by measuring the brightness of your night sky. Join the GLOBE at Night citizen-science campaign. The first campaign starts January 3 and runs through January 12.

GLOBE at Night is a worldwide, hands-on science and education program to encourage citizen-scientists worldwide to record the brightness of their night sky. During five select sets of dates in 2013, children and adults match the appearance of a constellation (Orion or Leo in the northern hemisphere, and Orion and Crux in the southern hemisphere) with seven star charts of progressively fainter stars. Participants then submit their choice of star chart at www.globeatnight.org/webapp with their date, time and location. This can be done by computer (after the measurement) or by smart phone or pad (during the measurement). From these data an interactive map of all worldwide observations is created.

There are 5 GLOBE at Night campaigns in 2013: January 3 – 12, January 31 – February 9, March 3 – 12, March 31 – April 9, and April 29 – May 8.

Over the past 7 years of 10-day campaigns, people in 115 countries have contributed over 83,000 measurements, making GLOBE at Night the most successful, light pollution citizen-science campaign to date. The GLOBE at Night website is easy to use, comprehensive, and holds an abundance of background information. Guides, activities, one-page flyers and postcards advertising the campaign are available at www.globeatnight.org/pdf. Through GLOBE at Night, students, teachers, parents and community members are amassing a data set from which they can explore the nature of light pollution locally and across the globe.

Listen to a fun skit on GLOBE at Night in a 7-minute audio podcast at http://365daysofastronomy.org/2012/12/17/december-17th-the-dark-skies-crusader-retires-globe-at-night-returns/

Visit us on the Web: www.globeatnight.org
Find us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/GLOBEatNight
Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/GLOBEatNight
Subscribe to our mailing list for updates: globeatnight-list-on(at)noao.edu
Contact us: globeatnight(at)noao.edu

TUCAN – Tucson Climate Action Network – (usually) 2nd Wednesdays

at Pima Friends Meeting House, 931 N 5th Ave, Tucson AZ

Also see: monthly conference call with Citizens Climate Lobby, and the March 2013 Sustainable Tucson meeting on Climate Change Activism

 
March 16 thru 23 is the Stop Tar Sands Profiteers Week of Action – details at www.tarsandsblockade.org/actionweek

 
Jan 7, 2013

Dear friends of a sustainable future,

Happy 2013! Let’s make it a healthier one for the planet.

The regular monthly meeting of the Tucson Climate Action Network is THIS WEDNESDAY, Jan. 8, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at Pima Friends Meeting House, 931 N. 5th Ave., Tucson. Parking is in back and it’s a block from Sun Tran’s route 4.

Tar Sands Action is heating up! You can follow at TarSandsBlockade.org or the Tar Sands Blockade Facebook page. February 17 should be the biggest action yet, in Washington, D.C. The announcement below is excerpted from the letter from 350.org and the Sierra Club announcing the Feb. 17 action. If you can attend or are considering it, please contact Patsy Stewart, 520-615-0381, p.s.patsystewart(at)gmail.com, as soon as you can so we can coordinate a Tucson contingent and plan our transportation. Patsy gets a lot of e-mail! so if you contact her that way, please put “Presidents Day” or “Feb. 17 action” in your subject line and include your phone number.

Dear friends,

It’s never been clearer that we need bold and immediate climate leadership – that’s why this Presidents Day weekend thousands of activists will head to the White House and tell President Obama to shut down the climate-killing Keystone XL pipeline once and for all.

Something this big has to start early, and it has to start with the people who care the most. Commit to join us in Washington D.C. on February 17th and make this the biggest climate demonstration yet: act.350.org/signup/presidentsday

The last time we stood up against Keystone XL, thousands of us surrounded the White House – and it worked. Right when every political and energy “expert” said the tar sands pipeline was a done deal, we beat the odds and convinced President Obama to take a year to study it.

Now that year is over, and Mother Nature has filed her public comments: the hottest year in American history, a horrible ongoing drought, and superstorm Sandy. And still Big Oil is pushing as hard as ever for their pet project, looking for even more private profit at public expense.

There is also good news: Together, we’ve proven time and time again that grassroots voices can speak louder than Big Oil’s dollars. So this Presidents Day weekend, the Sierra Club, 350.org, and other environmental groups are working with our partners across the progressive community to organize the biggest climate demonstration yet.

Our goal for Presidents Day is to form a massive human pipeline through Washington, and then transform it into a giant symbol of the renewable energy future we need – and are ready to build, starting right away.

You can make this a Presidents Day weekend that the president can’t ignore and won’t forget – sign up to join the rally, bring your friends, and stop the climate-killing Keystone XL pipeline on February 17th: act.350.org/signup/presidentsday

Sustainable Tucson joins Tucson Timebank

Sustainable Tucson joins Tucson Timebank

Sustainable Tucson is a co-sponsor of our local timebank Tucson Time Traders, and Sustainable Tucson is also a member of Tucson Time Traders.

If you volunteer for Sustainable Tucson in the working groups, monthly meetings, or in other ways, you can get hours of credit in the timebank from Sustainable Tucson for the hours you contribute.  Likewise, if you benefit from the work of Sustainable Tucson, or would like to make a donation in support of the work, you can give some of your timebank credit to Sustainable Tucson.

Here is Sustainable Tucson’s member profile in the timebank,

About

Sustainable Tucson
Tucson Arizona USA Earth
www.sustainabletucson.org

Sustainable Tucson is a non-profit grass-roots organization, building regional resilience and sustainability through awareness raising, community engagement, and public/private partnerships.  Our members focus their action, advocacy, and research through working groups addressing the unprecedented challenges of our time, economic meltdown, climate change, population pressures, and resource depletion.

The mission of Sustainable Tucson is to create a community-wide network of people and organizations, facilitating and accelerating Tucson’s transition to sustainability through education and collaborative action.

Offered

Free Public Presentations – monthly meetings with speakers, documentaries, and audience discussion on sustainability issues in relation to education, politics, technologies, projects, and organizations – see www.sustainabletucson.org

Working Groups and Networking on sustainability topics – Water, Food, Green Building, Health & Healthcare, Nature Conservation, Waste Management & Recycling, Money & Local Currency, Neighborhoods & Communities, Transportation, Whole Systems, Climate Change, Renewable Energy, Economics & Relocalization, Politics & Activism, Education & Media, Arts & Culture – also see wanted

Website – current events calendar, local & global sustainability resource links (business, educational, government, and nonprofit organizations), and an archive of news & information articles and event postings since 2006 – www.sustainabletucson.org

Wanted

Leadership and participation in our sustainability working groups, and speakers and facilitators for our monthly public meetings on sustainability (see offered)

Help with updating and organizing our wordpress-based website www.sustainabletucson.org

Funding and donations to cover our operating expenses.  Also, your personal donations of timebank credit here in appreciation for the value of what we are providing (for example if you learned something important at a monthly meeting or from the website).  Your donated timebank credit will help us give timebank credit to our volunteers who are donating their time to the work of Sustainable Tucson.  Thank you!

If you’d like to join Tucson Time Traders, or would like more information, please go to timetraders.metasofa.org or come to a timebank orientation meeting.

ST January 2013 Meeting – Jan 14

at Joel D. Valdez Main Library, 101 N. Stone, Downtown (free lower level parking off Alameda St)

Sustainable Tucson 2013
How We Can Take Action in the New Year

Lots of powerful efforts are happening in Tucson and around the world to make a more sustainable and secure future. Join Sustainable Tucson on Monday, January 14 as we begin a new year and decide on the main focuses of Sustainable Tucson in 2013.

This year, Sustainable Tucson will continue our efforts to help you find ways you can take action to make your own life, Tucson, and the whole world more and more sustainable.

At the January meeting, we will join our passions and find the areas that we really want to act on. Our goal is to find those things that not only excite you, but excite a lot of people. That way, it isn’t each of us acting alone. It is many people acting together.

What’s your passion – Having healthy, local food to eat? Tackling our share of global climate change? Developing a sustainable local economy that serves Tucson? – Come to this month’s Sustainable Tucson General Meeting and find others who share your passions. It is time to act… together.

Please join us Monday, January 14th, 2013 at the Joel Valdez Library, lower level meeting room.

Doors open at 5:30 pm
The meeting will begin at 6:00 pm
Free and open to the public

Also see Sustainability Actions Everyone Can Do and personally What You Can Do – Top 10, sketches for community-wide Sustainability Plans in the menu above, and articles & resources in the Topics in Focus menu and Archive Categories below.

Tucson’s visionary Graywater Ordinance is at risk – Mayor and Council meeting at City Hall – Dec 4

Mayor and Council regular meeting at City Hall, 255 W Alameda, Tucson AZ

 

ACTION ITEM: Urge Mayor and Council Not to Repeal Tucson’s Graywater Ordinance

In 2008, the City of Tucson passed a Residential Graywater Ordinance, mandating inclusion of graywater plumbing stub outs on all new homes built in Tucson. This ordinance is among the first of its kind in the nation and demonstrates a visionary approach to address water scarcity through creative, community-driven solutions. By using graywater as an on-site landscape irrigation resource, Tucson can offset demand on potable water supplies and ultimately reduce water treatment costs.

Now the ordinance is under attack. Concerns over the added cost to homebuilders have led to a recommendation to repeal the ordinance with no review by the stakeholders who helped craft the ordinance originally.

Mayor and Council will address this issue at their regular meeting on December 4, Tuesday 5:30 p.m., at City Hall (255 W Alameda). Consider attending the meeting to support this ordinance that is an important part of our local, non-extractive water portfolio.

If the meeting doesn’t fit your schedule, please call or email Mayor Rothschild and the council members to urge them to vote NO on repealing the Residential Graywater Ordinance.

Don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater — instead, ask Mayor and Council to establish a stakeholder committee to address cost concerns and identify opportunities to improve the ordinance.

Email addresses and phone numbers for the mayor and all the council members are available here – cms3.tucsonaz.gov/citygov?qid=197768

Need more information before you call? — read WMG’s letter to Mayor and Council here – watershedmg.org/node/489

The World According to Monsanto Screening

More Than a Food Fight: Monsanto’s War Against Food Security, the Environment, Local Farmers, Local Economies, and Democracy

More Than A Food Fight:

Monsanto’s War Against Food Security, the Environment, Local Farmers, Local Economies, and Democracy

Video clips from “The World According to Monsanto” and a discussion led by Bill McDorman & Belle Starr of Native Seeds/SEARCH and Mascha Miedaner, Founder of GMO Free Project of Tucson.

The is event is FREE and open to the public.

Co-sponsored by Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, Native Seeds/SEARCH, Physicians for Social Responsibility, GMO Free Project of Tucson, Iskashitaa Refugee Network, and Progressive Democrats of America – Tucson.

The Historic Y
738 N. 5th Avenue, Tucson

November 30th, 2012 7 – 9 pm

Collaborative Redesign of the Sonoran Desert Foodshed – Localizing Our Food Supply – Gary Nabhan and Michael Brownlee – December 10

Free and open to the public at Pima Community College downtown, Amethyst Room, 1255 N Stone Ave, Tucson AZ (also see campus map for lots of free parking)

Collaborative Redesign of
the Sonoran Desert Foodshed
and Localizing Our Food Supply

with Gary Nabhan and Michael Brownlee

Please note special time and location
for this month’s Sustainable Tucson meeting,

Monday, December 10, from 6:00 to 9:00 pm
Amethyst Room, Downtown Pima College Campus

(near the Bookstore in the Student Union, 1255 N Stone Ave)
Doors open at 6:00 pm, meeting starts at 6:15 pm

Tucson currently imports about 98% of our food from outside the region. Tucson also wastes about 40,000 acre-feet per year of runoff from our streets and rights-of-way. And Tucsonan families spend nearly $2 billion per year on food, almost all of it from thousands of miles away and producing huge amounts of greenhouse gases in transport.

What can we do to insure Tucson has a food supply that is secure, nutritious, tasty, and local?   A lot!   Find out from two leading experts in local food and local economy,

  Gary NabhanCollaborative Redesign of the Sonoran Desert Foodshed: Imagining Next Steps for Tucson

  Michael BrownleeThinking Like a Foodshed: Localizing Our Food Supply

This presentation is co-sponsored by Pima County Food Alliance, Native Seeds/SEARCH, Community Gardens of Tucson, UA Southwest Center, Iskashitaa Refugee Network, Local First AZ, Sabores Sin Fronteras Foodways Alliance, ReZoNation Farm, Plant Based Nation, Local Roots Aquaponics, Local Food Concepts, and Abundant Communities Trust.

Gary Paul Nabhan is the Kellogg Endowed Chair in Sustainable Food Systems at the University of Arizona, and co-editor of State of the Southwest Foodsheds and Hungry for Change: Borderlands Food and Water in the Balance (both available on line).  An orchardkeeper of 70 varieties of heritage fruit and nut varieties in Patagonia, Nabhan was a co-founder of Native Seeds/SEARCH, Renewing America’s Food Traditions, and the Sabores Sin Fronteras Foodways Alliance.

A catalyst for relocalization, Michael Brownlee is co-founder of Transition Colorado, the first officially-recognized Transition Initiative in North America, working towards community resilience and self-reliance. Michael is the architect behind the Local Food Shift campaign to localize food and farming systems. He also co-founded Localization Partners LLC, a Slow Money affiliate, which is now investing in local food and farming enterprises as well as offering tools and processes for catalyzing food localization as economic development in communities across North America.

Stop Keystone XL tar sands pipeline – 350.org & TUCAN – Nov 18 & 19

Sunday 1 pm MST (3 pm EST) – online live stream from Washington DC

Monday 12 noon at TEP corporate headquarters, 88 E Broadway Blvd, downtown Tucson AZ

Action Alert – SUNDAY onlineMONDAY in downtown Tucson

Nov 18 Sunday 1 pm MST, live online from Washington DC

350.org is gathering outside the White House and they ask everyone to sign up online. Here is the link: 350.org/en/stop-keystone-xl. And from there you can live stream to watch the event.

Nov 19 Monday 12 noon in downtown Tucson

Young activists blockading the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline in East Texas are doing a mass action. They have asked for support rallies, and the Tucson Climate Action Network and 350Tucson are sponsoring a solidarity action at 12 noon in front of the TEP corporate HQ, downtown at 88 E. Broadway Blvd.

This will be a relatively brief demonstration (scheduled for 12:00 to 12:30 pm) and no civil disobedience is planned. However, it will be an important show of strength and solidarity, and a great opportunity to connect with others who are ready to seize the momentum of this crucial moment and raise our voices to STOP the pipeline and bring on a serious and effective approach to climate change in the U.S.

Please come stand in solidarity. Bring your signs and banners. We will speak on behalf of both national actions as well as connecting the dots between TEP as a coal-burning utility, and tar sands, and global warming, and extreme climate events.

Tar Sands Blockade is on Facebook too: facebook.com/TarSandsBlockade?fref=ts

RECENT MAINSTREAM MEDIA

The mainstream media is showing a flurry of unaccustomed attention in the wake of Hurricane Sandy and Obama’s re-election, and new World Energy Outlook report from the IEA—check out David Remnick on why Obama MUST address the nation on climate change NOW

newyorker.com/talk/comment/2012/11/19/121119taco_talk_remnick

and this report on the U.S. military’s latest warnings:

nytimes.com/2012/11/10/science/earth/climate-change-report-outlines-perils-for-us-military.html

Even our Arizona Daily Star is starting to catch on:

azstarnet.com/news/opinion/were-obama-and-romney-derelict-in-not-stressing-climate-change/article_8b3c9710-1122-5594-a2ae-ed8dc740b0e4.html and

azstarnet.com/news/science/global-warming-talk-heats-up-renewing-idea-of-a-carbon/article_fa6862f3-2e08-5ed3-ba2e-390908816e29.html

Hope to see you Monday! Stay tuned for ideas for actions you can take, both on your own and by joining with us as we go forward — because THERE IS NO PLANET B.

Tucson Climate Action Network – tucan.news(at)gmail.com

More Than a Food Fight – Monsanto’s War Against Food Security, the Environment, Local Farmers, Local Economies, and Democracy – film clips & discussion – Nov 30

Free, at the Historic Y, 738 N 5th Avenue, Tucson

 

More Than a Food Fight:

Monsanto’s War Against Food Security, the Environment,
Local Farmers, Local Economies, and Democracy

Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom presents
video clips from “The World According to Monsanto
and a discussion with Bill McDorman & Belle Starr of Native Seeds Search
and Mascha Miedaner, Founder of GMO Free Project.

Friday, November 30, 7 to 9 PM, at the Historic Y, 738 N. 5th Avenue

Admission Free

Co-sponsored by WILPF, Native Seed Search, Physicians for Social Responsibility, GMO Free Project, Iskashitaa, and Progressive Democrats of America – Tucson.

Bag It! Is your life to plastic? – free film showing – Nov 16

Free at Prescott College – Tucson, 2233 E Speedway Blvd, Tucson AZ

Free Film showing of “Bag It! Is your life to plastic?

Friday November 16th 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
Prescott College – Tucson
2233 E. Speedway Blvd.
319-9868

Free and open to the public. Limited seating available.

Healing the Whole Community: Conversations on Sustainability – Nov 15

Free at Prescott College – Tucson, 2233 E Speedway Blvd, Tucson AZ

Terril Shorb, Ph.D., Prescott College Faculty will present: Healing the Whole Community: Conversations on Sustainability and Environmental Studies At Prescott College-Tucson.

Thursday November 15th 5:30-7:30 PM
Prescott College – Tucson
2233 E. Speedway Blvd
319.9868
Free to the public

Climate Change and Energy Decline: Building resilient communities in the SW United States – Guy McPherson – November 5

at Pima Community College downtown, Amethyst Room, 1255 N Stone Ave

 

Climate Change and Energy Decline:
Building resilient communities
in the southwestern United States

with Guy McPherson

Co-sponsored by Tucson Audubon Society
and Sustainable Tucson

Please note special time and location for this month’s Sustainable Tucson meeting,

When:  Monday, November 5, 2012, 7:00 pm
Where:  Pima Community College’s downtown campus, Amethyst Room on 1255 N. Stone Ave. Easy parking! Central location! See map

Consider how many of the things that you do in your life have been made simpler by the use of cheap fossil fuels and how our planet has changed as a result. How will increasingly scarce and expensive fossil fuels affect how you live your life? Guy McPherson changed his life completely when he considered this question, reducing his use of non-renewable resources and living a more sustainable existence. He has now moved on to considering the social and economic effects of our changing climate. Guy will sign copies of his memoir, Walking Away from Empire, after his talk.

Guy was one of the “local voices” in 2006 and 2007 during the time when  a diverse group of community activists formed Sustainable Tucson. His 2006 article, “Rising gas prices, sporadic shortages are signs of the impending Tucson apocalypse” in the Tucson Weekly and his 2007 article, “Peak oil scenario paints frightening future for all”  published by the Arizona Daily Star helped educate Tucsonans to begin to respond to the emerging sustainability crisis.

To understand the latest climate change scenarios, read this recent interview with Kevin Anderson, Deputy Director of the UK Tyndall Centre, a major global climate science research center, click here.

5th Annual Free Green Living Fair – Nov 3

at the HabiStore, 935 W. Grant

 
Experts on “green” building, alternative modes of transportation, rainwater-harvesting, gardening, air quality, water and energy conservation, solar power and more will be available to discuss ways to save money with a more “green” home and lifestyle.

The Green Living Fair will be at the HabiStore, 935 W. Grant, 1/4 mile east of I-10.
Call 889-7200 for information or visit HabitatTucson.org

Eco-Health Relationship Browser – EPA Sustainable and Healthy Communities

Eco-Health Relationship Browser
EPA Sustainable and Healthy Communities (SHC) Research News Flash
September 25, 2012

The EPA Sustainable and Healthy Communities Research Program is pleased to announce the launch of the Eco-Health Relationship Browser, an easy-to-use new online tool from the SHC program.

The Eco-Health Relationship Browser illustrates the linkages between human health and ecosystem services—benefits supplied by nature. This interactive tool provides information about our nation’s ecosystems, the services they provide, and how those services, or their degradation and loss, may affect people and communities.

Ecosystems, such as wetlands and forests, provide a wide variety of goods and services, many of which we use every day. However, some of these services, such as air filtration, are not obvious and it therefore may be hard to understand the impact they have on our daily lives.

Scientific studies have documented the many tangible and intangible services and health benefits that are provided by our surrounding ecosystems. This tool is designed so that users can easily explore the services ecosystems provide and how those services affect human health and well-being. It is important to note that the studies summarized in this tool are by no means an exhaustive list. However, the inclusion of over 300 peer-reviewed papers makes this browser an exceptional compendium of current science on this topic.

If you have questions or comments please contact Laura Jackson at jackson.laura(at)epa.gov

This service is provided to you at no charge by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Welcome to the EPA Sustainable and Healthy Communities (SHC) research program News Flash. SHC is developing data, tools and approaches to help communities make decisions that better protect human health and community well being. This News Flash will provide subscribers periodic updates about SHC science, products or information. You were added to this mailing list because you are involved or have expressed an interest in sustainable communities work, ecosystem services research, or related topics.

For questions about the SHC News Flash contact Melissa McCullough mccullough.melissa(at)epa.gov, or Carolyn Hubbard Hubbard.carolyn(at)epa.gov

270 minutes of silence – Presidential debates avoiding Climate change – 350.org

Date: Mon, 22 Oct 2012 22:32:25 +0000
From: Jamie Henn – 350.org <organizers(at)350.org>
Subject: 270 minutes of silence.

Dear Friends,

Not one word.

After 270 minutes of Presidential and Vice Presidential debates, no one has mentioned climate change or global warming. If the candidates don’t speak up tonight, this will be the first time since 1988 that climate change hasn’t been discussed in a Presidential debate.

Our social media team has whipped up a hard-hitting graphic that you can use to help drive the discussion in the lead up to the debate tonight. The more noise we make online, the more likely it is that the candidates or moderator will make a last minute decision to mention climate and, just as important, that the pundits covering the event will talk about climate change.

Can you raise the volume by sharing this on your social networks?


 

The silence is unacceptable, after the country broke 17,000 heat records this summer, drought smothered half of the nation’s corn crop, and millions of acres of the American west went up in smoke. Right now, just miles away from the site of tonight’s debate, parts of Miami are underwater due to an unusually high tide — a problem that will only worsen if sea levels continue to rise.

The warning signs can’t be ignored, but our politicians have gone silent. The reason couldn’t be more obvious the fossil fuel industry has spent over $150 million dollars on this election already, with more on the way. This September alone, ExxonMobil PAC and Koch Industries PAC spent a whopping $200,000 and $354,500 apiece to influence the election.

This afternoon, we’re working with our allies to make a last minute push to put climate back on the agenda.

Your action online will be joined with action on the ground, as well: our friends from Forecast the Facts, Friends of the Earth and the Energy Action Coalition have been working to break the climate silence in the debates, and there will be a rally at the debate in Florida to call for an end to the silence today.

Thanks for making your voice heard,

Jamie

350.org is building a global movement to solve the climate crisis. Connect with us on Facebook and Twitter, and sign up for email alerts. You can help power our work by getting involved locally, sharing your story, and donating here.

Natural Beekeeping – NS/S free salon – Oct 15

at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N Campbell Ave, Tucson AZ
(note new time 5 to 7 pm)

Natural Beekeeping with Jaime de Zubeldia from ReZoNation Farm

Why is beekeeping so popular? What do we need to know about beekeeping specific to our region? Local beekeeper Jaime will share natural beekeeping methods and provide an understanding of how honeybees interact with their environment. Learn how to increase their numbers for reproduction and avoid hive disease.

Native Seeds/SEARCH Salons happen every third Monday of the month at our Retail Store at 3061 N. Campbell Ave, and have a little something for anyone who has ever wielded a fork or pitchfork. Bring your juiciest ideas and appetite for mind-watering conversations.

Native Seeds/SEARCH is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization based in Tucson, Arizona.

Fermentation Talk and Workshop with Sandor Katz – NS/S – Oct 22

Free, at Native Seeds/SEARCH Retail Store, 3061 N Campbell Ave, Tucson AZ

Can’t get enough kombucha, kimchi, or sauerkraut? Join us for a special evening with fermentation revivalist Sandor Katz, author of the bestselling Wild Fermentation. Sandor will answer your questions and share tips from his latest book The Art of Fermentation, which offers the most complete guide to home fermentation ever published. Copies will be on sale for a book signing after the discussion.

Special Food Day Screening of Genetic Roulette – Oct 24

at The Loft Cinema, 3233 E Speedway Blvd, Tucson AZ

Special Food-Oriented Presentation for Food Day, a day to celebrate healthy, sustainable food production: Movie Screening at 7 p.m. of the new groundbreaking definitive documentary on the health risks of genetically modified foods, Genetic Roulette: The Gamble of Our Lives, followed by a panel discussion of modern-day issues, problems, and solutions surrounding GMOs and the takeover of our seed supply with Bill McDorman, Executive Director of Native Seeds/SEARCH, and Melissa Diane Smith, GMO Free Project of Tucson Director of Education. $5.00 suggested donation, but no one will be turned away.

Be sure to arrive early – both to get a good seat and to visit a mini-expo of tables from sustainably oriented businesses on the patio in front of the theater before the movie. Seating will begin at 6 p.m.

See the movie trailer

More about the movie:

Are you and your family on the wrong side of a bet?

When the US government ignored repeated warnings by its own scientists and allowed untested genetically modified (GM) crops into our environment and food supply, it was a gamble of unprecedented proportions. The health of all living things and all future generations were put at risk by an infant technology.

After two decades, physicians and scientists have uncovered a grave trend. The same serious health problems found in lab animals, livestock, and pets that have been fed GM foods are now on the rise in the US population. And when people and animals stop eating genetically modified organisms (GMOs), their health improves.

This seminal documentary provides compelling evidence to help explain the deteriorating health of Americans, especially among children, and offers a recipe for protecting ourselves and our future.

GMO Free Project of Tucson – www.gmofreetucson.org

Genetic Roulette – Free Movie Showing – Oct 11

Free, at the Crossroads Theater, 4811 E Grant Road, Tucson AZ

 
A FREE movie screening  of the new groundbreaking definitive documentary on the health risks of genetically modified foods, Genetic Roulette: The Gamble of Our Lives, followed by a Q & A by Melissa Diane Smith, GMO Free Project of Tucson Director of Education.

Please register for your free seat at www.geneticrouletteoct11.eventbrite.com

(If you don’t have internet access, you may call 520-481-1128 to register)

This screening is part of the NON-GMO Month Education Series presented by GMO Free Project of Tucson, Native Seeds/SEARCH, Wellness First, Baja Arizona Sustainable Agriculture, Envision Tucson Sustainable Festival, and Tucson Food Day.

Thank you to our sponsors New Life Health Centers, Native Seeds/SEARCH, The Tasteful Kitchen and Wellness First.

See the movie trailer

More about the movie:

Are you and your family on the wrong side of a bet?

When the US government ignored repeated warnings by its own scientists and allowed untested genetically modified (GM) crops into our environment and food supply, it was a gamble of unprecedented proportions. The health of all living things and all future generations were put at risk by an infant technology.

After two decades, physicians and scientists have uncovered a grave trend. The same serious health problems found in lab animals, livestock, and pets that have been fed GM foods are now on the rise in the US population. And when people and animals stop eating genetically modified organisms (GMOs), their health improves.

This seminal documentary provides compelling evidence to help explain the deteriorating health of Americans, especially among children, and offers a recipe for protecting ourselves and our future.

GMO Free Project of Tucson – www.gmofreetucson.org

Earth Harmony Festival – Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage – Oct 6-7

at Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage, Tumacácori, AZ (South of Tucson)
Free admission, donations appreciated

Earth Harmony Festival

A weekend celebration devoted to creating a sustainable future now. EcoVillage tours on water harvesting, green building, organic gardening, solar energy, composting, and more. Live music, food, arts, children’s village, hay rides, pony rides, and other activities including special eco-presentations featuring Gary Nabhan.

For info & directions – http://earthharmonyfestival.org/ or call (520) 398-2542

 

Earth Harmony Festival Promotes Global Cooperation to Achieve Sustainability

Tumacácori, Arizona – Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage presents the Earth Harmony Festival, a weekend celebration devoted to creating a sustainable future now. The festival will be held Saturday & Sunday, October 6-7th in Tumacácori, Arizona, South of Tucson.

The vision of the Earth Harmony Festival is to encourage a restoration of balance to the world’s people and ecosystems through environmental awareness, education, and a commitment to peace and unity without uniformity. Festival coordinator TiyiEndea DellErba says, “This year’s Earth Harmony Festival shares some practical solutions to the social, spiritual and environmental issues we face in our world today.”

The Earth Harmony Festival is held at Avalon Organic Gardens & EcoVillage, one of the largest member EcoVillages in the world, nestled on 165-acres in the beautiful Santa Cruz Valley. Their sustainable practices include organic farming, education and the preservation of food diversity, permaculture principles, green building techniques, water harvesting, composting, alternative clean energy, and more. Avalon Gardens’ Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program was the first established in Arizona, feeding more than 100 people since 1995.

Internationally-celebrated author Gary Paul Nabhan will be the keynote speaker on Saturday, October 6th. Nabhan is a conservation biologist, a seed saver, and sustainable agriculture activist and has been called “the father of the local food movement”.

The core of the festival will be the ongoing tours of their working EcoVillage. From Solar Panels, to Rain Water Harvesting, to Organic Gardening, to Green Buildings, to Home-Made Goat Cheese, these EcoVillage tours will have something for every interest. Participants are encouraged to donate for the tours to help foster the EcoVillage’s many projects which are prototypes for creating a more sustainable, environmentally-conscious world.

In addition, live music, fine local art, locally made breads, food, and other natural products’ booths, a children’s village, hay rides, and special presentations by Master Gardeners, Kamon Lilly and Tarenta Baldeschi, will round out the weekend festivities.

Live music for the festival is provided by Global Change Music Nonprofit Record Label, featuring TaliasVan & The 11-piece Bright & Morning Star Band performing CosmoPop, music of the future for minds of the future. Additional artists performing are Van’sGuard, Starseed Acoustic Ensemble, and The Change Agents Band. Global Change Music lyrics speak of taking action against any form of injustice. Global Change Music promotes sustainable living, which includes growing organic food, building green, permaculture, sharing services and goods (trade and barter), and having a protective environmental consciousness.

Admission to the festival is free. Donations are appreciated to help support Avalon Gardens Internships and the Personality Integration Rehabilitation Program — nonprofit programs that assist individuals from diverse backgrounds in various levels of healing, training, and education in order to actualize their dreams and talents.

Amadon DellErba, an activist and festival promoter, encourages people to Occupy Avalon Gardens for a few days at the Earth Harmony Festival. “I hope this festival can teach and inspire others to live a more sustainable lifestyle, to come out of the age of competition, and into the age of cooperation.”

The Earth Harmony Festivals were started in the late 1990s by Gabriel of Urantia and Niánn Emerson Chase in Sedona, Arizona.

Camping is available by donation. For more information and camping reservations visit http://earthharmonyfestival.org/ or call 520-398-2542.

Envision Tucson Sustainable Festival – Oct 21

at Reid Park in Tucson AZ, free and open to the public

 

ENVISION TUCSON SUSTAINABLE FESTIVAL
A Community Event for a Bright Future

By Clinton MacKillop
September 26, 2012

Tucson, AZEnvision Tucson Sustainable and Sustainable Tucson announce the 2nd annual “Envision Tucson Sustainable” festival. The festival will take place at Reid Park on Sunday, October 21st, 2012, from 9am – 5pm. All ages are welcome.

Festival planners invite individuals and families to participate in a day of fun while exploring Tucson’s sustainable culture. The festival will promote the people, organizations, and companies in Tucson who provide services, education, and resources to help us achieve a sustainable future for our community.

The main focus of the festival this year is sustainable, secure food and agriculture for Tucson and Southern Arizona. This event will kick off a week of events in Tucson celebrating Food Day, a nationwide event promoting healthy, affordable, and sustainable food. Food vendors will feature locally sourced, organic refreshments. This year the Festival will also include a special feature: a “Non-GMO Food Zone.” In addition, in keeping with the theme, the festival will include practical information on aquaponics, an innovative, energy- and water-saving system of food production that fully integrates raising fish and growing vegetables, herbs, or other plants.

Throughout the festival, exhibits, demonstrations, and speakers will address many facets of a sustainable life, from energy and green business to health, from organic gardening to the homes we live in. The festival will be solar powered, thanks to the Solar Store, and there will be opportunities to learn about solar power for home or business.

A large family activity area will feature “Rexie,” the T-Rex Museum’s sustainability spokes-kid. Children will be able to hunt for and keep fossils from hundreds of millions of years ago.

The Festival is free and open to the public.

For more information, please visit www.facebook.com/EnvisionTucsonSustainable and click on events, or visit the festival website www.tucsonsustainable.org

For more information on Food Day events October 20-28, please visit www.tucsonfoodday.com